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UNIVERSITY 
OF SOUTHERN 
MISSISSIPPI 

bulletin 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/universityofsoutv54n4univ 



University of Southern Mississippi 
Bulletin 







GENERAL CATALOG ISSUE 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1967-1968 



FALL QUARTER OPENS SEPTEMBER 4, 1967 

Published quarterly by the University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Entered as second-class matter February 19, 1917, at the post office 

at Hattiesburg, Mississippi, under act of August 24, 1912. 



VOLUME 54 



(Published April 1, 1967) 



NUMBER 4 



„l||g|;iil|||i^g|pi i 




1967-1968 TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page No. 

CALENDAR: 1967-1968 5 

GENERAL UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 10 

Board of Trustees 11 

Administrative Officers 12 

Faculty Committees 13 

INSTRUCTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFFS 

Faculty 15 

Staff Members 35 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Historical 37 

Purposes of the University 38 

General Admission Requirements 

Freshman 39 

Transfer 39 

Military 39 

Foreign Student 40 

Special 41 

Correspondence, Extension, and Resident Center 41 

General Application Procedures 41 

Orientation and Counseling 42 

Student Community 

Housing 42 

Health and Safety 43 

Automobiles on Campus 44 

Student Activities 44 

Athletics 46 

R. C. Cook Union Building 47 

Student Expenses 47 

Student Aid and Scholarships 52 

Library 55 

Sam Woods Collection 55 

Latin American Institute 56 

Alumni Association 56 

Placement Bureau 59 

ACADEMIC ORGANIZATION AND REQUIREMENTS 

Organization Chart 59 

Organization for Instruction 60 

Academic Areas 60 

General Academic Regulations 62 

General Degree Requirements 65 

Specific Degree Requirements 69 

COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, AND DIVISIONS 

BASIC COLLEGE 74 

General Cores 74 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 86 

Honors Program 87 

Biology 87 

Chemistry 96 

Communication 99 

Computer Science and Statistics 105 

Economics 107 

English and Literature 109 

Foreign Language Ill 

Geography and Geology 114 

History 119 

Mathematics 122 



1967-1968 TABLE OF CONTENTS— (Continued) 

Page No. 

Military Science 125 

Physics and Astronomy 128 

Political Science 131 

Religion and Philosophy 133 

Science Education 136 

Sociology , 139 

Speech and Hearing Sciences 141 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 145 

Accounting 147 

Economics 149 

Finance 152 

Management 155 

Marketing 157 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 161 

Admission Requirements 161 

Student Teaching 165 

Special School Services 

Audio Visual Center 166 

Psychological and Special Education Clinic 167 

Reading Center 167 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 168 

Business Education 168 

Educational Foundations 172 

Elementary Education 173 

Guidance 176 

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 176 

Industrial Arts 183 

Library Science 188 

Psychology 191 

Special Education 193 

Human Relations 198 

Educational Administration 196 

Science Education 193 

Secondary Education 199 

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 202 

Art 202 

Music 209 

Music Education 220 

Theatre 227 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 231 

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 232 

Correspondence 232 

Community Services 232 

Conferences, Institutes, and Workshops 232 

Department of Extension and Resident Centers 233 

Associate Degree Nursing Program 233 

DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 235 

Child Development 237 

Clothing and Textiles 239 

Food and Nutrition 242 

Institution Management-Dietetics 242 

Institution Management-Commercial 243 

Home Econocics Education . 247 

Housing and Home Management 249 

Marriage and Family Life 250 

INDEX 252 



CALENDAR 



GENERAL CALENDAR 1967-1968 
FALL QUARTER^1967 

Friday, August 25, 1967 

Deadline for making application for admission 

Monday through Friday, August 28- September 1 

Pre-school rush — fraternities and sororities 

Friday and Saturday, September 1 and 2 

Various pre-quarter faculty and departmental meetings 
(faculty on duty) 

Sunday, September 3 

Dormitories open for freshman and transfer students 

Monday and Tuesday, September 4 and 5 

8:00 A.M. Orientation for freshman and transfer students 

Tuesday, September 5 

Dormitories open for former students 
5:00 P.M. Registration for night and graduate courses 
7:00 P.M. Tuesday night classes meet 

Wednesday, September 6 

Registration by appointment 

Thursday, September 7 

Continuation of registration by appointment 
Last day to register without late registration fee 

Friday and Saturday, September 8 and 9 

8:00 A.M. Classes meet on schedule (Saturday classes meet on 
Monday schedule) 

Friday, September 8 

8:00 A.M. Fee for adding and dropping courses effective 

Friday, September 15 

Last day for registering or adding Fall Quarter courses 

Wednesday, September 20 

Last day for dropping courses without academic penalty 

Saturday, October 7 (tentative) 

National Teacher Examination 

Monday, October 16 

Beginning of second term of Fall Quarter — only date for 
adding or registering for second term courses without 
penalty. 

Thursday, October 19 

English Proficiency Examination 

Saturday, October 28 

Graduate Record Examination 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, November 15, 16, 17, 18 
Fall Quarter Examinations 



General Calendar 



WINTER QUARTER— 1967-68 

Tuesday, November 7, 1967 

Deadline for making application for admission for the 
Winter Quarter 

Monday, November 27 

5:00 P.M. Registration for night and graduate courses 
7:00 P.M. Monday night classes meet 

Tuesday, November 28 

Registration by appointment 

Wednesday, November 29 

Continuation of registration by appointment. Last day of 
registration without late registration fee 

Thursday and Friday, November 30 and December 1 
8:00 A.M. Classes meet on schedule 

Fee for adding and dropping courses effective on Thurs- 
day, November 30 

Thursday, December 7 

Last day for registering or adding Winter Quarter courses 

Wednesday, December 13 

Last day for dropping courses without academic penalty 

Wednesday, December 20 

6:00 P.M. Christmas holidays begin 

Saturday, December 30 

Deadline for making application for admission for the 
second term of the Winter Quarter 

Wednesday, January 3, 1968 

8:00 A.M. Class work resumed 

Saturday, January 6 (tentative) 

National Teacher Examination 

Wednesday, January 17 

8:00 A.M. Registration for second term of Winter Quarter 

Thursday, January 18 

Beginning of second term of Winter Quarter 

Saturday, January 20 

Graduate Record Examination 

Thursday, January 25 

English Proficiency Examination 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, February 21, 22, 23, 24 
Winter Quarter Examinations 

Saturday, February 24 

Last day to file application for May graduation 



General Calendar 



SPRING QUARTER— 1968 

Monday, February 12, 1968 

Deadline for making application for admission for the 
Spring Quarter 

Monday, March 4 

5:00 P.M. Registration for night and graduate courses 
7:00 P.M. Monday night classes meet 

Tuesday, March 5 

Registration by appointment 

Wednesday, March 6 

Continuation of registration by appointment 
Last day to register without late fee 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, March 7, 8, 9 

8:00 A.M. Classes meet on schedule. (Saturday classes meet on 
Monday schedule) 

Fee for adding and dropping courses effective on Thursday, 
March 7 

Thursday, March 14 

Last day for registering or adding Spring Quarter courses 

Saturday, March 16 (tentative) 

National Teacher Examination 

Tuesday, March 19 

Last day for dropping courses without academic penalty 

Saturday, March 30 

University of Southern Mississippi Day 

Thursday, April 11 

6:00 P.M. Easter holidays begin (Thursday and Friday night and 
Saturday morning classes will meet) 

Tuesday, April 16 

8:00 A.M. Class work resumed 

Beginning of second term of Spring Quarter — only date 
for adding or registering for second term courses 

Thursday, April 18 

English Proficiency Examination 

Saturday, April 27 

Graduate Record Examination 

Tuesday, April 30 

10:00 A.M. Honors Day Convocation 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, May 15, 16, 17, 18 
Spring Quarter Examinations 

Saturday, May 18 

Graduation Exercises 



General Calendar 



SUMMER QUARTER— 1968 

Tuesday, May 21 

Deadline for making application for admission for the 
Summer Quarter 

Monday, June 10 

8:00 A.M. Orientation for freshman and transfer students 

5:00 P.M. Registration for night and graduate courses 

7:00 P.M. Monday night classes meet 

Tuesday, June 11 

8:00 A.M. Registration by appointment 

Only day to register for Summer Quarter without late fee 

Wednesday, June 12 

8:00 A.M. Classes meet as scheduled 

Friday, June 14 

Last day for registering or adding first term courses 

Tuesday, June 18 

Last day for dropping first term courses 

Wednesday, June 19 

Last day for registering or adding full quarter courses 

Tuesday, June 25 

Deadline for making application for admission for the 
second term of the Summer Quarter 
Last day for dropping full quarter courses 

Saturday, June 20 or July 6 (tentative) 

National Teacher Examination 

Friday, July 12 

First term examinations 

Saturday, July 13 

Graduate Record Examination 

Monday, July 15 

8:00 A.M. Registration for second term of Summer Quarter. Second 
term courses may be added without change of schedule 
fee 

Wednesday, July 17 

Last day for registering or adding second term courses 

Thursday, July 18 

English Proficiency Examination 

Friday, July 19 

Last day for dropping second term courses 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, August 14, 15, 16, 17 
Summer Quarter Examinations 

Saturday, August 17 

Graduation Exercises 



1967 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 

1 


S 


M 
2 


T W T F S 


1 2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 










1 


3 4 5 6 7 


8 9 


10 II 12 


13 


14 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


8 


9 


10 II 12 13 14 


15 16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


9 


10 


II 12 13 


14 


15 


9 


10 


II 12 13 


14 


15 


15 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


22 


23 


24 25 26 27 28 


29 30 


31 






23 

•*o 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


23 
30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


29 


30 


31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


■ ! BE 


S M 


T W T 
1 2 


F 
3 


S 

4 


S 


M 


T W T 
2 3 4 


F 
5 


6 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F S 








1 2 3 


4 


5 






12 3 4 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


II 


7 


8 


9 10 II 


12 


13 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


II 


12 


5 


6 


7 8 f 10 II 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


12 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


19 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 


28 






28 


29 


30 31 






27 


28 


29 30 31 






26 


27 


28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 






SEPTEMBER 






DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T 
1 2 


F 
3 


c 
4 


S 


M 


T W T 
1 


F 
2 


c 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F S 










1 


2 






1 2 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


II 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


3 


4 


5 * 7 8 f 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


II 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


10 


II 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


10 


|| 


12 13 14 15 16 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 


? r 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


2' 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


r 


17 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 
26 27 28 29 30 


26 27 


28 29 30 


31 




25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 




24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


3' 


24 

31 


25 



1968 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


| 


2 3 4 


5 


6 




1 


2 3 -4 ' 5 


6 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 




12 3 4 5 


7 8 


9 10 II 


12 


13 


7 


8 


13 


7 


8 


9 10 II 


12 


13 


6 


7 8 9 10 II 12 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


14 


15 


20 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


21 


II 


23 24 25 26 


27 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 


30 31 






28 


30 




28 


29 


30 31 






27 


28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M 


T W T 

1 


F 
2 


S 
3 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 








1 2 3 


4 






1 


2 


3 




1 2 


4 5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


5 


6 


7 8 9 10 


|| 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


II 12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


12 


13 


14 15 16 17 


18 


II 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


10 


II 12 13 14 15 16 


18 19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


19 


20 


21 22 23 24 


25 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


25 26 


27 28 29 






26 


27 


28 29 30 31 




25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 


24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 






1 


2 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 


8 


8 


9 


10 II 12 


13 


14 


8 


9 10 II 12 13 14 


10 II 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


9 


10 


II 12 13 14 


15 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


17 18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


24 25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


23 


24 


25 26 27 28 


29 


29 


30 








29 


30 31 


31 








30 























1969 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M 


T W T 

1 2 
7 8 9 
14 15 16 
21 22 23 
28 29 30 


F 

3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


S 

4 
II 
18 
25 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 

6 
13 
20 
27 


M 

7 
14 
21 
28 


T W T 

1 2 3 

8 9 10 

15 16 17 

22 23 24 

29 30 31 


F 

4 
II 
18 
25 


S 

5 

12 
19 
26 


S 


M 


T W T F S 


5 6 
12 13 
19 20 
26 27 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 2 3 

8 9 10 

15 16 17 

22 23 24 

29 30 


4 
II 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 II 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M 


T W T 

4 5 6 
II 12 13 
18 19 20 
25 26 27 


F 

7 
14 
21 
28 


S 

1 

8 
15 
22 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 

3 

10 
17 
24 

2! 


M 

4 
II 
18 
25 


T W T 

5 6 7 
12 13 14 
19 20 21 
26 27 28 


F 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


S 

2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


S 

2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


M 

3 
10 
17 
24 


T W T F S 


2 3 

9 10 

16 17 

23 24 


4 
II 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 7 8 
13 14 15 
20 21 22 
27 28 29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 5 6 7 8 
II 12 13 14 15 
18 19 20 21 22 
25 26 27 28 29 


MARCH 


june ' 




SEPTEMBER 






DECEMBER 


S M 

2 3 
9 10 
16 17 
23 24 
30 31 


T W T 

4 5 6 
II 12 13 
18 19 20 
25 26 27 


F 

7 

14 
21 
28 


S 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


s 

i 

8 
15 
22 
29 


M 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


T W T 

3 4 5 
10 II 12 
17 18 19 
24 25 26 


F 

6 
13 
20 
27 


S 

7 
14 
21 
28 


S 

7 
14 
21 
28 


M 

8 
15 
22 
29 


T W T 

2 3 4 
9 10 II 
16 17 18 
23 24 25 
30 


F 

5 
12 
19 
26 


S 

6 
13 
20 
27 


S 

7 
14 
21 
28 


M 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


T W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 
9 10 II 12 13 
16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 26 27 
30 31 



ADMINISTRATION, FACULTY, 
AND STAFF 

General Administration 

Board of Trustees 

Administrative Officers 

Faculty Committees 

Instructional and Administrative Staff 

Faculty Emeriti 

Professors 

Associate Professors 

Assistant Professors 

Instructors 

Staff 



10 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Of State Institutions of Higher Learning, State of Mississippi 



Members Whose Terms Expire May 7, 1976 

MILTON E. BRISTER, Fourth Congressional District, Kilmichael 

M. PAUL HAYNES, Northern Supreme Court District, Baldwyn 

THOMAS N. TURNER, Third Congressional District, Belzoni 

IRA L. MORGAN, Second Congressional District, Oxford 

LEON LOWERY, LaBauve Trustee (Desoto County), Olive Branch 



Members Whose Terms Expire May 7, 1972 

W. O. STONE, Central Supreme Court District, Jackson 

HENRY H. HEDERMAN, State-at-Large, Jackson 

DR. M. M. ROBERTS, Sixth Congressional District, HattiesbuTg 

E. RAY IZARD, Southern Supreme Court District, Hazlehurst 



Members Whose Terms Expire May 7, 1968 

DR. VERNER S. HOLMES, Seventh Congressional District, McComb 

J. N. LIPSCOMB, First Congressional District, Macon 

S. R. EVANS, State-at-Large, Greenwood 

TALLY D. RIDDELL, Fifth Congressional District, Quitman 



OFFICERS OF BOARD 

S. R. EVANS, Chairman 

DR. E. R. JOBE, Executive Secretary and Director 



II 



General Administration 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

WILLIAM DAVID McCAIN, B.S., M.A, Ph.D President 

ROGER BARTON JOHNSON, B.S., M.S Administrative Assistant 

PAULINE ROGERS STOUT, B.A., M.A Research and Editorial Assistant 

to the President 

JOHN HORTON ALLEN, BA., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the University 

RALPH SEER O WINGS, A.B., M.A., Ed.D Dean of the Graduate School 

CARLTON LAMAR McQUAGGE, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Dean of the School of 

Education and Psychology 

CLAUDE EDWIN FIKE, A.B., A.M., Ph.D Dean of the College of 

Arts and Sciences 

JOSEPH ARTHUR GREENE, JR., A.B., M.A, Ph.D Dean of the School of 

Business Administration 

RAYMOND MANNONI, B.S., B.M., M.M.Ed., Ed.D Dean of the School of 

Fine Arts 

SARAH LITTLETON WEAVER, B.S., M.A, Ph.D Chairman of Division 

of Home Economics 

MARY REMEGIUS HARKINS, B.S, M.S Dean of the School of Nursing 

SIDNEY E. L. WEATHERFORD, JR., B.S, M.A, Ed.D Dean of the 

Basic College 

PAUL CLAUDE MORGAN, A.B., M.S, Ed.D Dean of the Division of 

Continuing Education 

ROBERT WILLIAM PETERS, B.A, M.A, Ph.D Director of Research 

and Projects 

JAMES REGINALD SWITZER, B.S, M.A, Ed.D Dean of Student Affairs 

HERBERT EUGENE LUCY, B.A, M.Ed, Ed.D Director of 

Student Counseling 

RUBY ERNESTINE LAWHON, B.S, M.A Dean of Women 

WILLIAM RADER GRANTHAM, B.S, M.A. Dean of Men 

AUBREY KEITH LUCAS, B.S, M.A, Ph.D Registrar 

JOSEPH SAMUEL ANZALONE, B.S, M.S., Ph.D Director of Admissions 

CHARLES OTTO SMALLING, B.S Financial Secretary 

ALBERT JOSEPH JAEGER, B.B.A Assistant Financial Secretary 

WARREN FRANCIS TRACY, A.B, B.S, M.A, Ph.D Librarian 

BERNARD REED GREEN, B.S Director of Intercollegiate Athletics 

ROBERT HAYS CLEVELAND, B.S Director of Public Relations 

CLIFFORD HELMAR HAGENSON, B.S.Ed, Ph.M Director of Housing 

JAMES EDWARD BAXTER, B.S, M.A, Ed.D. . .Director of Placement Bureau 

POWELL G. OGLETREE, B.S, M.A Alumni Secretary 

WILLIAM ELLIS KIRKPATRICK, B.S, M.S. ..Director of University Union 

RALPH MANUEL SIVERIO, B.S Director of Latin American Institute 

JOEL REESE EAKENS, B.S Director of Physical Plant 



IX 



General Administration 



*FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1966-1967 

ACADEMIC COUNCIL: McCain, J. H. Allen, C. Brent, Chisholm, Clements, 
Felder, Fike, Greene, Gunn, Hamman, Harkins, Huck, A. Kelley, J. Kel- 
ley, McCarty, McCarver, McQuagge, Mannoni, Merrifield, Musgrave, 
Orange, Otto, R. Owings, Parry, B. Smith, Stegenga, Stritch, Tracy, 
Weatherford, Weaver, Zahrt. 

ADMISSIONS & CREDITS (Undergraduate): Anzalone, J. H. Allen, Fike, 
Grantham, Greene, Harkins, Lawhon, Lucas, McQuagge, Mannoni, 
Weatherford. 

ADMISSIONS & CREDITS (Graduate): Anzalone, J. H. Allen, Fike, Greene, 
Lucas, McQuagge, Mannoni, R. Owings. 

ATHLETICS: Milam, J. T. Davis, Miller, Smalling, Switzer. 

AUDITORIUM: J. H. Allen, Fike, Hartwig, R. Johnson, Mannoni, Smalling. 

CALENDAR: J. H. Allen, Anzalone, Echols, Fike, B. Green, R. Green, Greene, 
Harkins, R. Johnson, Lawhon, Lucas, McQuagge, Mannoni, Miller, P. 
Morgan, R. Owings, Siverio, Smalling, Stritch, Switzer, Weatherford, 
Weaver. 

COMMENCEMENT: J. H. Allen, Easterling, Echols, Felder, Fike, Greene, Har- 
kins, Hartwig, R. Johnson, Lucas, McQuagge, Mannoni, Ogletree, R. 
Owings, Smalling, Weaver, Wilber, Officers of the Senior Class. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION: P. Morgan, J. H. Allen, Greene, A. C. Johnson, 
McQuagge, Musgrave, R. Owings, Smalling, Welker. 

FACULTY BENEFITS: A. Kelley, C. Brent, J. T. Davis, Drain, Gonzales, W. 
Hatcher, H. O. Jackson, Jaeger, Landskov, Milam, Peters, Saetre, Sorbet, 
J. Thomas. 

FRATERNITIES & SORORITIES: Switzer, Benner, Brister, C. Chappell, J. T. 
Davis, Gough, Grantham, Lawhon, Munn, Musgrave, Nau, O. Thomas. 

GRADUATE COUNCIL: R. Owings, Golden, Hardin, Harrises, W. Hatcher, 
Pound, Stritch, J. Thomas, Tracy. 

HOUSING: Smalling, Grantham, R. Green, Hagenson, Jaeger, R. Johnson, 

Lawhon, Orvis, Switzer. 
LIBRARY: Tracy, J. H. Allen, Fike, Gonzales, Greene, Harkins, Hartwig, 

Landskov, Lane, McQuagge, Mannoni, Moorman, A. Morgan, Musgrave, 

R. Owings, Peters, Stegenga, Wall, Weaver, Wilber. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS: Cleveland, B. Chappell, Dudley, Gonzales, R. Green, 
Haines, Horton, H. O. Jackson, Lucas, Mannoni, Ogletree, Switzer. 

REGISTRATION: Lucas, J. H. Allen, Anzalone, Echols, Fike, B. Green, Greene, 
Jaeger, McQuagge, P. Morgan, R. Owings, Smalling, Switzer, Weather- 
ford. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES: Lucas, Bonner, J. T. Davis, Farmer, Felder, Golden, 
J. Kelley, Ogletree, Reck, Sullivan, Wilber, President Student Christian 
Federation. 

RESEARCH & CREATIVE ACTIVITIES: Peters, Bahr, Barker, Burrus, Coe, 
J. T. Davis, Easterling, Fike, Gonzales, Jones, A. Kelley, E. Kelly, Lane, 
Monachino, R. Owings, Pound, Stritch, Weaver, Webster, D. C. Williams. 

STUDENT AID & SCHOLARSHIPS: Switzer, Anzalone, Conn, Fike, Jaeger, 
R. Johnson, E. Kelly, Lawhon, Mannoni, Ogletree. 

STUDENT SOCIAL LIFE: Kirkpatrick, C. Chappell, H. Dickerson, Grantham, 
Lawhon, President Panhellenic Council, President Interfraternity Coun- 
cil, 1st and 2nd Vice Presidents and Social Chairman Student Govern- 
ment Association, Chairman University Union Activities Committee. 



*3 



General Administration 



TEACHER EDUCATION COUNCIL: McQuagge, Boroughs, Felder, Gonzales, 
E. Gunn, Mailey, Orange, Pound, Stegenga, Van Deusen, Weaver. 

TENURE: Burrus, Easterling, Felder, Kenamond, Orange, Pound, Stegenga. 

UNIVERSITY COUNCIL: McCain, J. H. Allen, Ambrose, Bahr, Baxter, Bonner, 
Boroughs, C. Brent, Burns, Burrus, Carter, B. Chappell, Chisholm, J. T. 
Davis, Dudley, Easterling, Echols, Fike, Foltz, Gonzales, W. Gower, R. 
Green, Greene, Grubbs, E. Gunn, Harkins, Harrises, Hartwig, W. Hatcher, 
H. O. Jackson, R. Johnson, A. Kelley, Lane, Lok, Lucas, McCarver, Mc- 
Quagge, Mailey, Mannoni, Moorman, A. Morgan, P. Morgan, Musgrave, 
Nau, Ogletree, Orange, R. Owings, Peters, Smalling, Stegenga, Stritch, 
Switzer, Tracy, Van Deusen, Van Hook, Vreeland, Walker, Weatherford, 
Weaver, Weems, Wilber, Wubbels. 

UNIVERSITY UNION: Switzer, Grantham, Hartwig, Kirkpatrick, Lawhon, 
Nesbitt, Ogletree, Interfraternity Council President, Panhellenic Council 
President, 1st and 2nd Vice Presidents Student Government Association. 

*The President of the University is ex-officio member of all committees. 
The person named first on each committee is chairman of the committee. 



H 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND 
ADMINISTRATIVE STAFFS 

FACULTY 

FACULTY EMERITI 

DR. ROY GILBERT BIGELOW, Dean Emeritus of the School of Education 

and Psychology 

MRS. MARY POE BAYLIS, Associate Professor Emerita of Music 

MISS HAZEL MARIE BLACK, Assistant Professor Emerita of Education 

MISS PEARL CAMPBELL, Associate Professor Emerita of Home Economics 

MISS ANNIE' LOUISE D'OLIVE, Assistant Professor Emerita of Art 

MRS. KATHERINE SELBY FOOTE, Associate Professor Emerita of 

Mathematics 

MRS. MINNIE BELLE FORD, Assistant Professor Emerita of Education 

MISS MARY STUART HARMON, Assistant Professor Emerita of Music 

MISS ALMA HICKMAN, Professor Emerita of English 

MISS WILLERY HARRIETTE JACKSON, Associate Professor Emerita of 

History 

MRS. NETTA McKEITHEN JENKINS, Assistant Professor Emerita of 

Latin American Studies 

MISS EMILY PEYTON JONES, Professor Emerita of Education 

MR. JOHN MICHAEL KING, Associate Professor Emeritus of Education 

DR. ROSEWELL GRAVES LOWREY, Professor Emeritus of English 

MRS. SALLIE STEVENS McLEMORE, Assistant Professor Emerita of 

Education 

MISS ANNA MARGARET ROBERTS, Librarian Emerita 

DR. WILLIAM HERBERT SUMRALL, Dean Emeritus of the Graduate School 

MISS ERNESTINE THOMAE, Associate Professor Emerita of English 
MISS AMELIA THOMPSON, Assistant Professor Emerita of Home Economics 

MR. FERDINAND ARMIN VARRELMAN, Professor Emeritus of Biology 
MISS ALLIE MARGUERITE WEBB, Associate Professor Emerita of English 

THE FACULTY 

WILLIAM DAVID McCAIN, B.S., M.A., Ph.D President of the University 

B.S., Delta State College; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., Duke University. 

PROFESSORS 

JOHN HORTON ALLEN, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the University 

and Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Southeastern Louisiana College; M.A., Louisiana State University; Ph.D.. The 
Pennsylvania State University. 

HOWARD WILSON BAHR, A.B., Ph.D Professor of English and Literature 

A.B., Oberlin College; graduate study, Ohio State University, Oberlin College; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

HARRY ROSS BARKER, JR., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Psychology 

and Director, Office of Education Research 
B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan College; M.A., Marshall University; Ph.D., Emory 
University. 

HERMAN BOROUGHS, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D Chairman of Department of 

Guidance, Professor of Education, and Counselor Trainer 

B.S., Texas College of Arts and Industries; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Missouri. 
ROBERT ARTHUR BRENT, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Professor of History 

A.B., Gettysburg College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia; post-doctoral study, 

Columbia University. 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



BAHNGRELL WALTER BROWN, B.A., M.S., Ph.D Professor of Geology 

B.A., University of Omaha; M.S., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. 

ZED HOUSTON BURNS, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Chairman of Department of 

Industrial Arts and Professor of Industrial Arts 
B.S., in Arch., M.S., Auburn University; Ed.D., University of Cincinnati; summei 
study, Columbia University; University of Alabama. 

JOHN NEWELL BURRUS, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Sociology and Professor of Sociology 
A.B., University of Mississippi; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

BEN ARLEN CHAPPELL, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Communication and Professor of Public Address 
B.A., M.A., North Texas State University; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma. 

JOSEPH HARDIN CLEMENTS, A.B., M.B.A., Ed.D Professor of Finance 

A.B., University of Kentucky; M.B.A., University of Mississippi; Ed.D., University 
of Oklahoma. 

JOSEPH WILLIAM CLIBURN, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Biology 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University 
of Alabama. 

JAMES TREAD WELL DAVIS, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.. .Chairman of Department of 

History and Professor of History 
B.S., Memphis State University; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

LENA YOUNG deGRUMMOND, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D Professor of 

Library Science 
B.A., The University of Southwestern Louisiana; B.S. in L.S., Ph.D., Louisiana 
State University. 

HORACE CHESTER DUDLEY, A.B., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Physics and Astronomy and Professor of Physics 
A.B., Southwest Missouri State College; Ph.D., Georgetown University; post-doc- 
toral studies, Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies; University of California; 
Brookhaven National Laboratory. 

HENRY BENJAMIN EASTERLING, B.S., M.A., Ed.D.. Chairman of Department 
of Educational Foundations and Professor of Education 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., University of Alabama; Ed.D., 
Duke University. 

JAMES EWELL ECHOLS, JR., Colonel, U.S.A., B.S Chairman of 

Department of Military Science and Professor of Military Science 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

VIRGINIA ISABELLE FELDER, A.B., M.S., Ed.D Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Mississippi State College for Women; M.S., Tulane University; Ed.D., Colum- 
bia University. 

CLAUDE EDWIN FIKE, A.B., A.M., Ph.D Dean of the College of Arts and 

Sciences and Professor of History 
A.B., Duke University; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

DAVID BARON FOLTZ, B.M., M.M., Mus.D Chairman of Department of 

Music and Professor of Music 
B.M., M.M., Illinois Wesleyan University; Mus.D., Texas Wesleyan College. 

BERTHA MAUDE FRITZSCHE, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Professor of 

Home Economics 
B.S., M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Ohio State University. v 

JEWEL GOLDEN, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Auburn University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Florida State Univer- 
sity. 

JOHN EDMOND GONZALES, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor of History 

B.S., M.A., Louisiana State University; Ph.D.. University of North Carolina. 

LENA YARBROUGH GOUGH, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Alabama College; M.A., George Peabody College; Ph.D., University of Ala- 
bama. 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



WILLIAM TURNER GOWER, B.Mus., M.Mus., M.F.A., Ph.D Chairman of 

Department of Music Education and Professor of Music Education 
B.Mus., M.Mus., University of Denver; M.F.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

JOSEPH ARTHUR GREENE, JR., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the School of 

Business Administration and Professor of Economics 
B.A., Berea College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

KENNETH RENO GRUBBS, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Economics and Professor of Economics 
B.S., M.S., North Texas State University; Ph.D., University of Texas. 

ERIC McCOY GUNN, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Chairman of Department of 

Secondary Education and Professor of Education 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., George Peabody College. 

GORDON GUNTER, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Biology 

A.B., Northwestern State College of Louisiana; M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas. 

RECTOR ROEMILT HARDIN, B.A., M.A., C.L.U., Ph.D Cordinator of 

Graduate Studies and Professor of Finance 
B.A., Berea College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University; C.L.U., The American College 
of Life Underwriters; post-doctoral study, Harvard University. 

ANTONIO EFTHEMIOS HARRISES, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. ..Professor of Biology 
A.B., Saint Anslem's College; M.S., University of New Hampshire; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame. 

GILBERT FREDERICK HARTWIG, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D Chairman of 

Department of Theatre and Professor of Theatre 
Ph.B., M.A., Marquette University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

WILLIAM HAMILTON HATCHER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Political 

Science 
B.A., M.A., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Duke University. 

ARTHELL KELLEY, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Geography and Geology and Professor of Geography 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., 
University of Nebraska. 

EDGAR PRESTON KELLY, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Stephen F. Austin State College; M.S., Florida State University; Ph.D., Okla- 
homa State University. 

SHERIFF L. KNIGHT, B.A., M.A., Ed.D Professor of Education and 

Director of The Film Library 
B.A., Southwestern at Memphis; M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., 
Indiana University. 

NORVIN LAWRENCE LANDSKOV, D.A., M.A., Ph.D.. .Professor of Education 
B.A., St. Olaf College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

CHARLES ELMER LANE, JR., B.S., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Chemistry and Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

WALTER JAMES LOK, B.Des., M.Des., Ph.D Chairman of 

Department of Art and Professor of Art 
B.Des., M. Des., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

JAMES SCOTT LONG, B.S. in Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D.. .Research Professor Emeritus 
B.S. in Ch.E., M.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University. 

CLARENCE EDWARD McCAR.VER, A.B., B.S., M.A., Ed.D Chairman of 

Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation and 
Professor of Health and Physical Education 
A.B., Howard Payne College; B.S., M.A., George Washington University; Ed.D., 
University of Texas. 

ROBERT FINLEY McDAVID, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D Professor of Health 

and Physical Education 
B.S., University of Notre Dame; M.S., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., University 
of Michigan. 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



JAMES HAROLD McPHAIL, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D Professor of Education 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., Boston University. 

CARLTON LAMAR McQUAGGE, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Dean of School of 

Education and Psychology and Professor of Educational Administration 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ed.D., 
University of Texas. 

JAMES HOWARD MAILEY, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Educational Administration and Professor of Educational Administration 
B.S., Western Montana College of Education; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

RAYMOND MANNONI, B.S., B.M., M.M.Ed., Ed.D Dean of School of 

Fine Arts and Professor of Music 
B.S., Kansas State College; B.M., University of Michigan; M.M.Ed., Northwestern 

University; Ed.D., Chicago Musical College; study, U.S. Navy School of Music; 
University of Chicago; Kansas University. 

JESSE LLOYD MILAM, B.A., M.A., Ed.D Professor of Health and 

Physical Education 
B.A., Louisiana Polytechnic Institute; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. 

LEO REYNOLDS MILLER, B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Ed.D Professor of 

Elementary Education 
B.S.Ed., Kansas City, Missouri Teachers College; M.S.Ed., University of Kansas; 
Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

CHARLES WICKLIFFE MOORMAN, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Chairman of 

Department of English and Literature and Professor of 

English and Literature 
A.B., Kenyon College; M.A., Ph.D., Tulane University; Guggenheim Fellow. 

RAY SIGLER MUSGRAVE, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Psychology and Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; Ph.D., Syracuse Univer- 
sity; post-doctoral study, University of Cincinnati; Columbia University. 

JOHN FREDERICK NAU, B.D., M.A., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Religion and Philosophy and Professor of Religion and Philosophy 
B.D., Concordia Seminary; M.A., Tulane University; Ph.D., University of South 
Carolina. 

HOWARD CARROLL NESBITT, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. .. Professor of Health and 

Physical Education 
B.A., Washington College; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. 

GEORGE WILSON NICHOLSON, B.S., M.A., LL.B, Ph.D. Professor of 

Mathematics 
B.S., The Citadel; M.A., LL.B., University of South Carolina; Ph.D., University of 
Norm Carolina. 

LINWOOD ELDEN ORANGE, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Professor of 

English and Literature 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 

INGOLF H. E. OTTO, A.B., M.A., C.P.C.U., Ph.D Professor of Finance 

A.B., University of Cincinnati; M.A., Ph.D., George Washington University. 

RALPH SEER OWINGS, A.B., M.A., Ed.D... Dean of the Graduate School and 

Professor of Educational Administration 
A.B., M.A., Wofford College; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. 

ROBERT WILLIAM PETERS, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. .. Chairman of Department of 
Speech and Hearing Sciences, Director of Speech and Hearing Center, 
Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences and Director of Research and Projects 
B.A., University of Minnesota; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

GOMER JEFFREY POUND, Mus.B., M.Mus. Ed., Ph.D. in M.Ed., . .Coordinator 
of Graduate Studies and Professor of Music Education 
Mus.B., Michigan State University; M.Mus.Ed., Ph.D. in M.Ed., Florida State Uni- 
versity. 

LOUIS LEROY ROGERS, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Professor of Education and 

Director of Office of Student Teaching 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi: Ed.D., University of Tennessee. 



18 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



GASTON SMITH, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., Ph.D„ University of Alabama. 

MARTIN STEGENGA, B.S., M.S., D.B.A Chairman of Department of 

Management and Professor of Management 
B.S., M.S., Mississippi State University; D.B.A, Indiana University. 

THOMAS MICHAEL STRITCH, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Emory University. 

JAMES REGINALD SWITZER, B.S., M.S., Ed.D...Dean of Student Affairs and 

Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Louisiana State University; Ed.D., 
University of Texas. 

JAMES ERNEST THOMAS, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Professor of Educational 

Administration 
B.S., Middle Tennessee State College; M.A., Ed.D., University of Tennessee. 

WARREN FRANCIS TRACY, A.B., B.S. in L.S., M.A., Ph.D Librarian 

Chairman of Department of Library Science 
and Professor of Library Science 
A.B., Earlham College; B.S. in L.S., Western Reserve University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

JOHN PIETERSEN VAN DEUSEN, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Chairman of 

Department of Elementary Education 
and Professor of Education 
B.S., M.A., Ed.D., Florida State University. 

BENJAMIN ORMOND VAN HOOK, A.B., M.A Acting Chairman of 

Department of Mathematics and Professor of Mathematics 
A.B., Millsaps College, M.A., Vanderbilt University; pre-doctoral study, Vanderbllt 
University; Duke University. 

RICHARD CRAWFORD VREELAND, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D Chairman of 

Department of Marketing and Professor of Marketing 
B.A., Rollins College; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Florida. 

JAMES FREDERICK WALKER, A.B., M.S., Ph.D.. .Chairman of Department of 

Biology and Professor of Biology 
A.B., M.S., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Iowa; post-doctoral 
study, University of Miami; University of California at L.A. 

JESSIE STEWART WALL, A.B., A.M., Ed.D. . Prof essor of Elementary Education 
A.B., Fairmont State College; A.M., West Texas State College; Ed.D., Florida State 
University; post-doctoral study, Florida State University; Columbia University. 

SIDNEY EDWARD LEE WEATHERFORD, JR., B.S., M.A., Ed.D.. .Dean of the 

Basic College and Professor of Education 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., University of Florida. 

SARAH LITTLETON WEAVER, B'.S., M.A., Ph.D Chairman of Division of 

Home Economics and Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Florida State University. 

PORTER GRIGSBY WEBSTER, B.A., M.S., Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Georgetown College; M.S., Ph.D., Auburn University. 

RALPH LEE WHITE, B.S., M.A., Ed.D.. .Professor of Educational Foundations 
B.S., University of Tennessee; M.A., George Peabody College; Ed.D., University 
of Tennessee. 

LEON AUSTIN WILBER, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Political Science and Professor of Political Science 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan; post-doctoral study. University of 
Chicago; University of Southern California. 

ROLF ENNO WUBBELS, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D Chairman of Department of 

Finance and Professor of Finance 
B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University. 

MERTON STROEBEL ZAHRT, Mus.B., Mus.M., Ed.D Professor of 

Music Education 
Mus.B., Lawrence College; Mus.M., University of Rochester; Ed.D., Columbia Uni- 
versity. 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

WALTER ABBOTT, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Tulane University; M.S., Texas A&M; Ph.D., Rice Institute. 

JOHN DOUGLAS ALCORN, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Guidance 
B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., East Texas State University. 

CONRAD MERRITT ALLEN, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Guidance 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., University of Houston; Ph.D., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

CHARLES EDWARD AMBROSE, B.F.A., M.A Associate Professor of Art 

and Resident Artist 
B.F.A., M.A., University of Alabama. 

HAYWARD GLENN ANDERSON, B.S, M.A., C.P.A Associate Professor of 

Accounting 

B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; graduate study, University of 
Alabama. 

ELIZABETH MARTIN ANTLEY, B.A., M.Ed, Ed.D Associate Professor of 

Elementary Education and Director 
of the Developmental Reading Center 
B.A., University of Mississippi; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

JAMES EDWARD BAXTER, B.A, M.A., Ed.D.. .Director of Placement Bureau 

and Associate Professor of Education 
B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., Duke University; Ed.D., University of Southern Mis- 
sissippi. 

FRANCES ELIZABETH BENNER, B.M., Mus.M. . . Associate Professor of Music 
Arthur Jordan Conservatory, Butler University, Soloist Diploma in Piano; Fon- 
tainbleau School of Music; B.M., Mus.M. in voice, Cincinnati College of Music. 

LILLY ANNELLE BONNER, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Chairman of 

Department of Business Education 
and Associate Professor of Business Education 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., Indiana University. 

RICHARD LEE BOWEN, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor of Geology 

A.B., University of North Carolina: M.A.. Indiana University; Ph.D., University of 
Melbourne; Fulbright Scholar to Australia. 

RICHARD HUGH BOWERS, B.A., M.A., Ph.D .Associate Professor 

of History 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Mississippi State University . 

COLON ATWOOD BOZEMAN, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S.A., B.S. .... Associate 

Professor of Military Science 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

CHARLES RAY BRENT, B.A., M.S., Ph.D Assistant Dean of College of 

Arts and Sciences and Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Ph.D., Tulane University. 

FRANK WILSON BUCKLEY, B.A., LL.B., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Journalism 
B.A., Louisiana College; LL.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Florida State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Southern Illinois. 

CLAUDE LOUIS CAMPBELL, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Associate Professor of 

Education 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., Ed.D., George Peabody College. 



lO 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



STANLEY MALCOLM CARPENTER, B.S., M.B.A., C.P.A. Associate Professor 

of Accounting 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.B.A., doctoral study, University of 
Georgia. 

THOMAS THORNTON CHISHOLM, B'.A., M.A., Acting Chairman of 

Department of Foreign Languages and 

Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Mississippi; M.A., University of Texas; Fulbright Fellow, Sor- 

bonne and University of Strasbourg; pre-doctoral study, University of Texas, 
Louisiana State University. 

GORDON RANDOLPH COE, A.B., M.S., Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Chemistry 
A.B., Centre College; M.S., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., University of Cincin- 
nati. 

GEORGE THOMAS CROCKER, B.S., M.S.. .Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Union University; M.S., Auburn University; pre-doctoral study, Auburn 
University. 

ALAN HART DRAKE, A.B., M.Mus.Ed., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Music Education and Director of Bands 
A.B., University of Miami; M.Mus.Ed., Ph.D., Florida State University. 

CHRISTOS LEONIDAS DOUMAS, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Political Science 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles. 

WILLIAM MUNSON FELSHER, A.B., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Foreign Languages 
A.B., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

JOHN MARTIN FRAZIER, B.S., M.A.. Associate Professor of Science Education 
B.S., M.A., George Peabody College; graduate study. University of Chicago; Leland 
Stanford University. 

MARY ALLEN GAYLE, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Home Economics 
B.S., Ball State University; M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Purdue University. 

'ALBERT DONALD GEORGE, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Speech and Hearing Sciences 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

KENNETH URIAL GUTSCH, B.M., M.Ed., Ed.D Associate Professor of 

Education 
B.M., University of Miami; M.Ed., University of Mississippi; Ed.D., Florida State 
University. 

GLENN TERRY HARPER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. . . .Associate Professor of History 
B.A., Furman University; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

ROBERT DENECKE HAYS, B.S., M.S., D.Mus. .. Associate Professor of Music 
B.S., M.S., University of Oregon; D.Mus., Indiana University. 

CLARENCE CHARLES HOLDEN, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.S Associate Professor of 

Educational Administration 
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.S., University of Florida. 

JOSEPH FRANCIS HUCK, Mus.B., M.M Associate Professor of Music 

Mus.B., M.M., American Conservatory; graduate study, American Conservatory; 
Chicago Musical College. 

MALCOMB WAYNE HUCKABEE, B.A., MA., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Psychology 
B.A., Mississippi College; M.A., Texas Christian University; Ph.D., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

ELVIN MAX HUNTER, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D Associate Professor of Industrial 

Arts 
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Missouri. 



11 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



HOWARD OLIVER JACKSON, B.S., M.A., C.P.A Acting Chairman 

of Department of Accounting 

and Associate Professor of Accounting 

B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; graduate study, University of 

Alabama. 

BRYCE DONNELL JORDAN, B.S., M.P.A Associate Professor of Finance 

B.S., Mississippi State University; M.P.A., Harvard University; pre-doctoral study, 
University of Alabama. 

FREDERICK DILL KENAMOND, A.B., M.S., C.P.A Associate Professor of 

Accounting 
A.B., Shepherd College; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; pre-doctoral 
study, University of Alabama. 

NORMAN HALVOR KIESS, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. .. Associate Professor of Physics 
B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. 

JAMES DOUGLAS LOWE, JR., B.S., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Psychology 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

AUBREY KEITH LUCAS, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Registrar and 

Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Florida State University. 

HERBERT EUGENE LUCY, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D Director of Student 

Counseling and Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., William Carey College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

HELEN JANET McDONALD, Mus.B., M.M Associate Professor of Music 

Education 
Mus.B., M.M., Chicago Musical College; graduate study, University of Michigan; 
Chicago Musical College. 

HARVEY EDWIN MAIER, B.A., M.A., Ed.D Associate Professor of Music 

Education 
B.A., North Dakota State Teachers College; M.A., University of Washington; 
Ed.D., Columbia University. 

LILLIEN ERL MEHEARG, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Psychology 
BA, Millsaps College; M.A., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

ASHLEY GRANTHAM MORGAN, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D Chairman of 

Department of Science Education 
and Associate Professor of Science Education 
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia; M.Ed., University of Virginia; Ed.D., University of 
Georgia. 

FRANCES ROBERTA JELLINEK MYERS, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Associate 

Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Brooklyn College; M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Columbia 
University. 

KARL NEUMANN, LL.D., M.F.A Associate Professor of Music Education 

L.L.D., Prague University; M.F.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 

CARL RA.Y NEWSOM, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., University of Alabama; Ph.D., George Peabody 
College. 

STANLEY JOSEPH PARRY, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Political Science 
A.B., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Georgetown University; Ph.D., Yale Uni- 
versity. 

JOHN PHILLIP POSEY, B'.S,, M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor of History 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia. 



11 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



WILLIAM HENRY PRESSER, A.B., Mus.M., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Music 
A.B., Alma College; Mus.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Ro- 
chester; post-doctoral study, George Peabody College; University of the South. 

MARGUERITE LANG RITTENHOUSE, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Associate 

Professor of Finance 
B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University. 

ANTHONY CLAUDE ROUCHON, JR., Major, U.S.A., B.S Associate 

Professor of Military Science 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

GILBERT THEODORE SAETRE, B.S., M.A. in Mus.Ed Associate Professor 

of Music Education 
B.S., M.A. in Mus.Ed., New York University; graduate study, Juilliard School of 
Music. 

WILLIAM KAUFFMAN SCARBOROUGH, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Associate 

Professor of History 
A.B., University of North Carolina; M.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina. 

EDUARDO GONZALEZ SCHEEL, B.A, M.A Associate Professor of 

Foreign Languages 
B.A., M.A., pre-doctoral study, University of Texas. 

BYRON COLMAN SMITH, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Indiana State University; M.A., DePauw University; Ph.D., University of 
Georgia. 

ELIZABETH MELANIE SORBET, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Marketing 
A.B., Northwestern State College of Louisiana; M.A., George Peabody College; 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

SHELBY FRELAND THAMES, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Chemistry 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

WILLIAM TUCHAK, LL.M., I. A.M., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Political Science 
LL.M., Casimir University; I.A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Colorado. 

FORREST DALE TUCKER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Public Address 
B.A., University of Wichita; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University. 

FRANK LEROY TURNER, JR., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of History 
B.A., Southwestern at Memphis; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

MINER LILE WEEMS, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor of Political 

Science 
B.A., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University. 

PAUL FRANCIS WIESEND, B.A., LL.B., M.A Associate Professor of 

Finance 
B.A., Duquesne University; LL.B., St. Mary's University; M.A., Mississippi State 
University. 

NELLIE FINNEY WHISENHUNT, B.A., M.S.N .Ed Associate Professor 

of Nursing 
B.A., University of Texas; M.S.N.Ed., Catholic University of America. 

ANNETTE BEDFORD WILDER, B.A., M.A. in L.S Humanities Librarian 

B.A., William Carey College; M.A. in L.S., George Peabody College. 

D. C. WILLIAMS, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D Director, Bureau of Business 

and Economic Research and Associate Professor of Economics 
B.S., Southeastern Louisiana College; M.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 



*3 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



FORREST EDWARDS WOOD, JR., B.A., Th.D Associate Professor 

of Religion and Philosophy 
B.A., Baylor University; Th.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

WALTER HARRY YARROW, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Associate Professor 

of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.A., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

HERMAN LAWRENCE ZILLMER, B.A., M.S., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Theatre 

B.A., Ft. Hays Kansas State Teachers College; M.S., Kansas State University; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

JOY ANN ALLEN, B.M., M.M Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M., North Texas State University. 

PAUL DAVID ANDERSEN, B.Mus., M.Mus Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Drake University; M.Mus., Syracuse University; doctoral study, Washing- 
ion University. 

WILLIAM HILTON ANDERSON, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor of 

English and Literature 
A.B., Wofford College; M.A., Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

JOSEPH SAMUEL ANZALONE, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Director of Admissions 

and Assistant Professor of Educational Administration 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Florida State University. 

'HAROLD VINCENT AVERY, B.M.Ed., M.Mus.. .Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M.Ed., M.Mus., University of Nebraska; pre-doctoral study, University of Texas. 

"FLORA LEE BAIN, B.S.N., M.A Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N., University of Mississippi; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

NANCY LORENE BAKER, B.A., M.S.W., C.S.W Assistant Professor 

of Psychology 
B.A., Texas College of Arts and Industries; M.S.W., C.S.W., Louisiana State 
University. 

MABEL MAE BALDWIN, B.S. in Ed., M.A Assistant Professor of 

Business Education 
B.S. in Ed., Central Missouri State College; M.A., University of Iowa; graduate 
study, Columbia University. 

^OSE LUIS BARRIO-GARAY, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., Instituto de Ensenanza Media; M.A., University of Madrid; advanced study, 
Paris, France; Rome, Italy; Mississippi State University. 

JOHN LEWIS BEAN, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., M.A., University of Texas; doctoral study, University of Pittsburgh. 

'IRVING BECKER, B.M., M.M Assistant Professor of Music Education 

B.M., Manhattan School of Music; M.M., Duquesne University. 

JOHN HOLCOMBE BEDENBAUGH, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Chemistry 
B.S., Newberry College; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., Universtiy of 
Texas. 

HUGH MYERS BIRMINGHAM, B.Mus., M.A Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., M.A., North Texas State University; post-graduate study, Indiana Uni- 
versity. 

BEN ALLAN BLACKMON, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Mississippi College; M.A., Louisiana State University; pre-doctoral study, 
Louisiana State University. 



2,4 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



GORDON CREWS BOND, B.S, M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., Florida Southern College; M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University. 

JOHN HOWARD BOUNDS, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Geography 
B.S., Florida Southern College; M.Ed., University of Florida; Ph.D., University 
of Tennessee. 

HILDA LYNELL BRISTER, B.S., M.S.. .Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; graduate study, Eastern Kentucky 
State College. 

MARICE COLLINS BROWN, A.B., M.A. .. Assistant Professor of English and 

Literature 
A.B., Mississippi State College for Women; M.A., University of Southern Missis- 
sippi; pre-doctoral study, University of Washington; Louisiana State University. 

FRED WALDO BROWN, B.S, M.A, Ed.D Assistant Professor of 

Science Education 
B.S., Georgia Southern; M.A., University of Alabama; Ed.D., University of Georgia. 

'GEORGE EDWIN BULLARD, B.S, M.S Assistant Professor of Marketing 

B.S., University of Arizona; M.S., Mississippi State University. 

CORRIE LYNNE BUNCH, B.S, M.A. in L.S Order Librarian 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A. in L.S, George Peabody College. 

^TTAMISE COLLEEN WHITTINGTON CAMERON, B.S, M.S Assistant 

Professor of Business Education 
B.S, M.S, University of Southern Mississippi; pre-doctoral study, Indiana Uni- 
versity. 

AUGUST NORBERT CARNOVALE, B.M, M.A. .. Assistant Professor of Music 

Education 
B.M, Louisiana State University; M.A, Columbia University; advanced study, 
Colorado Western State College; Oklahoma State University. 

DANNY REED CARTER, B.S, M.S Chairman of Department of Computer 

Science and Statistics and Assistant Professor of 
Computer Science and Statistics 
B.S., M.S, University of Southern Mississippi; pre-doctoral study, Vigrinia Poly- 
technic Institute. 

ELSIE BOSCHERT CHICHESTER, B.S, M.S Assistant Professor of 

Home Economics and Director of the Nursery School 
B.S, Delta State Teachers College; M.S, University of Tennessee. 

ERNEST JAMES CLARK, JR., B.A, M.A, Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of History 
B.A, Lenoir-Rhyne College; M.A, Ph.D, University of North Carolina. 

JOE LEASEL CLAYTON, JR., B.A, LL.B.. . .Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., LL.B, Southern Methodist University; doctoral study, University of Texas. 

WILLIAM SIDNEY COKER, B.A, M.A, Ph.D.. .Assistant Professor of History 
B.A, University of Oklahoma; M.A, University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., 
University of Oklahoma. 

JOHN MELTON COLEMAN, B.S, M.S, Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Geography 

B.S, Mississippi State University; M.S, Indiana University; Ph.D, California 
State Polytechnic College. 

MARGUERITE ROSE COWLES, B.A, M.S Education and 

Psychology Librarian 
B.A, Louisiana State University in New Orleans; M.S, Louisiana State University. 

GENE ARNOLD CROWDER, B.S, M.Ed Assistant Professor of Industrial 

Arts 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.Ed., Colorado State University; doc- 
toral study, Texas A&M University. 

2 GEORGE FREDERICK CROZIER, JR., B.S, Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Biology 
B.S, Loyola University of the South; Ph.D., University of California at San Diego. 



*5 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



JAMES LOUIS DAVIS, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Management 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, Louisiana State 
University. 

JULIA McBROOM DAVIS, B.A., M.S., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Speech and Hearing Sciences 
B.A., M.S., Northwestern State College of Louisiana; Ph.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

GALE SANDERS DICKERSON, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor 

of Home Economics 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

JOHN ROBERT DONOHUE, B.M., M.M Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M., Louisiana State University; pre-doctoral study, Michigan State Uni- 
versity. 

JOHN HOWARD DORLAND, Captain, U.S.A., B.S Assistant Professor 

of Military Science 
B.S., United States Military Academy. 

LOIS ARENDER DRAIN, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Northeastern State College; M.S., Oklahoma State University. 

NETTIE ETOILE DUBARD, B.S., M.A. .. Director of Deaf and Aphasic School 

and Assistant Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences 

B.S., Mary Hardin-Baylor University; M.A., George Peabody College; graduate 

study, University of Texas; University of Utah; Central Institute for the Deaf at 

Washington University. 

JESSE FRANKLIN EDWARDS, Captain, U.S.A., B.S., M.S Assistant 

Professor of Military Science 
B.S., Auburn University; M.S., Purdue University. 

iWOODROW WILSON ELLIS, B.A., M.B.A Assistant Professor 

of Management 
B.A., University of Mississippi; M.B.A., University of Alabama. 

THOMAS GLENVALL ESTES, JR., B.S., M.S., C.P.A Assistant Professor 

of Accounting 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Oklahoma State University. 

DAVID JULIUS ETZOLD, B.S., M.B.A. ... Assistant Professor of Management 
B.S., Mississippi State University; M.B.A., Rollins College; post-graduate study, 
Mississippi State University. 

MASON LEON EUBANKS, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of English and 

Literature 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., University of Mississippi; graduate 
study, George Peabody College. 

RUSSELL IRWIN EVERETT, B.S., M.A.. .Assistant Professor of Public Address 
B.S., State Teachers College at Slippery Rock, Pa.; M.A., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity; post-graduate study, Ohio State University. 

WILLIE EVELYN EWELL, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of 

Business Administration 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., Colorado State College of Educa- 
tion; graduate study, University of Denver; University of Colorado. 

LARRY THOMAS FELTY, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Art Education 

B.S., M.S., East Texas State University. 

ARTHUR GEOFFREY FISH, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Carleton University; M.S., McGill University; pre-doctoral study, Univer- 
sity of British Columbia. 

MADELINE VIRGINIA FLYNT, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor of Library 

Science 
A.B., William Carey College; Certificate in Library Science, University of Ala- 
bama; M.A., George Peabody College. 

BILL W. FRANKS, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., North Texas University; M.S., University of Wisconsin; post-graduate study, 
Texas A&M University. 



%6 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



ARGLE SCOTT GARROW, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor of 

English and Literature 
B.S., Hampden-Sydney College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

MILDRED JOYCE GILES, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Speech 

and Hearing Sciences 
B.S., M.S., doctoral study, University of Southern Mississippi. 

BILL WES GORE, B.S., M.S Director of Natchez Resident Center 

and Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Mississippi College; M.S., University of Mississippi. 

ALBERT EDWARD GOWER, JR., A.B., M.M Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., Sacramento State College; M.M., University of Oregon; post-graduate study, 
North Texas State University. 

WILLIAM RADER GRANTHAM, B.S., M.A Dean of Men and Assistant 

Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; pre-doctoral study, Louisiana State 
University, 

CLIFFORD HELMAR HAGENSON, B.S.Ed., Ph.M Director of Student 

Housing and Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S.Ed., University of Illinois; Ph.M., University of Wisconsin; graduate study, 
University of Illinois. 

ALTRA HOWSE GILL HAMMAN, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of 

Home Economics 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

JAMES THOMAS HANSON, B.S Mississippi Librarian 

B.S., Louisiana State University. 

ALTON LAMAR HARE, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Northeast Louisiana State College; M.S., Louisiana Polytechnic Institute; 
graduate study, Auburn University. 

ROBERT DALE HATCHER, SR., B.S.F., M.S Assistant Professor 

of Geography 
B.S.F., M.S., doctoral study, University of Georgia. 

FERN ROGERS HESSON, B.S., M.A, . .Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

LEE KEMERLY HILDMAN, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University; pre-doctoral study, University of Florida. 

ROGER HARVEY HILL, B.M., M.M Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M., Indiana University. 

GUY MANN HORTON, B.S., M.Ed Assistant Professor 

of Journalism 
B.S., M.Ed., East Texas State College; graduate study, University of Texas. 

GEORGE GIBSON HURST, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Tulane University. 

GEORGE EUGENE IMBRAGULIO, B.M., M.M.. .Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M., M.M., Michigan State University; summer study, Aspen, Colorado; St. Cecilia 
Conservatory, Rome, Italy; Florida State University; Michigan State University. 

RAOUL FRANK HOWARD JEROME, B.M., M.M Assistant Professor 

of Music Education 
B.M., M.M., North Texas State University. 

MARION CLOWER JOHNSON, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Health and 

Physical Education 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Louisiana State University. 



*7 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



SARAH STEVENSON JOHNSON, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor of 

Foreign Languages 
B.A., M.A., University of South Carolina; study at Institute de Touraine, Tours, 
France; Escuela Normal Superior, Bogota, Columbia; Purdue University; Sor bonne, 
University of Paris. 

SAMUEL BASCOM JONES, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Biology 
B.S., M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

WALLACE GRANT KAY, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor of 

English and Literature 
B.A., Southern Methodist University; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University. 

DAVID WINSTON KNIGHT, B.S., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Florida; Ph.D., Florida State University. 

SHARON ELAINE LEBSACK, B.A., B.M., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Music Education 
B.A., B.M., M.A., Colorado State College. 

KIE WOOK LEE, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Seoul National University; M.A., doctoral study, Vanderbilt University. 

MARY MARGARET McCARTHY, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Home Economics 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

KENNETH GRAHAM McCARTY, JR., B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of 

History 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; pre-doctoral study, Duke Univer- 
sity. 

HARRY WELLS McCRAW, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of English 

and Literature 
B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A., Tulane University. 

JESSE OSCAR McKEE, B.S. in Ed., M.A. ... Assistant Professor of Geography 
B.S. in Ed., Clarion State College; M.A., Michigan State University. 

JAMES MERWYN McQUISTON, JR., B.S Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; pre-doctoral study, University of Vir- 
ginia. 

THEODORE WALTER MADSEN, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Music Education 
B.A., Colorado State College; M.A., University of Iowa. 

ROBERT BRUCE MAHAFFEY, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Speech and Hearing Sciences 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

THOMAS STANLEY MARTIN, B.S., M.Ed., M.D.. .Director of Student Health 
Services and Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Mississippi College; M.Ed., University of Southern Mississpipi; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Mississippi. 

JOHN PORTER MASSEY, Major, U.S.A., B.S Assistant Professor of 

Military Science 
B.S., Middle Tennessee State College. 

BARNEY RAY MEADERS, III, Major, U.S.A., B.S Assistant Professor of 

of Military Science 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

RICHARD JUNIUS MENDENHALL, B.S., M.Ed Assistant Professor of 

History, Biloxi Resident Center 
B.S., Livingston State College; M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi. 



*8 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



VERNON EUGENE MERRIFIELD, B.F.A., M.A Assistant Professor of Art 

B.F.A., M.A., University of Alabama. 

LOLA PENNY AN MOBLEY, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Political Science 
A.B., M.A., George Washington University; pre-doctoral study, University of 
Kentucky. 

FRANCIS LEONARD MONACHINO, B.A., M.S Assistant Professor 

of Music 
B.A., Brooklyn College; graduate study, Mannes College; Tanglewood; Columbia 
University; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

JACK DOUGLAS MUNN, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., University of Alabama; graduate 
study, Oklahoma State University. 

SHIRLEY MURPHY, B.S., M.S Reference Librarian 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Louisiana State University. 

EDITHA SCHLANDSTEDT NEUMANN, B.A., M.S.W.. .Assistant Professor of 

Foreign Languages 
B.A., University of Berlin; M.S.W., University of Pittsburgh; doctoral study, 
Tulane University. 

FANNIE OZELL OWINGS, B.S., M.S.. .Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., University of Tennessee; graduate 
study, University of Kentucky; Michigan State University. 

CLIFTON OSBORN PADGETT, B.A., M.Ed., Assistant Professor 

of Education 
B.A., William Carey College; M.Ed., University of Southern University. 

BARBARA ANN PARSONS, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor of 

Religion and Philosophy 
B.A., Rosary College; M.A., St. Louis University; doctoral study, Tulane Uni- 
versity. 

OSCAR LAWRENCE PAULSON, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Geology 
B.S., M.S., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

PAUL WALLACE PEDDICORD, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D Assistant Professor 

of Educational Foundations 
B.A., Furman University; M.Ed., University of Houston; Ed.D., Duke University. 

WILLIAM HARVEY POIRIER, B.S., M.A., Ed.S Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., Eastern Michigan University; M.A., Ed.S., George Peabody College. 

LEMUEL EUGENE POLLOCK, B.A., M.B.A., MA Assistant Professor 

of Theatre 
B.A., Pasadena Playhouse; M.B.A., University of Chicago; M.A., California State 
University at Los Angeles. 

FLORA MAE POSEY, B.S.N.E., M.S.N Director of Nursing Program and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing, Natchez Resident Center 
B.S.N.Ed., Incarnate Word College; M.S.N., University of Texas. 

MORTON HERBERT RABIN, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., New York University; M.A., Columbia University; pre-doctoral study, Co- 
lumbia University and Florida State University. 

FRANCES ELIZABETH RECK, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of 

Business Education 
B.S., Kansas State Teachers College; M.A., State University of Iowa; graduate 
study, New York University; Gregg College; Indiana University; University of 
Colorado. 

ELIZABETH ROGERS REYNOLDS, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor of 

English and Literature 
B.A., Winthrop College; M.A., Columbia University; doctoral study, University of 
South Carolina. 

JOHN DICK REYNOLDS, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Biology 
B.S., M.Ed., Temple University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 



*9 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



ROBERT PAUL RUSSUM, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of 

Computer Science and Statistics 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Louisiana State University. 

WILLIAM FEAGIN ST. CLAIR, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Florida; M.A., University of Alabama; graduate study, Univer- 
sity of Alabama. 

JAMES ANDREW SCOGGINS, B.A., M.Ed Assistant Professor 

of Secondary Education 
B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi. 

RALPH MANUEL SIVERIO, B.S Director Latin American Institute and 

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.S., Louisiana State University; graduate study, Louisiana State University; 
San Francisco State College. 

JOHN RAY SKATES, JR., B.B.A., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of History 

B.B.A., University of Mississippi; M.A., Ph.D., Mississippi State University. 

4 BILLY BORDEN SLAY, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor of Health and 

Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; pre-doctoral study, Louisiana State 
University. 

JACK ALAN SMITH, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of English 

and Literature 
B.S., Troy State College; M.A., Auburn University; pre-doctoral study, Auburn 
University. 

BURDETTE WILSON SMYTHE, B.F.A., M.Ed Assistant Professor 

of Music Education 
B.F.A., M.Ed., Ohio University. 

FRED WILLIAM SPURLIN, B.A., M.S Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., M.S., Southern Illinois University. 

LEONARD DON STOCKER, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., University of Michigan; M.A., Columbia University. 

PETER KONRAD STOCKS, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Louisiana 
State University. 

2 CHARLES ELLIS STURGEON, Captain, U.S.A., B.S Assistant Professor 

of Military Science 
B.S., United States Military Academy. 

WARREN CLAYTON SULLIVAN, B.A., B.D., Th.D Assistant Professor 

of Religion 
B.A., Mississippi College; B.D., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

ALBERT HENRY SWANN, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor 

of Science Education 
B.S., Carson-Newman College; M.S., University of Mississippi. 

ORVILLE MALCOLM THOMAS, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of 

Industrial Arts 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., University of Alabama. 

JAROSLAW TOMASZWISKYJ, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Foreign Languages 
B.S., Ukrainian School of Economics; M.A., New York University. 

JAMES AIRD TOWNLEY, B.S., M.A Assistant Professor of Health 

and Physical Education 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; pre-doctoral study, Louisiana State 
University. 

ELIZABETH VARDAMAN, B.A., M.A., M.A. in L.S Periodicals Librarian 

B.A., M.A., University of Mississippi; M.A. in L.S., George Peabody College. 



3° 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



DURWARD CLIFTON WARE, JR., B.A., M.Mus.. .Assistant Professor of Music 
B.A., Millsaps College; M.Mus., University of Southern Mississippi. 

MAXINE YOUNG WARREN, B.S., M.Ed Assistant Professor 

of Elementary Education 
B.S., M.Ed., North Texas State University. 

TOMMY GENE WATSON, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor of English and 

Literature 
A.B., Oklahoma Baptist University; M.A., University of Arkansas; pre-doctoral 
study, University of Arkansas and Louisiana State University. 

LATNEY CONRAD WELKER, JR., B.S., M.A., Ed.D Assistant to the Dean 

of the School of Education and Psychology and Assistant 
Professor of Educational Foundations 
B.S., Millsaps College; M.A., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

DAVID LEE WERTZ, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Arkansas State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Arkansas. 

BEN MARSHALL WEST, B.S., M.S., LL.B Assistant Professor of Finance 

B.S., United States Military Academy; M.S., University of Colorado; LL.B., Uni- 
versity of Mississippi. 

CARL EVERETT WILLER, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., Marshall College; M.A., Columbia University; pre-doctoral study, Univer- 
sity of Florida. 

CLINTON LOWERY WILLIAMS, JR., Major, U.S.A., B.S. . .Assistant Professor 

of Military Science 
B.S., Mississippi State University. 

RAYMOND GUINN YOUNG, B.M.Ed., M.M Assistant Professor of Music 

Education 
B.M.Ed., M.M., University of Michigan. 

INSTRUCTORS 

BARBARA ANN ADAMS, BA Instructor in English and Literature 

B.A., University of Mississippi. 

VIRGINIA CAMPBELL ALEXANDER, B.A. in P.Ed., M.Ed Instructor 

in Health and Physical Education 
B.A. in P.Ed., M.Ed., University of Texas. 

IRMGARD MATHXLDE ZEYSS ANDERSON Instructor in Foreign 

Languages 
Abitur, Bayreuth, Germany; Abschlussexamen, Doltmetscherschule, Coberg, 
Germany. 

MANE RYON ANDERSON, A.B., M.A Instructor in English 

A.B., Randolph Macon Woman's College; M.A., University of South Carolina. 

CORA ELIZABETH SUITS BALMAT, B.S.N., M.S.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S.N., Louisiana State University in New Orleans; M.S.N., University of Cali- 
fornia at San Francisco. 

JASON BASINGER, Sergeant First Class, U.S.A Instructor in 

Military Science 

ALLEN HARVEY BIZZELL, B.S., M.B.A Instructor in Accounting 

B.S., M.B.A. , University of Southern Mississippi. 

BILLY JOE BOTTOMS, Sergeant First Class, U.S.A Instructor in 

Military Science 

ROSALIE PARKIN BRAND, B.S Assistant Cataloger 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

WILLIAM OSCAR BRANTLEY, B.S., M.Ed Instructor in Education 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi. 

LOIS TRUE BRELAND, B.S., M.S Instructor in English 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

BONNIE CARTER BRINEGAR, B.A Instructor in English 

B.A., University of Mississippi; graduate study, University of Mississippi. 



3 1 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



MARIANNE BROWN, B.S., M.A. .. Instructor in Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Delta State College; M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; graduate 
study, University of Alabama. 

'MITZI LOUISE BROWN, B.A., M.A Instructor in English and Literature 

B.A., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

RUTH BUCKLAND BROWN, B.S., M.S Instructor in English 

and Literature 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

HILLMAN HERBERT BUTLER, B.S., M.S Instructor in Mathematics, 

Biloxi and Harrison County Resident Centers 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

ROGER DALE CALCOTE, B.S., M.B.A Instructor in Accounting 

B.S., M.B.A. , University of Southern Mississippi. 

MARY HELEN CAMPBELL, B.S Instructor in Art 

B.S., graduate study, Florida State University. 

LAURITZ B. CHRISTENSEN, B.S., M.S Instructor in Psychology 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

GLADYS CARLETON CLARKE, B.S.N., M.S.N Instructor in Nursing 

Natchez Resident Center 
B.S.N., University of Alabama; M.S.N., Duke University. 

MARGARET GASTON CLAYTON, B. A. .. Instructor in English and Literature 
B.A., Southern Methodist University; graduate study, University of Texas. 

DONNA LYNN LOFTIN CONERLY, B.S., M.S Instructor in Business 

Education 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

WILLIE EARL COOLEY, B.S., M.Ed Instructor in Education 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi. 

VIRGINIA KATHERINE PACE CROMWELL, B.S Instructor in 

Public Address 
B.S., Mississippi State College for Women. 

JOHN HARBERT DALE, B.S., M.S Instructor in Biology 

B.S., Mississippi State University; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

CHARLES TAPPAN deARRIGUNAGA, B.A., M.B.A.. .Instructor in Economics 
B.A., M.B.A., Louisiana Polytechnic Institute. 

RAYMOND VIVIAN DOWNEY, B.A., M.A.. Instructor in English 

B.A., William Carey College; M.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

JAMES ALLEN EDWARDS, JR., B.A., M.A.. .Instructor in Foreign Languages 
B.A., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., University of Kentucky. 

LINDA ROSE ELKINS, B.S Instructor in English and Literature 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

MARY HAMRICK ELLIS., A.B., M.A Instructor in Public Address 

A.B., University of Alabama; M.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

ALICE WILKINSON ESSARY, B.S., M.S Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

JOAN MARY GOROSKI FALSONE, B.S Part-time Instructor in 

Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Florida State University. 

GIOVANNI FONTECCHIO, B.S., M.A Instructor in Foreign Languages 

B.S., Northern Michigan University; M.A., Louisiana State University. 

LINDA FAYE SHURDEN FEDUCCIA FOX, B.A., MS Instructor in 

English and Literature 
B.A., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

JESSE WALTER FRIER, Staff Sergeant, U.S.A.. .Instructor in Military Science 

PATRICIA HARRIS GARROW, B.A., M.A Instructor in 

Mathematics 
B.A., Meredith College; M.A., The University of North Carolina. 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



META LEWIS GRADY, B.A Instructor in Latin American Institute 

B.A., Greensboro College. 

LARRY HANSEL GRANTHAM Instructor in Latin 

American Institute 

SUE MARLENE GUNN, B.S., M.S Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

EARNEST LAWRENCE HARRINGTON, B.S., M.Ed Track Coach, Trainer. 

Equipment Manager, and Instructor in Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi. 

SYLVIA KEATON HENINGTON, B.A Instructor in Health 

and Physical Education 
B.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

CLAIRE HILDERBRAND, B.S., M.S Circulation Librarian 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

MARTHA FRANCES HILL, B.S Assistant Circulation Librarian 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi 

SHERMAN HONG, B.M.Ed., M.Mus.Ed Instructor in Music Education 

B.M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi; M.Mus.Ed., Northwestern University. 

VIRGINIA REDFORD HOPPER, A.B., M.A Instructor in Sociology 

A.B., Oklahoma Baptist University; M.A., Texas Christian University. 

AMELIA IRBY HUDSON, B.S., M.S Instructor in Speech and 

Hearing Sciences 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

OLA MAE HUTCHINSON, B.S., M.S Social Science Librarian 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

GERALDINE YARBOROUGH LAMBRIGHT, B.S, M.S Instructor in 

Mathematics 
B.S., Mississippi State College for Women; M.S., University of Southern Missis- 
sippi. 

EDITH MARIE MITCHELL LANCASTER, B.S, M.S Part-time Instructor 

in Home Economics 
B.S., M.S, University of Southern Mississippi. 

NAN CAROLYN McKEY LEWIS, B.S., M.S Instructor in 

Business Education 
B.S., M.S, University of Southern Mississippi. 

PATRICIA ANNE McRAVEN, B.A, M.A. .. Instructor in English and Literature 
B.A, Little Rock University; M.A., University of Arkansas. 

CHARLES BULLARD MAULDIN, B.S, M.Ed Instructor in 

Science Education 
B.S, M.Ed, Mississippi State University; M.Ed., Harvard University. 

PERRY LOU MILNER, B.S, M.S Instructor in English and Literature 

B.S, M.S, University of Southern Mississippi. 

RUTH GLINDMEYER MOORMAN, A.B, M.A Part-time Instructor in 

Foreign Languages 
A.B., Agnes Scott College; M.A, University of Cincinnati. 

ROLLINS HARRISON NASH, Sergeant Major, U.S.A Instructor in 

Military Science 

JOHN McCALL NORSWORTHY, B.S, M.Ed Instructor in Psychology 

B.S, M.Ed., Mississippi State University. 

HENRY STANLEY PHILLIPS, JR., B.S, M.S Instructor in English and 

Literature 
B.S, M.S, University of Southern Mississippi. 

OLIVER OTTO PHILLIPS, B.S, M.A Instructor in Elementary Education 

B.S., M.A., pre-doctoral study, University of Southern Mississippi . 



33 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



ELNA JO CROSS PIERCE, B.S Instructor in Nursing Program, 

Natchez Resident Center 
B.S., Northwestern State College of Louisiana. 

CARRIE LOUISE PORTER, A.B., M.A Instructor in English 

A.B., Mississippi State College for Women; M.A., University of Alabama. 

MICHAEL ROBERT RATHBUN, B.S Part-time Instructor in Physics 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

JERRY BENNETT REEVES, B.S., M.B.A Instructor in Management 

B.S., M.B.A. , University of Southern Mississippi. 

DONALD EUGENE RILEY, B.S., M.S Part-time Instructor in 

Computer Science and Statistics 
B.S., M.S., State University of Iowa. 

MYRAH NORINE WATKINS RILEY, B.A., M.A Instructor in English 

and Literature 

B.A., M.A., post-graduate study, University of Southern Mississippi. 

JAMES ARTHUR ROBERTSON, JR., B.S., M.S.. .Instructor in Political Science 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

HOWARD NOAH ROGERS, B.A., M.A Instructor in History, 

Biloxi and Harrison County Resident Centers 
B.A., Franklin College; M.A., Indiana University. 

YSIDRO SALINAS, B.S., M.S Instructor in Industrial Arts 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern Misssissippi. 

AUBREY CECIL SANFORD, B.S., M.B.A Instructor in Management 

B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

'JANET CORNELL TERRESON SIMS, B.A., M.A Instructor in English 

and Literature 

B.A., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

BROOKS EUGENE SMITH, B.S., M.B.A Instructor in Economics 

B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

PAULINE ROGERS STOUT, A.B., M.A Research and Editorial Assistant 

to the President and Instructor in History 
A.B., Concord College; M.A., University of North Carolina. 

WALTER RAY STREBECK, B.A., M.S Instructor in English and Literature 

B.A., William Carey College; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

JOHN STEPHEN SZILASI, B.S., M.BA Instructor in Marketing 

B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

BETTIE McGOWAN TAYLOR, B.S., M.A Instructor in Accounting 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., Florida State University. 

WILLIS TERRY, B.S., M.A Instructor in Health and Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

BETTY TAYLOR THOMPSON, B.S., M.S Instructor in Health and 

Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee. 

3 JANE SHELL PLUMMER VAUGHAN, B.S.N Part-time Instructor in 

Nursing Natchez Resident Center 

B.S.N. , Northwestern State College. 

DAVID LAIRD WAITE, B.S Instructor in Radio and Television 

B.S., University of Oregon. 



34 



Instructional and Administrative Staffs 



2 MARTHA JANE PENTECOST WEATHERFORD, B.A., M.A Instructor in 

English and Literature 
B.A., Cumberland University; M.A., University of Alabama. 

HARRY SUE WEBB, B.S Instructor in School for Deaf 

and Aphasic Children 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

MARGARET LOUISE WILLIAMS, B.S., M.S., .Assistant Reference Librarian 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Louisiana State University. 

CARL LESTER WILLIS, B.A Instructor in Journalism 

B.A., Ouachita Baptist University; graduate study, University of Missouri. 

THORNTON WILSON WILLIS, B.S., M.A Instructor in Art 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., University of Alabama. 

DONALD EUGENE WITHROW, Sergeant First Class, U.S.A Instructor in 

Military Science 
'Leave of Absence 1966-67. 
2 Appointed Winter Quarter. 
3 Resigned end of Fall Quarter. 
4 On leave Spring Quarter. 

STAFF MEMBERS 

JAMES ALTON BERRY, B.S Assistant Football Coach 

KATHERINE INDIA BROWN, B.A., M.A Coordinator of Armed 

Forces Education 

LINDA RYAN BUCKLEY, B.S Assistant to the Dean of Women 

WALTER OLIVER CONN, B.S,, M.S Director of Student Aid 

and Scholarships 

CHARLES HAMPTON COOK, B.S., M.A Assistant Football Coach 

BETTY GILLIS COOLEY, B.S Cashier, Business Office 

HORACE BYRD DICKERSON, B.S., M.S Assistant Dean of Men 

ROBERT WILLIAM DUBAY, B.S Supervisor of Men's Housing 

LEE PAUL FLOYD, B.A Head Basketball Coach 

BAKER MOONEY FERRELL Director of University Commons 

JESSE AUSTIN GORE Manager, University Bookstore 

BILLY LEON GREEN, B.S Supervisor of Data Processing 

WILLIAM BONDURANT HALL, B.A., M.S Director of Jackson Resident 

Center 
MARGARET BARKER HARTFIELD, B.S.. .Secretary, Dean of the University 
ALVIS CLAYTON JOHNSON, B.S., LL.B., M.A.. .Director of Special Services, 

Division of Continuing Education 

ANNIE BET J, JONES, R.N Supervising Nurse, Student Health Services 

CECIL MARSHALL KLUTTS, B.S Purchasing Agent 

ALMA SAUCIER LADNER, B.S., M.A., M.Ed Assistant Director 

of Correspondence 

MAXIE TIMOTHY LAMBRIGHT, B.S Assistant Football Coach 

JAMES GILBERT LANGDON, B.S., M.S Assistant Registrar 

GRACE LEWIS MOORE, B.S., M.Ed Credits Counselor, Registrar's Office 

JESSIE HAGLER MORRISON, B.S Executive Secretary, 

Office of the President 

WILLIE VERNON OUBRE, B.S Director of Campus Security 

GEORGE BARNEY POOLE, B.S., M.Ed Assistant Football Coach 

KENNETH ELMO SMITH, B.B.A., M.S., C.P.A Chief Accountant 

DELIA WEDDINGTON STEWART Director of Dixie Darlings 

CELESTAIN JOSEPH PETER TAYLOR, B.S., M.S Assistant Athletic 

Director and Head Baseball Coach 
HARRY MILTON THOMAS, B.S., M. A.. .Supervisor of Buildings Maintenance 

P. W. UNDERWOOD, B.S Assistant Football Coach 

THAD VANN, B.S Head Football Coach 

RHODA REYNOLDS WILLIAMS Director of Campus Post Office 



35 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Historical 

Purposes 

Application Procedures 

Student Community 

Student Expenses 

Student Aid 

Latin American Institute 

Alumni Association 

Library 
Placement Bureau 



3 6 



General Information 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Historical 

A great educational awakening in the South became apparent near the 
beginning of the twentieth century. The obvious need for better educated 
teachers for all the public schools of Mississippi and the organized efforts of 
the State Teachers Association culminated during the legislative session of 1910 
in an enabling act establishing the Mississippi Normal College. Since its open- 
ing in the fall of 1912, this institution has existed under four names. In 1924 
the name was changed to State Teachers College. In 1940 it became Mississippi 
Southern College. And on February 27, 1962, the institution was named the 
University of Southern Mississippi. 

The first Board of Trustees made broad and far reaching plans for the new 
institution. The generosity of Forrest County and Hattiesburg in offering 
$260,000 in cash, 840 acres of land, and other valuable considerations for the 
privilege of having the college located in Hattiesburg made it possible for the 
newly elected president, Joseph Anderson Cook, and the Board to begin the 
construction of buildings. Before the opening in the fall of 1912, five permanent 
buildings (all of which have been renovated and are still in use) were com- 
pleted: the president's home, College Hall, two dormitories — Hattiesburg Hall 
for women and Forrest County Hall for men, and an industrial cottage for girls 
(now the Speech and Hearing Science Building). 

As the University has grown in numbers, it has also expanded its physical 
facilities. Between 1912 and the outbreak of World War II, the college added 
many buildings. This was the physical plant that was taxed to the limit when 
World War II veterans entered the college in 1946. Construction since World 
War II totaling more than $14,000,000 has been completed, and there are now 
more than 60 permanent buildings on the campus. An ambitious program of 
future physical expansion for the University is in the planning stage for an 
anticipated student body of 15,000. 

The progress of the University cannot be measured in terms of the ex- 
pansion of physical plant alone. A student body of 230 eager young men and 
women and a faculty of 18 were present on the day of the opening exercises, 
September 18, 1912. For the Fall Quarter of 1966 there were over 7,000 students 
and a full-time faculty of 325. 

The first course of study, prescribed by legislative enactment, consisted 
of a certificate course and a diploma course. The rapid development of high 
schools called for a higher course of study at Mississippi Normal College, and 
in 1922 the legislature authorized the college to grant degrees. By 1929 the 
College had dropped the diploma and certificate course. In 1929 the College 
was admitted to the American Association of Teachers Colleges and accredited 
by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. By World War 
II the College offered, in addition to its elementary and secondary educa- 
tion degree programs, the Bachelor of Music degree, the Bachelor 
of Arts degree, pre-medical, pre-legal, and pre-pharmacy programs, and was 
certified for vocational home economics training. In late 1939, the Hattiesburg 
Chamber of Commerce adopted as its project the changing of the name from 
State Teachers College to Mississippi Southern College. In the legislative 
session of 1940 this purpose was achieved, and the institution became in name 
what it had partially already become in fact: a multiple-purpose institution. 
In 1947, the Board of Institutions of Higher Learning in Mississippi author- 
ized the College to give one year of graduate work leading to the degree of 
Master of Arts in Education. The work of the graduate school has been 
expanded over the past two decades. At present, the University offers the 
doctorate in several fields and a master's degree in many of the subject matter 
fields (see the Graduate Bulletin for specific degrees). 

Research has been strengthened at the University of Southern Mississippi 
in several ways: the number of doctoral degrees has been increased; the 
University has established its own scholarly journal — the Southern Quarterly; 



37 



General Information 



library research- materials have been greatly increased; the Computer Center 
has been equipped to expedite contracts and faculty research; and the Office 
of Research and Projects has been established by the University to promote 
research and to assist faculty members in their research activities. For further 
information on the University's research program, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

The expansion of the academic offerings of the institution necessitated 
the re- evaluation of the administrative system of the University. This had 
remained virtually unchanged since 1912. The University is now organized 
into two colleges, five schools, and two divisions. These are subdivided into 
departments, and the addition of new departments, the employment of new 
faculty members with superior training, and the general development of 
academic standards have all played a part in making the University of Southern 
Mississippi the modern multiple-purpose institution it is today. 

The men most responsible for the growth of the University have been 
those individuals entrusted by the Board of Trustees with the administration 
of the institution as president. The University has had six presidents: 

Joseph Anderson Cook, A.B., 1912-1928 

Claude Bennett, A.B., A.M., 1928-1933 

Jennings Burton George, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., 1933-1945 

Robert Cecil Cook, B.S., M.A., Ed.D., 1945-1955 

Richard Aubrey McLemore, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Acting President 
January 1 to September 1, 1955 

William David McCain, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., 1955- 

PURPOSES OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The University of Southern Mississippi was founded for the purpose of 
serving the people of Mississippi. The University offers outstanding courses 
in liberal arts, education, pre-professional fields, fine arts, and many practical 
fields of knowledge. The faculty, library, laboratories, classrooms, special 
clinics, and student welfare services are equal to those in other colleges and 
universities in the United States. 

Although the University is primarily concerned with resident teaching, 
it reaches, through various extension and resident centers, workshops, and 
the correspondence courses, citizens in all parts of Mississippi and in various 
other parts of the world. 

The University is proud of the friendly relationship between students and 
faculty members, and an effort is made to work with students as individuals 
in their educational, social, and religious development. 

The purposes of the University as developed by the administration and the 
faculty are as follows: 

1. To have a highly trained faculty, an imaginative, sympathetic, and 
understanding administration, an efficient and cooperative staff, loyal and active 
alumni, adequate equipment, and high academic standards. 

2. To educate in the acquiring of knowledge, skills, disciplines, moral and 
ethical values and humanistic ideals, and in the attaining of a dignified, hon- 
est, and alert citizenship. 

3. To base education on a sound and thorough understanding of the tra- 
ditional and liberal areas of human knowledge. ' 

4. To provide, together with counseling and guidance, a well-rounded 
program of activities for the purpose of developing in each student a well- 
balanced personality. 

5. To provide areas of development in professional and vocational educa- 
tion in accordance with facilities of the University. 

6. To develop in students the highest types of social graces. 

7. To give each student an understanding of the nature and the funda- 
mental problems of the physical world in which he lives and the moral and 
intellectual knowledge that will enable him to adjust himself to, or change, 
the environment in which he lives. 



3» 



Admission Requirements 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES 

Requirements for entering freshmen: 

1. The applicant must be a graduate of an accredited secondary school, 
must present sixteen acceptable units of secondary school credit, and must 
present a minimum of twelve units in college preparatory subjects such as 
English, foreign language, history and social studies, mathematics, and physical 
or biological sciences. A score of at least 15 on an appropriate sub-test of the 
American College Test may permit a waiver of the minimum requirement of 
units in a subject area. 

2. The applicant must have a composite standard score on the American 
College Test of at least 15. No other test or tests may be accepted as a substitute 
for the American College Test without permission of the Director of Admissions. 

3. Special consideration may be given to applicants with fifteen acceptable 
units of secondary school credit who, although they have not graduated from 
high school, have extremely high scores on examinations determined by the 
Director of Admissions. 

4. An applicant who has not graduated from high school and who is at least 
twenty years of age may be admitted on the basis of successful completion of 
a general educational development test (high school level) if all other admission 
criteria are met. 

Requirements for transfer students: 

(In the following, a C average shall mean a 2. average based on a four 
point quality point system.) 

1. The applicant must be eligible to return, in good standing, to the institu- 
tion last attended. Applicants who have been suspended from the last college 
attended are ineligible for admission to the University of Southern Mississippi. 

2. Transfer applicants from other Mississippi colleges or universities must 
present academic averages of at least C in order to enter in good standing. 
Applicants with averages of less than C may be given consideration for 
admission on academic probation if their ACT scores are satisfactory. 

3. Transfer applicants from colleges or universities outside Mississippi must 
present academic averages of at least C in order to be admitted. 

4. All transfer applicants must present their American College Test scores. 

5. Transfer students from other Mississippi institutions who are admitted 
with an over- all academic average of less than C will be placed on academic 
probation, and courses on which grades of D have been made will not be 
accepted for transfer. All courses attempted at prior institutions will be con- 
sidered in determining the student's over-all average. 

Limitation on Transfer of Credits: 

Not more than 99 quarter hours (66 semester hours) may be transferred 
from a junior college. If a transfer student has earned a total of 99 quarter 
hours in combined junior and senior college or other credits, no additional 
credit will be accepted from a iunior college. No former students of the 
University of Southern Mississippi will be allowed to transfer credits earned 
at a junior college once they have earned a total of 99 quarter hours from all 
sources. In the 192-quarter-hour minimum requirement for a baccalaureate 
degree, at least 96 hours must be earned in a senior college. 

A maximum of 96 quarter hours of credit earned through correspondence 
courses, extension courses, and educational experiences in the armed forces 
combined may be counted toward a degree at the University of Southern 
Mississippi. No more than 48 quarter hours earned by correspondence and/or 
extension may be used. 

Limitation on Acceptance of Military Credit: 

1. No credit is awarded for the General Educational Development Tests, 
College Level. 



39 



General Information 



2. No credit is awarded for completion of non- enrolled courses through 
the United States Armed Forces Institute. Only correspondence courses are 
accepted through that source. 

3. Credit for educational experiences in the armed forces may be awarded 
on the basis of recommendations of the American Council on Education. 

4. A maximum of 96 quarter hours from military schools may be used 
toward a degree, provided the student has no correspondence or extension 
credit. 

Requirements for military personnel: the "Bootstrap" program: 

Military personnel on active duty who attend the University on the "Boot- 
strap" program may complete degree requirements with 40 quarter hours of 
work on the Hattiesburg campus, provided all other degree requirements have 
been fulfilled. This amount of work may be done in two quarters (six calendar 
months), but many students attend on nine-month or year programs. Grad- 
uate students will, of course, have to attend for at least three quarters since 
they may transfer only nine quarter hours from another institution. 

In order to receive an official evaluation of credits to determine eligibility 
for "Bootstrap" attendance, the following educational credentials must be for- 
warded: 

1. A properly executed military Form DD 295. 

2. Official transcripts bearing the college seal from each institution pre- 
viously attended. 

3. Official transcripts of correspondence courses completed through the 
United States Armed Forces Institute, Madison, Wisconsin. 

4. Official high school transcript. 

5. An application for admission should be submitted with the request for 
evaluation. 

All documents and correspondence should be directed to: 
Miss Katherine Brown 
Coordinator of Armed Forces Education 
University of Southern Mississippi 
Southern Station, Box 6, Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 

When eligibility for "Bootstrap" attendance has been determined, the stu- 
dent is required to submit five recommendations and a medical examination 
form before the letter of acceptance can be written. 

Requirements for foreign students: regular University programs: 

1. Foreign students without previous records at colleges or universities 
within the United States must meet the requirements outlined above for ad- 
mission as freshmen with the exception of the American College Test require- 
ment. 

2. Foreign students who have already attended colleges or universities 
within the United States must meet the requirements outlined above for ad- 
mission as transfer students. 

3. All applicants who are not citizens of an English-speaking country 
must furnish the Director of Admissions with a satisfactory score on the Test 
of English As a Foreign Language (TOEFL) . Information about this test can 
be obtained from Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, 
USA. Because it normally requires several months to process all necessary 
documents, foreign students are urged to apply for admission as early as pos- 
sible. A ten-dollar, non-refundable fee must accompany the application for 
admission of each foreign student. 



40 



Application Procedures 



Requirements for foreign students: The Latin American Institute, 

Students interested in attending The Latin American Institute at the Uni- 
versity of Southern Mississippi for intensified studies in English should direct 
all correspondence to: 

Mr. Ralph M. Siverio, Director 

The Latin American Institute 

University of Southern Mississippi 

Southern Station, Box 65, Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 

Special, non-degree-seeking students in the regular University: 

In rare instances where a student desires to take a limited amount of 
course work for a special purpose and not for a degree, the Director of Admis- 
sions might grant permission as a special student. Inquiries should be directed 
to the Director of Admissions. 

Correspondence Courses, Resident and Extension Centers: 

Students interested in enrolling in correspondence courses or courses at 
resident and extension centers should write the Dean of the Division of Con- 
tinuing Education, Dr. P. C. Morgan, University of Southern Mississippi, South- 
ern Station, Post Office Box 55, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

In making application for admission to the regular University the following 
procedures must be followed: 

1. Write to the Director of Admissions, Southern Station, Box 11, Hatties- 
burg, Mississippi 39401, for undergraduate application materials. 

2. Complete the application form, medical examination record, and obtain 
the recommendation signatures on the form provided. Return these items to 
the Director of Admissions before the deadline date of the quarter for which 
you are applying. 

3. Furnish your high school principal with the transcript request form in 
order that he may release your high school transcript to the Director of Admis- 
sions (a partial transcript should be mailed showing your work completed 
through the first semester of your senior high school year with a supplementary 
transcript mailed after you have graduated). If you are applying for admission 
as a transfer student you must request the registrar at each college or university 
previously attended to furnish the Director of Admissions with a transcript 
of your credits. An official transcript must be submitted from each college or 
university attended even though all of your credits may be posted to the 
transcript at the last institution attended. 

4. Scores from the American College Test must be received before action 
can be taken on your application. The ACT information sheet supplied with 
the application materials furnishes the dates and places of testing and test 
registration instructions. 

5. All credentials must be received by the Director of Admissions showing 
a postmark no later than midnight of the final day for submitting applications. 
The application deadline dates are listed in the Calendar at the front of this 
Bulletin. 

6. The academic record, character, and conditions of application of the 
applicant must be in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Board 
of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning and with the laws of the 
State of Mississippi. The applicant must have excellent moral character in 
conformity with the generally accepted standards customarily in effect in the 
University. 

7. Applicants should note carefully the law governing legal residence and 
the penalty for falsifying residence information. The law appears in the 
"Student Expenses" section of this Bulletin. 



4 i 



General Information 



8. The University of Southern Mississippi does not discriminate on grounds 
of race, color, or national origin. 

ORIENTATION 

For the fall and summer quarters of each year, a required orientation 
program is provided for all new undergraduate students. The Certificate of 
Admission, which is issued by the Director of Admissions, provides reporting 
instructions for the first orientation activity. All new students are expected 
to be prompt in reporting as directed on the Certificate of Admission. 

The orienation programs are designed to acquaint students with the 
administrative officers of the University, the rules and regulations, the physical 
plant, and the registration procedure. In addition, new students are assigned 
to academic advisers and are given specific times to meet with their advisers 
for assistance in scheduling classes and planning programs of study. 

STUDENT COUNSELING 

The Office of Student Counseling provides many guidance services without 
charge to the student. Many find that a visit to this office is invaluable in 
solving problems that arise in university living. Counselors are available to 
assist the student in choosing a college major, making a vocational choice, 
solving personal and social problems, overcoming educational deficiencies, and 
finding solutions to premarital and marital difficulties. 

When appropriate, the student and the counselor may select tests to 
appraise abilities, interests, or personality characteristics. A library of educa- 
tional and occupational information is maintained. College catalogues from 
other institutions and many books and pamphlets on educational and personal 
adjustment are also available. 

Counseling is usually initiated by the student. Appointments with a coun- 
selor may be made by phone (266-7119), or in person. The office is located in 
Room 201 of the Student Services Building, and is open from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 
noon and 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on week days. Saturday office hours are 8:30 
a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

THE STUDENT COMMUNITY: 

CAMPUS LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS 

Students not living in their homes should arrange to live on the campus. 
Reservations may be made by sending $15.00 to the Director of Housing. Students 
who wish to room together should indicate such information on their reserva- 
tion request. Room reservations are accepted subject to the approval of applica- 
tion for admission to the University. Students already living in the dormitory 
rooms will be given until May 1 to make reservations. After that date, space is 
reserved in the order in which applications are received. Room assignments are 
mailed about a month before the quarter begins. ROOM DEPOSIT WILL BE RE- 
FUNDED IF RESERVATION IS CANCELED TEN DAYS PRIOR TO THE 
OPENING OF THE QUARTER FOR WHICH THE RESERVATION IS MADE. 

A student accepting a room in a residence hall will be financially obligated 
in accordance with the housing contract. A refund of unused room rent will be 
made only in accordance with the housing contract. Upon admission to the resi- 
dence hall the student will contribute to the "Dorm Fund" which is used to 
maintain a TV, pay for Homecoming decorations, courtesies, etc. 

Rooms are equipped with the following furniture: single beds with com- 
fortable innerspring mattresses, a dresser or a chest of drawers, chairs, and 
study tables. Students must furnish all linens, bed coverings, pillows, and cur- 
tains. All dormitories are air-conditioned or equipped with an air -ventilating 
system. All university buildings (classroom, dormitory, administration, and 
apartment) are subject to periodic safety inspections. 



42. 



Health and Safety Services 



Lodging in the fraternity houses is available to fraternity members. Ar- 
rangements are made directly with the presidents of the fraternities. The 
fraternity presidents will furnish the Director of Housing with official lists of 
students living in their houses each quarter. 

Pine Haven Apartments, consisting of 296 one, two, and three-bedroom 
unfurnished units, are available on the campus for faculty and married students. 
A $15.00 deposit is required at the time of application and is refundable if the 
request is canceled thirty (30) days prior to the date for which the application 
was made. 

Two new off-campus dormitories are now open. Elam Arms, a dormitory 
for men, is located on Hardy Street at the southern boundary of the campus 
across from the Fine Arts Building. A dormitory for women, Hillcrest, is 
located at the northern boundary of the campus alongside US Highway 49. 
These two facilities represent the latest and finest developments in dormitory 
construction and furnishings; they are approved by the University, and are 
available to all students without regard to academic classification. Descriptive 
brochures are available through the University Housing Office. These two 
privately financed dormitories have their own dining facilities. 

All undergraduate students are required to live on campus (Elam Arms 
and Hillcrest dormitories are considered on campus) if they are not living at 
home or with relatives. If space is not available on campus, undergraduate 
students will be referred to approved off-campus residences by the Housing 
Office. Sorority members are expected to live in the Panhellenic Dormitory. 
Behavior of students permitted to live off campus must be such that they are 
acceptable citizens of the community. 

The above restrictions on housing are not applicable to married students 
or graduate students. 

The dormitory lobbies which serve as social and recreational centers are 
supplemented by the R. C. Cook University Union Building. This building 
contains a lounge, a gameroom, a ballroom, a television lounge, the University 
photograph service, offices for religious organizations and student government, 
and meeting rooms for other organizations, as well as five guest rooms, which are 
rented at a nominal fee to parents and other visitors to the campus. Students use 
the facilities of the University Union Building for games, music, enjoyment, 
social, and religious activities, and other cultural and recreational purposes. 
Private dining rooms in the University Commons may be used by clubs and 
organizations for banquets, dinners, and teas. 

The University Commons serves well-planned, attractive meals at moderate 
prices. Special diets may be arranged at a small extra charge. 

HEALTH AND SAFETY SERVICES 

The health and safety record of the University is an enviable one. The health 
education program, which aims at teaching each person how to assume responsi- 
bility for safeguarding his health, is supplemented by the health services 
which the University offers. 

A medical examination blank is given the student at the time he applies 
for admission to the University. The student should have the medical examina- 
tion done by his family physician and should return the completed medical 
examination form to the University along with his application for admission. It 
is urged that any defects noted in the examination be corrected prior to the 
beginning of the session in which the student will enroll. The University re- 
serves the right to require a medical examination of any student at any time. 
No student's admission is complete without a medical examination. 

The University Clinic is a well-equipped infirmary in which the ordinary 
illnesses occuring during the university year, but not during the vacation or 
recess periods, are cared for by the university physician and nurses. Students 



43 



General Information 



with more serious illnesses or injuries, or those in need of immediate surgery, 
are referred to the regular hospitals in Hattiesburg. Such serious illnesses, in- 
juries, and operations, together with hospital and medical care in private hos- 
pitals, can not be the responsibility of the University. The Clinic services are 
available only to full-time students. 

The university physician has regular office hours for free consultation with 
students. A nursing staff is on duty twenty-four hours a day. 

AUTOMOBILES ON CAMPUS 

Students and employees of the University are required to register with the 
Department of Campus Security automobiles which are operated on the cam- 
pus. Temporary permits are issued when the automobile is to be on the campus 
less than seven days. Parking zones have been established along with other 
regulations. A pamphlet, which outlines Traffic and Parking Regulations, may 
be secured from the Department of Campus Security. Penalties are assessed 
for violation of regulations and persistent violators are denied the privilege of 
operating an automobile on campus. A policy showing minimum liability in- 
surance (5-10-5) required by Mississippi state law must be presented at the 
time of registration. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The functions of the Student Government Association composed of all 
registered resident students at The University of Southern Mississippi are "to 
insure a continuous exchange of ideas and opinions between the students and 
the administration, to secure valuable training and experience in democratic 
self-government, to assume the fullest powers and responsibilities of self- 
government consistent with the constitution and laws of the State of Mississippi 
and the policies of the president of this institution, to promote the genera] 
student welfare, and to protect the herein enumerated rights of students." 

There are three branches of student government: the legislative, the execu- 
tive, and the judicial. The executive officers and the members of the legislative 
branch, the Student Senate, are elected by direct vote of the students. The 
justices of the Student Court are appointed by the President of Student Gov- 
ernment subject to approval by the Student Senate. 

Many functions of student government are carried out by standing com- 
mittees, chief of which are the Committee on Social Life, the Elections Com- 
mittee, and the Executive Committee. 

The local government unit in each dormitory is called the Dormitory Coun- 
cil. These councils are coordinated by the Men's Affairs Board and Women's 
Affairs Board and regulate all matters relating to dormitory life. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

THE STUDENT PRINTZ, winner of many national awards, is the Univer- 
sity newspaper published semi -weekly by a staff of students under the direction 
of faculty advisers. THE SOUTHERNER is a yearly publication, published by a 
student staff under the direction of a faculty adviser. The DRAWL, a handbook 
for students, is published by the Student Government Association. The TELE- 
PHONE DIRECTORY, published by the University Union, a student staff, and 
an adviser, gives a complete list of telephone numbers and mail addresses of 
students, faculty, and staff of the University, together with a buying guide of 
the Hattiesburg and Gulf Coast areas. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

The University of Southern Mississippi is a state supported school and is 
entirely non-sectarian. Religious life is encouraged, and every effort is made to 
cooperate with local churches. The Student Christian Federation unifies the 



44 



Organizations 



activities of all religious groups on the campus. Its executive council is composed 
of two elected representatives of the student body, who serve as chairman and 
vice chairman, five appointed officers, and a representative from each active 
religious organization. The Student Christian Federation seeks to provide 
channels for worship and religious development. It sponsors the all-campus 
Religious Emphasis Programs, a Thanksgiving Service, an Easter Sunrise 
Service, and an annual Christmas Tree Lighting. 

The Wesley Foundation, the Baptist Student Union, the Westminster Fel- 
lowship, the Newman Club, the Canterbury Club, the Martin Luther Fellow- 
ship, and the Christian Church Group are among the organized and active 
student denominational groups. 

The Danforth Chapel is a place of prayer and meditation for all. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

General Honor Societies — There are six general honor societies on the 
campus. A general honor society is an association that receives into member- 
ship individuals who have achieved high scholarship and who fulfill such 
additional requirements of distinction in some broad field of education and 
culture or in general leadership as the society has established. Pi Kappa Pi is 
a national honorary society composed of men and women who have made grades 
of A on seventy per cent of their work while earning ninety consecutive 
quarter hours of credit. Membership in Pi Kappa Pi is the highest recognition 
for scholarship accorded at the University. Omicron Delta Kappa is a national 
honorary leadership society, membership in which is the highest recognition 
accorded men students of the University. Phi Eta Sigma is a national society 
which aims to encourage and reward high scholastic attainment among freshman 
men. Phi Delta Rho is a local honorary leadership society, membership in which 
is the highest recognition accorded women students of the University. Alpha 
Lambda Delta is a national society which aims to encourage and reward high 
scholastic attainment among freshman women. The Druid's Society is an honor 
society for sophomore women. 

Academic Honor Societies — Other national honorary or professional organi- 
zations having chapters on the campus include Alpha Epsilon Alpha (account- 
ing), Alpha Epsilon Delta (pre-medical), Alpha Psi Omega (dramatics), Ameri- 
can Chemical Society Student Affiliate, Beta Beta Beta (biology), Delta Sigma 

Pi (business), Home Economics Club, Iota Lambda Sigma (industrial arts) 
KapDa Delta Pi (education), Kappa Kappa Psi (band), Kappa Mu Epsilon 
(mathematics) , Kappa Omicron Phi (home economics) , Kappa Pi (art) , Lambda 
Iota Tau (literature), Mu Phi Epsilon (music), Phi Alpha Theta (history), Phi 
Delta Kappa (education), Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia (music), Pi Gamma Mu 
(social studies), Pi Kappa Delta (forensics), Pi Omega Pi (business education), 
Pi Sigma Epsilon (marketing). Sigma Alpha Eta (speech therapy), Tau Beta 
Sigma (band), Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), Psi Chi (psychology). 

Other Honorary and Academic Organizations — Other organizations among 

the students include Alpha Phi Omega, Circle K Club, Collegiate Civitan Club, 
4-H Club, Geology Club, German Club, Graduate Club, International Relations 
Club, Le Cercle Francais, "M" Club, Pan American Students Association, 
Physics Club, Pi Tau Chi (religious honorary), Recreation Club, Scabbard and 
Blade Society. Student National Education Association, Women's Physical Edu- 
cation Club, Yellow jackets. 

Dramatic, Musical, and Other Performing Groups — The University's pre- 
eminence in the Fine Arts fields of theatre and music is reflected in the promi- 
nent role of student performing groups. The Debate Squad and the University's 
own radio station also encourage student performance. 

THE SOUTHERN PLAYERS, open to all students of the University, is the 
campus dramatic organization which serves as a vehicle for Department of 
Theatre productions. 



45 



General Information 



THE CHORAL UNION, composed of students from the entire University, 
meets one evening a week to perform the great works in choral literature, both 
sacred and secular. 

THE OPERA WORKSHOP, open to all students of the University, performs 
many works of musico- dramatic interest during the year. 

THE UNIVERSITY SINGERS, auditions for which are held during the first 
week of each quarter, give numerous concerts and tours. There is usually a 
waiting list of applicants for membership. Within the UNIVERSITY SINGERS 
are a number of smaller ensembles, such as the Madrigal Singers and various 
male and female groups. 

The University's bands and orchestras have an outstanding record of service 
to the University and the State. 

THE CONCERT BAND, which gives several formal concerts each year, is 
made up of selected student musicians. 

THE DIXIE DARLINGS, drawn from the University's best girl dancers, 
are as well known as the Marching Band to national television audiences. 

THE HIGHLANDERS are a marching group of bagpipers, drummers, 
singers, and dancers who provide unique embellishment to programs both on 
and off the campus. 

THE MARCHING BAND, open to any regularly enrolled student, has en- 
hanced the dignity and reputation of the University at many nationally televised 
events. 

THE ROTC BAND is an important part of the ROTC program. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI SYMPHONY, onen to 
all students and faculty members of the University also, gives a number of 
concerts each year in addition to assisting with oratorios and operas. 

THE VARSITY BAND serves as a laboratory band for student composers 
and conductors. 

THE WIND AND PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE retains the basic instrumenta- 
tion of a symphonic band, although in almost every instance using only one 
player per part. 

Scholarships in all these musical grouos are available to talented students. 
Auditions may be arranged through the Dean of the School of Fine Arts. 

The University's Debate Squad, recognized as one of the nation's best, is 
open to all students. 

WMSU, the University's own radio station, is an affiliate of NBC. The award- 
winning station encourages participation by any interested student regardless 
of major. 

Social Fraternities — Eight social fraternities hold membership in the In- 
terfraternity Council of the University. They are Acacia, Alpha Tau Omega, 
Kappa Aloha, Kappa Sigma, Pi Kappa Alpha, Phi Kappa Tau, Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon, and Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Social Sororities — Eight social sororities hold membership in the Pan- 
hellenic Council of the University. They are Alpha Sigma Alpha, Chi Omega, 
Delta Delta Delta, Delta Zeta, Kappa Delta, Phi Mu, Pi Beta Phi, and Sigma 
Sigma Sigma. 

ATHLETICS 

The University of Southern Mississippi is a member of the National Colle- 
giate Athletic Association. 

Intercollegiate sports are football, basketball, baseball, tennis, and golf. 
Seasonal intramural sports under the supervision of personnel from the 



4 6 



University Union 



Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation give every student 
an opportunity to take part in competition. Among the sports included on 
the program are tennis, golf, water sports, touch football, basketball, softball, 
table tennis, badminton, volleyball, horseshoes, handball, track, and swimming. 

The university golf course, tennis courts, swimming pool, playgrounds, and 
gymnasium facilities are available to all students. 

R. C. COOK UNIVERSITY UNION 

The center of student activities at the University of Southern Mississippi 
is the R. C. Cook University Union, which houses many of the student organiza- 
tion offices as well as offices of the Alumni Association. 

Operating from the Union is the University Information Center, which 
serves as a locating service for students twenty-four hours a day. The Union 
buiiding is open from 7:30 A.M. to 10:30 P.M. daily. 

The Union provides for university students a complete program of activities 
plaiined and promoted through the University Activities Council. 

The University Activities Council is made up of representatives from each 
campus organization. UAC activities include bi-weekly movies, dances, parties, 
an annual Halloween Carnival, Welcome Dance, Charity Month, Campus Pac 
Distribution, and the sponsorship of "big name" entertainment. 

The University Union, with its air-conditioned facilities, also serves as a 
conference and workshop center for the campus during the Summer Quarter. 



STUDENT EXPENSES 

A primary objective of the University is to hold to a minimum the expense 
of its students. Changes in fees are made, whenever possible, to benefit the 
students. Increases are made only when required for support of the institution 
or improvement of the activity program of the students. 

Announcements concerning fees and expenses are subject to change with- 
out notice and may not be regarded as binding obligations of the University. 

Fees and expenses are in the form of incidental fees, room and board, and 
special fees. 

INCIDENTAL FEE. This fee is used for general support of the University 
and consists of charges for matriculation, library, textbook service, athletic 
activities, health service, University Union, university newspaper, laboratory, 
concert series, maintenance, etc. Athletic activities, health service and news- 
paper are not included for part-time students. 

Full-time students for purposes of assessing fees are as follows: Graduate 
School, nine or more quarter hours; all other schools, colleges, and divisions, 
twelve or more quarter hours. Students enrolled for more than eighteen hours 
will be assessed the applicable fee for each additional quarter hour. (Students 
training under Veterans Administration programs on the undergraduate level 
are required by the Veterans Administration to carry a minimum of fourteen 
quarter hours for the entire quarter to receive full subsistence.) 

Textbooks, except for textbooks in Foreign Language courses and certain 
other courses, are provided on a loan basis to all undergraduate students. 

Clinical and hospital services covered by the health service charge in- 
cluded in the incidental fee are limited to cases of ordinary illness. Services 



47 



Student Expenses and Financial Aid 



are provided within the limits of the professional, technical, and physical 
resources of the clinic. The University does not assume responsibility in cases 
of extended illness or for treatment of chronic diseases. Cases requiring 
surgery must be handled by a physician and hospital of the student's choice. 

ROOM AND BOARD. The room and board fees are assessed for all stu- 
dents living in University-controlled dormitories and those students living in 
fraternity houses. All students rooming in dormitories or fraternity houses are 
required to take their meals in the University Commons. 

A room deposit of $15.00 is payable in advance for the reservation of 
space in the dormitories. This amount is held as a breakage deposit until a 
student withdraws from the dormitory. 

A student accepting dormitory space will be financially obligated in 
accordance with the housing contract. A refund of the dormitory fee will 
be made only in accordance with the housing contract. 

No reduction in room and board expenses is made for absence of less 
than two continuous weeks, and then only when the absence is necessary 
and is reported to the Business Office in advance. 

OTHER FEE INFORMATION. Fees of all students are due and payable 
at time of registration; however, fees of full-time students may be paid one- 
half upon entrance and the balance one week prior to the beginning of the 
second half of the quarter. 

Transcripts of credits will not be issued for students whose accounts are 
delinquent. 

Students who are permitted to register for correspondence courses in 
residence will be charged a fee of $7.00 per quarter hour. 

A fee of $2.00 is assessed each quarter to all full-time students for opera- 
tion of the University Union. A $1.00 fee is added to the incidental fee assess- 
ment of part-time students. 

Courses requiring special fees and music fees are shown in the Special 
Fee listing (Table II). 

A fee of $6.50 for the Southerner (university annual) is payable on en- 
trance the Fall Quarter by all full-time undergraduate students. 

NON-RESIDENT STATUS. The Legislature of the State of Mississippi has 
passed the following legislation concerning non-resident status: 

The board of trustees of each junior college in this state, the board of 
trustees of state institutions of higher learning, and the administrative authori- 
ties of each institution governed by said boards, in ascertaining and determin- 
ing the legal residence of and tuition to be charged any student applying for 
admission to such institutions, shall be governed by the following definitions 
and conditions: 

Legal residence of a minor. The residence of a person less than twenty-one 
(21) years of age is that of the father. After the death of the father, the resi- 
dence of the minor is that of the mother. If the parents are divorced, the resi- 
dence of the minor is that of the parent who was granted custody by the 
court; or, if custody was not granted, the residence continues to be that of the 
father. If both parents are dead, the residence of the minor is that of the last 
surviving parent at the time of that parent's death, unless the minor lives with 



4 s 



Student Expenses and Financial Aid 



a legal guardian of his person, duly appointed by a proper court of Mississippi, 
in which case his residence becomes that of the guardian. 

Legal residence of an adult. The residence of an adult is that place where he is 
domiciled, that is, the place where he actually physically resides with the in- 
tention of remaining there indefinitely or of returning there permanently when 
temporarily absent. 

Removal of parents from Mississippi. If the parents of a minor who is enrolled 
as a student in an institution of higher learning move their legal residence 
from the State of Mississippi, the minor is immediately classified as a non- 
resident student. 

Twelve months of residence required. No student may be admitted to any 
institution of higher learning as a resident of Mississippi unless his residence, 
as defined hereinabove, has been in the State of Mississippi for a continuous 
period of at least twelve (12) months immediately preceding his admission. 

Residence in an educational institution not counted. A person who has entered 
the State of Mississippi from another state and enters an educational institu- 
tion within twelve (12) months is considered a non-resident. For this reason, 
any period of time when such a person is enrolled in any educational institu- 
tion in Mississippi may not be counted as any part of the twelve (12) months 
prerequisite to his admission to an institution of higher learning as a resident 
student. Even though he may have been legally adopted by a resident of Mis- 
sissippi, or may have been a qualified voter, or a landowner, or may otherwise 
have sought to establish legal residence, such a person will still be considered 
as being a non-resident of Mississippi if he has entered this state for the 
purpose of enrolling in an educational institution. 

Residence status of a married woman. A married woman may claim the resi- 
dence status of her husband, or she may claim independent residence status 
under the same regulations, set forth above, as any other adult. 

Children of parents who are employed by institutions of higher learning. Chil- 
dren of parents who are members of the faculty or staff of any institution 
under the jurisdiction of the board of trustees may be classified as residents 
during the time that their parents are such faculty or staff members without 
regard to the residence requirement of twelve (12) months, for the purpose of 
attendance at the institution where their parents are faculty or staff members. 

Aliens. All aliens are classified as non-residents. 

Students holding scholarships and fellowships. Non-resident students holding 
scholarships, fellowships, and graduate assistantships will not be required to 
pay the non-resident fee during the time that they hold these appointments. 

REFUND POLICY. A student who officially withdraws after enrollment 
may obtain a refund in accordance with the following: 

a. A refund of 90% of incidental and special fees paid will be made to a 
student who v/ithdraws within eight (8) days following the last calendar day 
of registration. 

b. A full-time student who withdraws for any reason prior to midterm of 
any quarter but following eight (8) days after the last calendar day of regis- 
tration will be refunded 50% of the incidental and special fees. 

c. A full-time student who withdraws after midterm of any quarter will 
not be entitled to a refund of fees. 



49 



General Information 



d. A part-time student will not be entitled to a refund of fees after eight 
(8) days from the last calendar day of registration. 

e. A student enrolled for evening classes will receive no refund unless 
withdrawal is made prior to the second meeting of the class. 

f. No adjustment of incidental and special fees will be made when courses 
are dropped after eight (8) days from date of registration. 

g. Room and board fees are refunded on the basis of full weeks remaining 
in the quarter. 



TABLE I 

EXPENSES EACH QUARTER 

FULL-TIME STUDENTS 
Fixed Fees 

Incidental fee $104.00 

Room rent — air-conditioned dormitory 85.00 

Room rent — other dormitory 70.00 

Board 84.00 

Other Fees When Applicable 

Non-resident fee $110.00 

The Southerner (Fall Quarter only) 6.50 

Post Office box, per quarter 1.00 

PART-TIME STUDENTS— Each quarter hour 

Incidental fee graduate student $ 12.00 

Incidental fee undergraduate student 9.00 

Non-resident fee 10.00 



TABLE II 

SPECIAL FEES AND EXPENSES 

Departmental Fees: 

Elementary Education 480, 482, each $ 20.00 per course 

Home Economics Education 481, 482, 485, 486, each . . 10.00 per course 

Special Education 480, 481, each 20.00 per course 

Library Science 489 10.00 per course 

Secondary Education 481A, B, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, 

N, P, R, S, V, each 20.00 per course 

Music Fees — Private Lessons for other than full-time music majors: 

1 quarter hour per instructor $ 19.00 per quarter 

2 quarter hours per instructor 36.00 per quarter 

3 quarter hours per instructor 53.00 per quarter 

Each additional supervised lesson 17.00 per quarter 

Orchestral or Band Instrument rental* 6.00 per quarter 



5° 



Student Expenses and Financial Aid 



Summer Conferences and Workshops:** 
Administrators Workshop 
Aviation Education Workshop 
Library Science Workshop 
Reading Conference 
School Lunch Managers Workshop 
Summer Music Camp 

Reading Clinic, Individual Remedial Instructions: 

Special Students (non-credit) $ 20.00 per 4-week period 

Complete Reading Diagnosis 20.00 with written report 

Re-evaluation 5.00 

Speech and Hearing Clinic Services: 

Audiometric pure tone test $ 5.00 

Diagnostic hearing evaluation 10.00 

Hearing aid evaluation 15.00 

Hearing evaluation for medical-legal compensation claims 25.00 

Diagnostic speech evaluation 10.00 

Speech or Hearing Therapy fees per session 2.00 

Therapy fees for University students per quarter 5.00 

Examinations and Graduation: 

Revalidation Examination $ 5.00 when applicable 

Special Examination 3.00 when applicable 

Graduation fee — Bachelor and Master $ 12.00 with application for degree 

Graduation fee — Doctoral 80.00 with application for degree 

Certificate 2.50 when applicable 

National Teacher Examination 

(Education majors) 11.00 

Late application 14.00 

Thesis binding, per copy 3.75 when applicable 

Continuing Education: 

Resident Center 9.25 per quarter hour 

Resident Center — laboratory fee 6.00 per course 

Resident Center — typing fee 5.00 per course 

Extension Center 

Undergraduate course 8.00 per quarter hour 

Graduate course 9.25 per quarter hour 

Correspondence Courses 7.00 per quarter hour 

High School by correspondence 20.00 per half unit 

Registration and Records: 

American College Test 5.00 when applicable 

Change of Schedule 5.00 when applicable 

Audit Fee (Non-Credit)*** 4.50 per quarter hour 

♦This fee applies to music majors and minors as well as to other students. 

**The fees for the above conferences and workshops will be listed in the brochures 

published for each conference. The conference and workshop fees do not include the 

$9.00 per quarter hour assessment for incidental fee where university credit is desired, 

nor do they include the conference charge for room and board. 

***Audit fee for an activity course is charged at the full rate of $9.00 per quarter hour 

for the number of quarter hours applicable to the course. 



General Information 



Late Registration 10.00 full load 

5.00 partial load 
Application Fee for Foreign Students 

(Non-refundable) 10.00 with application 

Memorandum of credits .50 when applicable 

Transcript of Credits 1.00 when applicable 

ROTC deposit (Unused portion refundable upon 

proper clearance) 10.00 upon entrance 

Fall Quarter 
Science Breakage 5.00 per card 

Card is purchased in Business Office before attending first laboratory 

meeting. Any balance on card upon completion of course is refundable. 

STUDENT AID AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following information is a summary of the student aid and scholarship 
program. For further information and application forms, write to Director of 
Student Aid and Scholarships, Box 7, Southern Station, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 

APPLICATIONS. All applicants for student aid of any type must have 
been accepted for admission at the University before assistance can be granted. 
This does not preclude the submission of an application for assistance at the 
time application for admission to the University is made. Applications should 
be made before June 1st with one exception. Entering freshmen must apply 
by May 1. 

PARENTS' CONFIDENTIAL STATEMENT REQUIRED 

The University of Southern Mississippi participates in the College Scholar- 
ship Service (CSS) of the College Entrance Examination Board. Participants 
in CSS subscribe to the principle that the amount of financial aid granted a 
student should be based upon financial need. The CSS assists colleges and 
universities and other agencies in determining the student's need for finan- 
cial assistance. All students seeking financial assistance are required to submit 
a copy of the Parents' Confidential Statement (PCS) form to the College Schol- 
arship Service, designating The University of Southern Mississippi as one of 
the recipients, by April 15. The PCS form may be obtained from a secondary 
school, or the College Scholarship Service, P. O. Box 176, Princeton, New 
Jersey 08540, or P. O. Box 1025, Berkeley, California 94704. 

WORK SCHOLARSHIPS. Work scholarships vary in value with the type 
of work assigned. Students work from ten to fifteen hours per week. Awards 
are made during the month of July. 

WORK IN TOWN. Work in town is available to many students. Students 
making application are referred as requests are received from employers. 

MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS. Merit Scholarships, based on scholarly ability, 
are available in all fields of study. They range in value from $100.00 to $500.00 
for the nine months. Students who have demonstrated outstanding ability in 
any particular field of study are encouraged to apply for one of these scholar- 
ships. 

REGIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS. Regional Merit Scholarships are 
awarded to students of exceptional ability whose residence is outside the State 
of Mississippi. These scholarships are valued at $300.00 for the nine months. 

SERVICE SCHOLARSHIPS. Service Scholarships are based on skill and 
ability. These scholarships are available in Band and Music as well as in 
Athletics and range in value from $100.00 to over $500.00 for the nine months. 

LOAN PROGRAMS. Many loan programs, both short-term and long-term, 
are available to the student who desires to make use of them. The University 
administers several long-term funds such as the National Defense Student 
Loan Fund and the United Student Aid Funds Loan Program. Information 
concerning privately administered programs may be obtained by writing the 
Director of Student Aid and Scholarships. 



5* 



Scholarships 



COLLEGE WORK-STUDY PROGRAM 

Title I, Part C, of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 initiates the 
College Work-Study Program to stimulate and promote the part-time employ- 
ment of students in institutions of higher education who are from low-income 
families or are in need of the earnings from such employment to pursue 
courses of study at such institutions. Primary consideration is given to those 
students from low-income families. Additional information may be obtained by 
writing the Director of Student Aid and Scholarships. 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS 

Educational Opportunity Grants were authorized by the Higher Education 
Act of 1965. An institution may award an Educational Opportunity Grant to 
a student only if it determines that such student; (1) is a national of the United 
States for other than a temporary purpose and intends to become a permanent 
resident; (2) has been accepted for enrollment as a full-time undergraduate 
student, or is in good standing and in full-time attendance as an undergraduate 
student; (3) shows evidence of academic or creative promise and capability of 
maintaining good standing in his course of study; (4) is of exceptional finan- 
cial need; and (5) would not be financially able to attend the institution with- 
out an Educational Opportunity Grant. A student who attends school part- 
time is not eligible for a grant. A grant may not be given to any student for 
study beyond the first four years of full-time study. 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI FOUNDATION 

The University of Southern Mississippi Foundation is a Mississippi cor- 
poration whose sole purpose is to receive and manage gifts, contributions, and 
donations to the University of Southern Mississippi for educational purposes. 
It provides a centralized receptacle for receiving gifts of any nature to the 
University, handling these in a manner prescribed by the donor or in accord- 
ance with good business judgment and making the gifts work for the growth 
and development of Southern. The Foundation is managed by a Board of Di- 
rectors composed of former students and friends of the University. 

The Foundation Charter was so drawn that assistance could be given to any 
area of development at Southern so long as it is used for educational purposes. 
Some of the long-range plans include: sponsoring research, sponsoring faculty 
chairs, supplementing faculty salaries, aiding the library, providing special 
equipment, making possible achievement awards for faculty and students, pro- 
viding fellowships and scholarships, and contributing to the building of* the 
physical plant. 

During the early years of the Foundation, emphasis will be placed on se- 
curing scholarship funds. This is considered to be one of the greatest needs at 
the present time. The Foundation solicits the funds, but the awards are made 
by the University Scholarship Committee. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE FOUNDATION 

Kathy Brown — Sponsored by Pen and Sword, certain priorities. 

Clyde C. Bryan — Sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. John D. Thomas in recognition 

of the contributions of the honoree to Hattiesburg for over sixteen years. 

Designated for music major, Baptist, need, academic. 
Bush Dairy, Inc. — South Mississippi students, economic need, Business or 

Home Economics. 
Century Club — Scholarship for athletics. 
Coast Federal Savings and Loan Association, Gulfport — Gulfport area student, 

Business. 
Betty Dukes Craft — Sponsored by Forrest County Home Economics Alumnae 

and James K. Dukes, brother of Betty Dukes Craft. Outstanding student 

in Home Economics. 



53 



General Information 



Distinguished Professor Award — Presented in the name of the Distinguished 
Professor of the Year in the same discipline. 

W. R. Fairchild Construction Company — Capable and deserving students from 
Covington or Forrest County. 

Faulkner Concrete Pipe Company, Hattiesburg — Merit and need. 

First Federal Savings and Loan Association, Hattiesburg — Economics or Fi- 
nance. 

First National Bank, Hattiesburg — Best interest of the University with prefer- 
ence to surrounding area students. Economic need a factor. Ten awarded. 

First National Bank of Laurel — Awarded to a resident of Covington, Jasper, 
Jones, Perry, Smith, or Wayne County. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Y. Foote Endowment — Best interest of the University with 
economic need a factor. 

Francis O. Fox — Need and promise of success with preference to Jones County 
students. 

Bertha M. Fritzche Graduate Fellowship — Outstanding student in Home Eco- 
nomics. 

General Merit — Any student is eligible on merit basis; several given. 

Gray-Mar Farms — Funds contributed are used to match other funds to pro- 
vide scholarship loans for students. 

Bernard Reed Green — Sponsored by A. K. Mclnnis, Jr., in honor of Coach 
Reed Green. 

Lester Haddox — Worthy and promising student from Marion, Amite, Lincoln, 
Pike, or Walthall County. 

Hattiesburg Federal Savings and Loan Association — Capable and deserving 
student; given in memory of deceased directors. 

Hercules Employees — Capable and needy student. 

W. B. Harlan Memorial— Economic need, male student in Business Administra- 
tion. 

Alma Hickman — Capable and needy student. 

1956 Summer Class Heritage — Capable and needy student. 

1957 Spring Class Heritage — Capable and needy student. 

1958 Class Endowment — Capable and needy student. 

1959 Class Endowment — Capable and needy student. 

1960 Class Endowment — Capable and needy student. 

1961 Class Endowment — Capable and needy student. 

1962 Class Endowment — Capable and needy student. 
Scholarship Fund of the Sixties — Capable and needy student. 

Jones County Alumni Chapter — Capable and deserving Jones County students; 

preference given to Junior or Senior students. 
J. D. Lewis Endowment — Scholarship to be awarded on the basis of citizenship 

record, economic need, academic work, and Mississippian. 
Lamar County Alumni Chapter — Capable and needy Lamar County student. 
Marion County Alumni Chapter— Honoring Doyle M. Coats and Miss Chrys- 

telle Ford; to be presented to an outstanding Marion County student. 
Sam Miller — Capable and deserving student. 
Mississippi Association of Insurance Agents. To be awarded to a student in the 

School of Business Administration. 
Movie Star Corporation — Capable and deserving student: preference given to 

children of employees. 
Music Merit — Music majors on merit basis. 



54 



Library 



"M" Club Alumni Loan — Loans for capable and needy children of former 
letter winners at Southern. 

Marvin D. Owen Memorial Scholarship — Capable and deserving student. 

Paint Research Institute — Graduate fellowship in Chemistry. 

Pan American Tung Research and Development League — Graduate fellowships 
in Chemistry. 

Peck Oil Company — Capable and deserving Forrest County student. 

Pi Omega Pi — Outstanding student in Business Education. 

Positive Posture — Sponsored by the Mississippi Malt Beverage Company for 
two students from certain counties and cities of Mississippi. 

W. W. Stout Memorial — Creative student majoring in English. 

Trojan Powder Company — Graduate fellowships in Chemistry. 

Union Carbide Corp., Linde Division — Graduate fellowships in Chemistry. 

B. O. Van Hook Golf Scholarship — Scholarships for outstanding members of 
the golf team. 

Visco Division, Nalco Chemical Company — Economic need, Chemistry major; 
four offered. 

Paul Waldoff Memorial — Mississippian, economic need, Mathematics major. 

Winn-Dixie Stores Foundation — Junior or Senior, residence, and other re- 
quirements. 

Yellowjackets — USM — Entering freshmen, academic promise; five offered. 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

A number of students are employed by the University in secretarial and 
clerical work and as laboratory assistants, library assistants, and assistants to 
the dormitory hostesses. The purpose of this employment is primarily to asssit 
the student in earning a small part of his school expenses. Inquiries concerning 
these work assignments should be addressed to the Director of Student Aid 
and Scholarships. The University also maintains a service to assist students in 
finding part-time employment in and near Hattiesburg. Students should re- 
member, however, that their first business is to benefit by their University 
programs. Usually a student who spends several hours a day earning money 
must reduce his study load. Students should not expect to be able to earn a 
considerable part of their expenses and at the same time carry a full academic 
load. No student should plan a program that allows fewer than thirty hours 
a week for study. 

LIBRARY 

The new Joe Cook Memorial Library is a modern, two story building com- 
pletely fire -proof and air-conditioned. Of modular construction, it is arranged 
in four large divisional areas, each division containing its own current and 
bound periodicals, classified books and other materials in the subject field. 
Book stacks to accommodate 200,000 volumes and reading areas for 700 stu- 
dents are intermingled throughout the library, with the book stacks open to 
all. Special features are the study carrels, exhibit areas, a micro-reading area, 
typing room, bibliography room, and a rare book room. The Library Science 
Department is housed on the second floor of the building, as are the rooms con- 
taining Mississippiana and archives. The new library was occupied at the be- 
ginning of the Fall Quarter of 1960. 

The library is open from Monday through Friday from 7:45 A.M. to 10:00 
P.M., Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M., and Sunday 6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. 

THE SAM WOODS COLLECTION 

The Sam Woods Collection, a gift of the late Sam E. Woods, alumnus of 
the University and a former consul general of Switzerland, is comprised of 
paintings, large Flemish tapestries, antique furniture, and rare books. In the 
collection are 230 paintings, including the Holy Family by Amigoni from the 
Stennis Collection, a Murillo copy of the Holy Family from the Prado Gallery, 
and many Rembrandt and Durer etchings and woodcuts, as well as oils and 



55 



General Information 



water colors by contemporary German artists. They have been hung in the 
president's home, the library, and other main buildings throughout the campus. 
This collection of paintings is probably the largest in the state. Much of the 
furniture is of the Renaissance period. 

The very valuable collection of more than 1100 early printed and fine press 
books includes several rare Bibles which have hand-carved bindings and 
which are illustrated by Durer and other artists. The collection also includes 
several atlases of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Of special interest 
are approximately fifty beautifully illuminated pages from incunabula, as well 
as globes made before 1800 and maps of America and other countries made be- 
fore 1700. This collection is housed in the Sam Woods Room in the library. 

THE LATIN AMERICAN INSTITUTE 

The Latin American Institute, which has operated successfully under Uni- 
versity sponsorship since its founding here in 1947 by the late Colonel Melvin 
G. Nydegger, is a vital part of the University. Each quarter, the Institute 
offers a ten-week orientation course to non -English -speaking people, with 
classes in the culture and customs of the United States, and in the English 
language, including conversation, grammar, and composition. These courses 
are attended by business and professional people and students from Latin 
America and other countries who are accepted as international guests of the 
University. 

Students enrolled in The Latin American Institute receive over 300 hours 
of instruction during the ten-week period, using the latest teaching methods 
and materials including teaching machines and programmed texts, tapes, audio- 
visual aids, etc. 

Both the Michigan Language Proficiency Test and the Educational Testing 
Service's Test of English as a Foreign Language are offered through the Insti- 
tute at specified dates during the year. Any international student may take 
these examinations by applying in advance to the Institute or respectively to 
the University of Michigan or to the Educational Testing Service. There is a 
slight fee each time the examination is taken, but the students enrolled in the 
Institute may take the Michigan Language Proficiency Test free for the first 
time. 

Students interested in Inter-American affairs will find many opportuni- 
ties for profitable study at the University of Southern Mississippi, with the 
added advantage of the chance to mix with Latin American students and prac- 
tice speaking Spanish or Portugese. For further information, write to the Di- 
rector, The Latin American Institute. 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association has been in existence since 1917. During the early 
years its chief function was related to placement service. Beginning with the 
session of 1945-46, the organization experienced a rebirth. Recognizing the fact 
that a working alumni association is vital to the development of the institu- 
tion, the Executive Committee began the organization of alumni groups in the 
various counties of the state. On July 1, 1953, a full-time executive secretary 
was employed. 

The Association publishes the ALUMNI NEWS magazine four times a 
year. Active members of the Association receive all issues while four issues of 
SOUTHERN NEWS AND VIEWS are mailed to all persons on record in the 
Alumni Office. Graduates and former students are urged to become active 
members of the organization and help support the program of activities that 
is designed to assist the University in its growth and development. 



5« 



Placement Bureau 



The Alumni Association sponsored the drive to raise the funds necessary 
for the construction of the R. C. Cook University Union Building. These funds 
were secured from alumni, faculty, students, friends, and the other people of 
Forrest County and the state. 

Two meetings of the general association are held each fiscal year, the first 
at the annual homecoming in the fall and the second at the Mississippi Educa- 
tion convention in Jackson. 

At the 1954 Homecoming meeting, the association voted to observe March 30 
as University of Southern Mississippi Day. Former students of the University 
are urged to get together on this date when two or more reside in the same 
area. Organized chapters elect officers at this meeting. March 30 was selected 
from the important dates in the history of the school because it was on this 
day in 1910 that the Mississippi Legislature enacted legislation establishing the 
institution. 

The Alumni Association helped set up the University of Southern Missis- 
sippi Foundation which is the receptacle for all gifts to Southern, which gifts 
are, in turn, channeled into scholarships for the students. 



PLACEMENT BUREAU 

The function of the Placement Bureau is dual in nature. It provides as- 
sistance to graduating seniors, graduate students, and former students in ob- 
taining suitable employment, and to employers in recruiting qualified employ- 
ees. The services are provided at no cost to the student or to the employer. 

Throughout the year, current listings of employment opportunities, both 
in state and out of state, in teaching, business, industry, and government are 
made available to the students. Also, on- campus interviews are scheduled 
with personnel representatives from schools, businesses, industries, and gov- 
ernmental agencies. Students registered with the Bureau are notified of these 
interview schedules, and all who are interested are given the opportunity for 
individual interviews. 

All seniors should register with the Placement Bureau and establish a con- 
fidential placement credential folder during the last quarter of their junior 
year, or the first quarter of their senior year. These placement credentials are 
very valuable to on-campus recruiters, and to those who telephone or write 
for information about prospective employees. After graduation and/ or when 
the registrant has found suitable employment, the placement file is stored, 
and may be quite helpful in later years if a registrant wishes to change em- 
ployment or enter graduate school. 

The Director of Placement is directly responsible to the office of the Presi- 
dent of the University in the administration of the Bureau. 



57 



ACADEMIC ORGANIZATION 
AND REQUIREMENTS 

Organization Chart 

Organization for Instruction 

General Academic Regulations 

Degree Requirements 



58 



ORGANIZATION CHART 




59 



Academic Requirements 



A. ORGANIZATION FOR INSTRUCTION 

The University of Southern Mississippi for purposes of undergraduate in- 
struction is organized into the Basic College, the College of Arts and Sciences, 
The School of Business Administration, the School of Education and Psy- 
chology, the School of Fine Arts, the School of Nursing, the Division of Con- 
tinuing Education, and the Division of Home Economics. Except for the Basic 
College and the Division of Continuing Education these are all degree-granting 
colleges, schools, and divisions. 

The entering freshman is admitted into the Basic College and remains 
there until he is able to meet requirements for admission into one of the de- 
gree-granting colleges, schools, or divisions. While in the Basic College, which 
normally covers the freshman and sophomore years, the student takes courses 
required in the common core curriculum (see Basic College) or an appropriate 
pre -professional program. In addition, he may take some courses required by 
the particular college, school, or division from which he plans to graduate. He 
may also have room in his freshman and sophomore schedule to begin course 
work toward a major or minor. 

Transfer students may be admitted directly into the upper-level, degree- 
granting college, school, or division provided they transfer the particular cur- 
ricular prerequisites; otherwise, the transfer student is admitted to the Basic 
College until he can meet requirements for admission to a degree-granting 
college, school, or division. 

The University of the Southern Mississippi grants the following baccalau- 
reate degrees: 

from the College of Arts and Sciences: (Possible majors are noted 

under D below, and under 
the Bachelor of Arts each department in the Col- 

the Bachelor of Science leges, Schools, and Divisions 

Section of this catalog.) 

from the School of Business Administration: (Possible majors are noted 

under D below, and under 
the Bachelor of Science in each department in the Col- 

Business Administration leges, Schools, and Divisions 



Section of this catalog.) 



from the School of Education and Psychology: 



the Bachelor of Science "Professional" or teaching degree in 

Elementary Education 

Secondary Education (The student majors in a 

teaching area and minors in 
secondary education.) 

Special Areas 

the Bachelor of Science non- teaching degree, with majors in 

Architectural Drafting Psychology 

Corrective Therapy Recreation 

Industrial Arts Office Management 

Library Science Executive Secretarial Studies 

the Bachelor of Arts non -teaching degree, with majors in 

Library Science Psychology 

from the School of Fine Arts: 

the Bachelor of Fine Arts, with majors in 

Art Education Theatre 

Commercial Art Three Dimensional Design 

Drawing and Painting 



60 



Academic Requirements 



the Bachelor of Music, with majors in 

Church Music 

Music History and Literature 

Organ 

Piano 



String Instruments 

Theory and Composition 

Voice 

Wind Instruments 



the Bachelor of Music Education, with majors in 

General Supervision: voice or piano 
Instrumental Supervision 

the Bachelor of Arts with majors in Art or Theatre 

from the School of Nursing: 

Bachelor of Science, with major in Nursing. 

from the Division of Home Economics: (Possible majors are noted 

under D below, and under 
the Bachelor of Science each department in the Divi- 

sion of Home Economics Sec- 
tion of this catalog.) 

To be eligible for any of these baccalaureate degrees, the student must 
complete: 

1. The Basic College core curriculum 

2. Any additional curricular requirements of the particular college, school, 
or division in which he will graduate 

3. Requirements for a major or majors and a minor (if a minor is required) 

4. Any other specific requirement for the chosen degree, or the major or minor 

Specific requirements for major and minors are outlined under each de- 
partment in the Colleges, Schools, and Divisions Section of this catalog. 

Academic Programs Currently Offered 

The baccalaureate or undergraduate degree may currently be earned in 
any of the following areas of specialization. Graduate or post-baccalaureate 
degree programs are detailed in the Graduate Bulletin. 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Audiology 

Biology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Communication 

Economics 

English 

Foreign Trade 

French 

Geography 

Geology 

German 

History 

Journalism 

Language Disorders 

School of Business Administration 

Accounting 
Economics 
Finance 
General Business 



Mathematics 

Medical Technology 

Microbiology 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Public Address 

Radio -Tele vision 

Religion and Philosophy 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Speech and Hearing Sciences 

Speech Pathology 

Statistics 

Zoology 



Industrial Management 

Marketing 

Personnel Management 

Real Estate and Insurance 



6i 



Academic Requirements 



School of Education and Psychology 

Architectural Technology 
Audiology 
Business Education 
Corrective Therapy 
Elementary Education 
Executive Secretarial Studies 
General Science Education 
General Speech Education 
Health and Physical Education 

School of Fine Arts 

Applied Music 

Organ 

Piano 

String Instruments 

Voice 

Wind Instruments 
Art 
Church Music 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 
Division of Home Economics 

Child Development 
Clothing and Textiles 
Clothing Merchandising 



Food and Nutrition 
General Home Economics 



Industrial Arts 
Language Disorders 
Library Science 
Office Management 
Psychology 
Recreation 

Secondary Education 
Special Education 
Speech Pathology 



Commercial Art 
Drawing and Painting 
General Music Education 
Instrumental Music Education 
Music History and Literature 
Theatre 

Theory-Composition 
Three Dimensional Design 



Home Economics Education- 
Extension Service 

Home Economics Education- 
Teaching 

Home Economics in 
Equipment 

Institution Management- 
Commercial 

Institution Management- 
Dietetics 



Obviously, many of these majors involve the closest cooperation among 
the University's academic departments. A more detailed analysis of degree 
programs, "majors" and "minors," is found under Section D of this part of 
the catalog. 

B. GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

1. Quarter System: The University of Southern Mississippi is on the quar- 
ter system which means that in one academic year, which begins with the 
fall quarter and ends with the summer quarter, a student may earn four 
quarters of credits. A normal quarter is eleven weeks in length and a quarter 
hour (credit) represents one 50-minute class period per week (laboratory 
periods are normally 100 minutes). To transpose semester hours to quarter 
hours multiply the semester hours by one and one -half. Thus a three semester 
hour course transfers as four and one-half quarter hours. 

2. Penalties for Late Registration: Registration will continue after the close 
of the scheduled registration period (see Calendar) for six class days. Beginning 
at 8:00 A.M. on the seventh day of scheduled class work all registration will 
cease for that quarter. 

A late registration fee will be charged to all students registering after the 
scheduled registration period. The fee is ten dollars ($10.00) for a load of nine 
(9) quarter hours or more, and five dollars ($5.00) for a load of less than nine 
hours. 



Academic Requirements 



The course load for which one can register will be reduced to twelve (12) 
quarter hours beginning with the fourth day of scheduled class work. An ex- 
ception to this regulation may be made by the appropriate dean. Students 
registering for the second term of a quarter can not register for a full load 
after the second day of the new term. 

3. Change of Registration: A student who finds that he is not prepared for 
a course for which he is registered may be allowed to withdraw from the 
course on the recommendation of his adviser with the approval of the appropriate 
academic dean. A student will not be permitted to withdraw from a course 
after ten (10) class days. A fee of five dollars ($5.00) is charged for a change 
in registration after the regular scheduled registration period (see Calendar). 

4. Load of Work: The normal student load is twelve to eighteen quarter 
hours. Students on the Dean's List or President's List will be permitted to 
take twenty- one quarter hours during the next quarter of attendance. 

Seniors may take twenty quarter hours during any one of their last three 
quarters provided they made no grade lower than C during the previous 
quarter. 

Students who have maintained a place on the Dean's List or President's 
List for each of the two preceding quarters of their residence may take up 
to twenty -five (25) quarter hours of work during their next quarter of at- 
tendance with the approval of the appropriate dean. 

5. Absences: Students are expected to attend all classes each time the 
classes meet. When it is necessary that a student be absent from a class, courtesy 
requires an explanation to the instructor in charge. Some faculty members allow 
no cuts (unexcused absences from class) while others may allow as many as 
four in a four-hour course. In the event of sickness or other reasons beyond 
the control of the student, a total of thirteen (13) absences in a four-hour course, 
or the proportionate number of absences in a one, two, three, or five-hour 
course may be allowed provided all work is made up. No credit may be re- 
ceived in a course where the number of absences (regardless of the reason) 
exceeds thirteen, or the equivalent as shown above. When students are absent 
to reoresent the University, their professors are so notified by the Dean of the 
University. When students are absent because of sickness or other acceptable 
reason, their professors are so notified by the Dean of Men or the Dean of 
Women. An absence on a day immediately preceding or following an official 
holiday is considered as two absences. 

6. Examinations: Examinations will be held on the last four days of each 
quarter (see Calendar). 

During the first term of the summer quarter, the last regularly scheduled 
meeting of a class will be used for examination purposes for that term's courses. 

No final examinations are permitted prior to the scheduled examination 
period (see Calendar). 

A student who is absent from the examination without valid reason ap- 
proved by the Dean of the University forfeits credit for the quarter. Students 
will be charged a fee of $3.00 for special examinations unless excused by the 
appropriate dean. 

7. Grading System: 

A — indicates very superior work and carries 4 quality points per quarter hour. 
B — indicates excellent work and carries 3 quality points per quarter hour. 
C — indicates average work and carries 2 quality points per quarter hour. 
D — indicates inferior to average work and carries 1 quality point per quarter 
hour. 



63 



Academic Requirements 



E — indicates failure with condition. An E becomes an F if the condition is not 
removed within the next twelve months, or if the student is not in residence 
during all of the next twelve months, within the next quarter of attendance 
after the expiration of the 12 -month period. An E grade can not be raised 
higher than a D. 

F — indicates failure without condition and carries no quality points. Quality 
point averages are based on the number of hours undertaken rather than 
the number of hours passed in determining whether a student meets mini- 
mum standards. A student dropping a course after the tenth day of sched- 
uled classes will receive a grade of F. A grade of F may not be removed by 
taking a correspondence course without the approval of the dean of the 
appropriate school. 

I — indicates an incomplete record. An I becomes an F if the work is not com- 
pleted within the next twelve months, or, if the student is not in residence 
during all of the next twelve months, within the next quarter of attendance 
after the expiration of the twelve-month period. A grade of I may not be re- 
moved by taking a correspondence course without the approval of the dean 
of the appropriate school. 

G — indicates withdrawal from a course passing. No student will be allowed to 
withdraw from a course after ten scheduled class days except under unusual 
circumstances approved by the appropriate dean. 

H — indicates withdrawal from a course failing. 

Y — indicates acceleration, because of proficiency, to a more advanced course. 

P — indicates a passing grade in non- credit courses. 

Note: A faculty regulation provides that except in cases of obvious clerical 
error, a grade of A, B, C, D, or F may not be changed without permission given 
by the faculty in regular meeting. 

Computation of Grade-Point Averages: An undergraduate student will be 
permitted to repeat courses a total of six (6) times or a total of twenty -four 
(24) quarter hours in order to improve his grade-point average. (That is, he 
may repeat one four-hour course six times, three four-hour courses twice 
each, six four-hour courses once each, etc.) Other than these "repeats" all 
credit attempted will be used in computing the grade-point average. This 
policy becomes effective with courses taken after September 1, 1967. 

Dean's List: Students will be placed on the Dean's List if they have main- 
tained a quality point ratio of 3.25 or above on an academic load of fifteen 
quarter hours or more, provided they have no grade of D or below. Being on 
the Dean's List carries with it certain privileges. 

President's List: Students will be placed on the President's List if they 
have earned a quality point ratio of 4.0 (all "A's") on a load of fifteen quarter 
hours or more. Being on the President's List carries with it certain privileges. 

8. Scholarship Standards: It is necessary that students maintain a reasonable 
academic record. The following are the minimum scholastic standards for con- 
tinuance as students at the University: 

a. A student taking twelve hours or more must pass at least eight hours 
and earn at least sixteen quality points. A student taking from eight to eleven 
hours must pass at least one-half of his course load and earn as many quality 
points as hours undertaken. 

b. The first time a student does not meet the aforementioned standard, 
he will be placed on academic probation. A student already on probation will be 
suspended from the University for the next succeeding quarter if he does 
not meet the above minimum scholastic standard. However, a student suspended 
at the end of the spring quarter is suspended for the following fall quarter. 
Students thus suspended following the spring quarter may earn reinstatement 
for the fall quarter if they attend the summer quarter at the University of 
Southern Mississippi and complete at least fifteen hours with a "C" average 
or better. 



64 



Academic Requirements 



c. A student receiving all F's is subject to automatic suspension whether 
or not he has previously been on probation. On withdrawing from the Uni- 
versity, a student receiving H's on more than one-half of the hours under- 
taken is likewise subject to automatic suspension. ("H" indicates withdrawal 
from a course failing.) 

d. A student may remove himself from academic probation by: 

(1) earning at least a C average on fifteen consecutive hours and (2) achiev- 
ing an over-all C average on all work he has undertaken at the University of 
Southern Mississippi. It should be emphasized that he must achieve both (1) 
and (2). 

e. A student suspended the second time for poor scholarship may not apply 
for readmission until the expiration of at least one calendar year and presenta- 
tion of a satisfactory record of work in an accredited college or university, or 
employment, or military service. No student may be readmitted after three 
suspensions for poor scholarship. 

9. Memorandum of Credits: A memorandum of credits is a statement avail- 
able from the Office of the Registrar showing the courses completed and credits 
earned by the student as of the date of the memorandum. Memoranda are fifty 
cents each, except that upon request of the student one copy of the cumulative 
record will be supplied to the University of Southern Mississippi Placement 
Bureau without charge. 

10. Classification of Undergraduates: A student is ranked as a: 
Freshman when he has less than 40 quarter hours of earned credit 
Sophomore when he has as many as 40 hours and less than 90 hours 
Junior when he has as many as 90 hours and less than 132 hours 
Senior when he has 132 or more quarter hours of earned credit 
Special student when he is not working toward a degree. 

11. Course Numbering: Freshman courses are numbered from 100 to 199; 
sophomore courses from 200 to 299; upper division courses from 300 to 499; 
graduate courses 500 and above. Courses carrying numbers below 100 are non- 
credit courses. Undergraduate courses approved for possible graduate credit 
will carry the prefix G. Courses taken by extension will carry the prefix E; 
and by correspondence, C. Honors courses carry the prefix H. 

Freshman and sophomore students are not ordinarily permitted to register 
for upper division courses. 

12. Course Sequences and Related Sequences: Certain 100 and 200 -level 
courses may not be taken for credit by a student after he has completed higher 
level courses in the same subject area. Also, certain sequences of courses may 
not be taken for credit after a student has completed parallel courses which are 
similar in subject matter. Specific applications of this policy are indicated in 
the numbered course descriptions in the Colleges, Schools, and Division Sec- 
tion of this catalog. Selection of the courses, as well as exceptions to the 
policy, is left to the department chairmen. 

C. GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

1. Choice of Catalog: Graduation requirements must be met under a catalog 
which is not more than six years old at the time of the student's graduation 
and which carries announcements for a year during which the student earned 
some credit at the University of Southern Mississippi. A transfer student from 
a Mississippi junior college may graduate under a catalog which was in force 
during the time he attended a Mississippi junior college provided the catalog 
is not more than six years old at the time of the student's graduation. 

2. Hour Requirements: An applicant for a degree must complete 192 quarter 
hours, including core requirements and major and minor requirements. Nc 
more than six quarter hours of practical music (chorus, band, or orchestra) may 
be counted toward this total except by students who are majoring in music. 
Not more than twelve quarter hours in physical education activity courses, 



65 



Academic Requirements 



and not more than four quarter hours credit in any one varsity sport may be 
used in meeting total hour requirements for a degree. Of the total of 192 
quarter hours, 96 must be earned in a senior college. 

3. Quality Point Requirement: A student must earn a quality point ratio of 
at least 2.0 (an average grade of C) based on all courses undertaken at the 
University of Southern Mississippi. Grades in correspondence courses, extension 
courses, and off-campus workshops do not carry quality points. In the case of 
off-campus workshops this regulation became effective as of September, 1950. 

4. Hour and Quality Point Requirements for Pre-Professional Degrees: 

University of Southern Mississippi students may be allowed to complete degree 
requirements for the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degrees in pro- 
fessional schools of medicine, medical technology, dentistry, or law on the fol- 
lowing conditions: 

(a) that 140 hours of credit and 280 quality points shall have been com- 
pleted, with a minimum of three quarters and 48 quarter hours of 
residence at the University of Southern Mississippi. 

(b) that all core requirements for the degree shall have been completed. 

(c) that credit and quality points shall be transferred back to the University 
of Southern Mississippi from the school of medicine, dentistry, or law 
to complete requirements for the degree. A minimum of one year's 
work must be transferred. In the case of medical technicians, a certificate 
of graduation from a recognized school of medical technology must be 
presented. In any case a minimum of 192 quarter hours must be com- 
pleted before the degree can be awarded. 

(d) that the program leading to the degree shall be completed within two 
calendar years of the termination of the last quarter of residence at the 
University of Southern Mississippi, except that technicians will be 
allowed three calendar years after the last quarter of residence for the 
completion of the degree program. 

5. Residence Hour Requirement: Limitation on Correspondence Courses: 

To become eligible for a degree at the University of Southern Mississippi, a 
student must meet the following residence requirements: 

(a) He must earn at least 48 quarter hours of credit in residence on the 
Hattiesburg campus of the University of Southern Mississippi. 

(b) He must do the last quarter of work (sixteen quarter hours) on the 
Hattiesburg campus. Any exception to this regulation must be recom- 
mended by the dean or division chairman of the college, school, or 
division in which the student is graduating, and must be approved 
by the Dean of the University. 

(c) He must earn at the University of Southern Mississippi at least twelve 
quarter hours of credit in his major field. 

(d) Military personnel on active duty who are assigned to the University 
of Southern Mississippi on temporary duty under "Operation Bootstrap" 
may be permitted to qualify for graduation by completing a minimum 
of 40 quarter hours in residence, provided all other degree requirements 
are met. 

A long-standing regulation provides that students will not be permitted to 
do correspondence study while in residence. An exception to this rule may be 
made for seniors. This can only be done with the approval of the appropriate 
dean or division chairman and the Dean of the University. If a student takes 
a corresoondence course during his last quarter of attendance, he may not 
register for a correspondence course after he leaves the campus with the expec- 
tation of completing requirements for his degree. 

6. Basic College Core Requirements: The purpose of the Basic College 
core curriculum, is two-fold: to give all university students a common cul- 
tural experience; and to extend this shared experience over a wide enough 



66 



Academic Requirements 



range of skills and major disciplines so that the individual student may gain 
a better perspective of his own special abilities and interests. 

It is the purpose of the degree programs in the upper-level colleges, schools, 
and divisions to build upon the common core experience in guiding students 
toward majors and minors which will reflect their individual capacities and 
life aims. 

The core requirement of the Basic College, common to all degree programs, 

is itemized in the Basic College Section of this catalog. 

Two elements of the core must be emphasized here: 

Physical Education: Freshman and sophomore students are required to take 
one non- credit physical education activity course during each quarter of the 
freshman and sophomore years (i.e., one course per quarter for six quarters) 
unless excused from the requirement by the University physician or the Dean 
of the Basic College. Only one non- credit physical education activity course 
may be taken in any one quarter. 

Military Science: Physically qualified male students entering as freshmen 
are required to complete at least two years (six quarters) of Military Science. 
Male students who seek exemption from this requirement because of a physi- 
cal disability are cautioned that such exemption does not necessarily insure 
exemption from the draft under Selective Service Regulations. Students must 
accomplish this Military Science requirement each quarter in sequence, be- 
ginning with the first quarter in residence, until the requirement is completed. 

7. Exemption from Core Requirements: Students may be exempted from 
any part of the core requirements for any degree on the basis of satisfactory 
attainment as demonstrated by previous academic record. The granting of 
exemption does not involve the bestowal of credit; neither does it reduce the 
total number of hours to be earned for a degree. Its only effect is to increase 
the number of electives which the student may include in his degree program. 

8. Transfer from Basic College to Upper-Level College, School, or Division: 

Beginning with the 1962-63 academic year, all undergraduates entering the 
University below junior class status are assigned to the Basic College. In cases 
of transfer students having junior status or higher as determined by the Admis- 
sions Office, the Director of Admissions will assign the student directly to the 
appropriate college, school, or division on the understanding that deficiences 
must be made up on a schedule determined by the college, school, or divisipn 
concerned. In all other cases the student should consult the office of the dean of 
the school in which he wishes to enroll as to the appropriate time for transfer- 
ring from the Basic College. 

No student may remain in the Basic College after he has earned a 
total of 132 quarter hours of credit. If a transfer has not been made from the 
Basic College when the student earns 132 hours, he will be dropped from the 
University. Reinstatement to the University can be earned only by admission 
to a degree -granting college, school, or division. 

The student will initiate a transfer from the Basic College by filling out 
transfer application forms from the degree-granting college, school, or division 
of his major choice. If a student is refused admission to a degree -granting 
college, school, or division, he may appeal his case to the Dean of the University. 

Once a student is admitted to a degree-granting college, school, or division, 
he should report to the chairman of his major department for academic advise- 
ment. The department chairman is responsible for all advisement in his depart- 
ment, but he may designate a member of his department faculty to advise any 
particular student. The student must carry his copy of the approved transfer 
application, and the adviser will have the departmental copy. In the advisement 
process, the work plans section of the transfer application should be completed 
on both the departmental copy and the student copy. This will constitute the 
student's degree program; and he should be expected to follow it thereafter 



67 



Academic Requirements 



unless changes are agreed to later by the student and the adviser. Any such 
changes should be entered on both the departmental copy and the student's 
copy of the degree program. 

When the student is ready to file the degree application — which should be 
done three quarters before degree requirements are completed, (see paragraph 
number 15 below) — the material in the transfer application will supply most of 
the information needed to complete the degree application. The degree applica- 
tion must be signed by the department chairman. 

9. Change of College, School, or Division: Students wishing to transfer from 
one college, school, or division of the University to another must make applica- 
tion to and be approved by the dean or division chairman of the college, school, 
or division into which they wish to transfer. 

10. College, School, and Division Degree Requirements: In addition to the 
Basic College common core requirement, each degree-granting college, school, 
or division may have its own requirements for a particular degree. These 
requirements are designed to give the student the necessary preparation for 
completing a major in the particular college, school, or division. The additional 
upper-level requirements currently in force are itemized in the Colleges, 
Schools, and Divisions Section. 

11. Courses Numbered 300 and Above: To become eligible for any bac- 
calaureate degree, a student is required to complete a minimum of sixty-eight 
(68) quarter hours in courses numbered 300 or above. 

12. English Proficiency: To become eligible for any baccalaureate degree, a 
student must pass a qualifying examination in English proficiency after be- 
coming a junior. The examination is given on Thursday of the seventh week of 
each quarter; and it is to the student's advantage to take the examination 
during the first quarter of attendance after he becomes a junior. 

13. Quality Point Requirement for the Major and Minor: A student must 
have a quality point average of at least 2.0 (a C) in the major field and in 
the minor field on courses taken at the University of Southern Mississippi. 

A transfer student's work done in the major and minor fields in another 
institution must average at least 2.0 to be applicable toward the major and 
minor requirements at the University of Southern Mississippi. If the transferred 
work does not average at least a C, the student must remove any deficiencies 
in that part of the major and minor credit being transferred. Transferred 
deficiencies may be removed by: (a) repeating at the University of Southern 
Mississippi a sufficient number of courses on which grades of D were trans- 
ferred and thereby raisin? the grades in those courses to the level required 
for a C average, or (b) striking from the transferred transcript courses in the 
major or minor field with grades of D, and taking additional courses in the 
major or minor at the upper division level to meet the University's degree 
requirement. 

14. Change of Major within a College, School, or Division: Any student 
wishing to change his major within a college, school, or division must secure the 
approval of the dean or division chairman. 

15. Application for Degree: A student is expected to file an application for 
a degree at least three quarters before degree requirements are completed. This 
application filed with the Registrar will show the work completed by the student 
and the courses planned for the ensuing quarters. Filing three quarters in 
advance of the proposed graduation date will allow time for checking the 
application, and also allow the student time for making up any deficiencies 
found in the degree program. After the application has been approved by the 
Registrar's Office, it becomes the student's official degree program. 

No application for degree will be accepted until the degree fee of twelve 
dollars ($12.00) has been paid at the Business Office. 



68 



Academic Requirements 



16. Approval of Faculty: The names of all applicants for degrees are sub- 
mitted to a vote of the faculty. If this vote is favorable, the President of the 
University is authorized by the Board of Trustees to grant the degree. 

17. Degrees with Honors: Students with exceptional academic records may 
be awarded degrees with honors or with highest honors. The residence require- 
ment for such degrees is not less than five quarters on the Hattiesburg campus 
with a load of not less than twelve quarter hours in each quarter, and totaling 
not less than eighty (80) quarter hours. In computing this residence require- 
ment, one six-week term will be counted as a half quarter when the load is six 
hours or more. A degree with honors will be granted to a student who main- 
tains a quality-point average of 3.5 or more. A degree with highest honors will 
be granted to a student who maintains a quality-point average of 3.8 or more. 

18. Second Baccalaureate Degree: The University of Southern Mississippi 
will grant a candidate a second baccalaureate degree based upon requirements 
of an applicable catalog, provided the program for the second degree includes at 
least 48 quarter hours with at least 96 quality points. The 48 quarter hours 
must be related to a specific major separate from the first degree major; and 
the 48 hours must be completed after the first degree requirements are met. 



D. SPECIFIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS DETERMINED 
BY CHOICE OF SPECIALIZATION 

In the baccalaureate degree's combination of breadth with depth, the major 
and minor fields are the concentrated areas of study in which the student 
achieves some depth of scholarship or specialization to complement the core 
requirement's breadth. 

Following this general pattern of designating a "major" from an area of 
special interest, the student normally will choose his degree program and major 
as follows: 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
A student seeking the Bachelor of Science degree in the College of Arts 
and Sciences will select a major from among the following fields: 

Audiology Medical Technology 

Biology Microbiology 

Botany Philosophy 

Chemistry Physics 

Communication Political Science 

English (45 hours required) Public Address 

Foreign Trade Radio -Television 

French Religion and Philosophy 

Geography Spanish 

Geology Speech and Hearing Sciences 

German Speech Pathology 

History Sociology 

Journalism Statistics 

Language Disorders Zoology 
Mathematics 

The student seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and 
Sciences will select a major from any of the foregoing fields, or from Economics 
or Foreign Trade. For the difference between B.A. and B.S. core requirements, 
see the Colleges, Schools, and Divisions Section. 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
The student seeking the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 

degree in the School of Business Administration will select a major from among 
the following fields: 



69 



Academic Requirements 



Accounting Marketing 

Economics Industrial Management 

Finance Personnel Management 

General Business Real Estate and Insurance 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

The School of Education and Psychology degree programs are a bit more 
complex than those of other colleges and schools, since the teacher- education 
curricula embrace "professional," or methods, as well as "subject," or content, 
courses. 

The School of Education and Psychology awards the Bachelor of Arts degree 
(normally a non-teaching degree) with majors in: 

Library Science or 

Psychology 

The School of Education and Psychology also awards two types of Bachelor 
of Science degree: teaching and non-teaching. 

B.S. (non- teaching) 

The Bachelor of Science non-teaching degree in the School of Education 
and Psychology may be secured with a major in any one of the following fields: 

Architectural Technology Library Science 

Corrective Therapy Office Management 

Executive Secretarial Studies Psychology 

Industrial Arts Recreation 

B.S. (teaching) 

The Bachelor of Science professional teaching degree is awarded only in 
the School of Education and Psychology. This B.S. teaching degree falls into 
one of three general categories: Elementary Education, Secondary Education, 
or Special Areas Education. Certification requirements for public school 
teachers make necessary certain hour totals and course content for the majors 
and minors in each of these categories. 

For example, the student preparing to teach in elementary schools, grades 
one through eight, will major in Elementary Education for his B.S. teaching 
degree. No academic minor is required. 

The B.S. teaching degree in Secondary Education, grades seven through 
twelve, requires a minor in professional education courses, with a major selected 
from one of the following fields (required hours are indicated where the total 
requirement is more than 36) . 

Biology 

Business Education (40-48 hours) 

Chemistry 

Economics* 

English (45 hours) 

French 

General Science (See Science Education Section of this Bulletin.) 

General Speech 

Geography* 

German 

History* 

Home Economics (52 hours)** Political Science* 

Industrial Arts (44 hours) Sociology* 

Mathematics Spanish 

Physics 
♦Students majoring in economics, geography, history, political science, or sociology and 
minoring in secondary education must include in their degree programs the following 
courses: world history — 8 quarter hours; American history — 8 quarter hours; Mississippi 
history — 4 quarter hours; economics — 4 quarter hours; political science — 4 quarter hours; 
geography— 4 quarter hours. 

**Home Economics majors will enroll in the Division of Home Economics, but will 
also apply to the School of Education and Psychology for approval of their secondary 
education teaching program. 



7° 



Academic Requirements 



The Special Areas in which teacher-education programs are available, 
grades one through twelve, are: 

School of Fine Arts 

Art Education 
Music Education 

School of Education and Psychology 

Audiology*** 

Health and Physical Education (22 hours Health, 22 hours Physical 

Education) 
Language Disorders*** Special Education 

Library Science Speech Pathology*** 

***Curricula for the Audiology, Language Disorders, and Speech Pathology majors 
will be found in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Any student preparing to become a Special Areas teacher in one of these 
major fields will enroll in the School of Education and Psychology, and will then be as- 
signed to the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences for courses in the major. The 
teaching degree will be awarded by the School of Education and Psychology. 

Public school teachers may also be certified in the special areas of music 
education or art education (see under School of Fine Arts above). The certifica- 
tion requirement for art education is a 44-hour major in art, with a minor in 
professional education, 

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 
The student seeking the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in the School of Fine 
Arts will select his major from: Art Education, Commercial Art, Drawing and 
Painting, Theatre, and Three Dimensional Design. 

The student seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree will select as his major 
either Art or Theatre. 

The student seeking the Bachelor of Music degree will select his major from 
among the following: 

Church Music String Instruments 

Music History and Literature Theory and Composition 

Organ Voice 

Piano Wind Instruments 

The student seeking the Bachelor of Music Education degree will select his 
major from either: 

General Supervision: voice or piano emphasis, or 
Instrumental Supervision 

THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 
The Bachelor of Science degree will be in Nursing. 

DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 

The student seeking the Bachelor of Science degree in the Division of Home 
Economics will select a major from among the following areas of specialization: 

Child Development Home Economics Education- 
Clothing and Textiles Teaching 

Clothing Merchandising Home Economics in Equipment 

Food and Nutrition Institution Management- 
General Home Economics Commercial 

Home Economics Education- Institution Management- 
Extension Dietetics 



Academic Requirements 



MINOR: 

In addition to the major, each student, where the degree program so requires, 
must also choose a minor (or else a second major). He should select his minor in 
consultation with his academic adviser. A minimum of twenty-eight (28) quarter 
hours is needed for the minor, with the quality point requirement as noted in 
paragraph C-13 above. 

With certain exceptions, any of the areas of specialization or majors indi- 
cated above may be selected for the minor. In choosing a minor, however, the 
student should be guided by the following policies: 

A. A student working for a non -teaching degree must establish a minor 
(28 hours) chosen from among the fields listed above as possible majors with two 
exceptions: 

(1) A student may establish a minor for the non-teaching degree in general 
science by offering 36 hours from two or more appropriate fields (biology, 
chemistry, geology, mathematics, and physics), provided he offers at 
least 12 hours from each field he chooses to include. 

(2) To establish a minor in any field, a student must earn at least twelve 
(12) hours above the core requirements in that field. 

B. A student working for a teaching degree in secondary education neces- 
sarily establishes a minor in secondary education. 

Since many high schools in Mississippi require teachers to teach in more 
than one field, it is recommended that students working for secondary education 
certification plan their electives so as to meet certification requirements in some 
subject field in addition to their major. 



7* 



COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, 
AND DIVISIONS 

The Basic College 

The College of Arts and Sciences 

School of Business Administration 

School of Education and Psychology 

School of Fine Arts 

The School of Nursing 

Division of Continuing Education 

Division of Home Economics 



73 



The Basic College 



THE BASIC COLLEGE 

SIDNEY E. L. WEATHERFORD, JR., DEAN 

Counselors: Dorothy Hille, Charles B. McNeill, M. Selby Parker 
All entering freshmen and all transfer students with less than ninety (90) 
quarter hours of college credit are assigned to the Basic College and remain 
there until they are able to meet requirements for admission into one of the 
degree -granting colleges, schools, or divisions of the University. The Basic 
College, therefore, serves as the primary advisement and administrative unit 
for freshmen, sophomores, and other undergraduate students who have not 
been admitted into a degree-granting college, school, or division. 

Three academic programs are provided for Basic College students: (1) a 
general education program consisting of a core curriculum for students who 
seek baccalaureate degrees; (2) pre- professional curricula for students who 
plan to transfer to professional schools for specialized degrees; (3) a two-year 
terminal program in secretarial training for students who do not wish to pur- 
sue baccalaureate degrees. The quarterly schedules and course requirements of 
students during their enrollment in the Basic College are determined by their 
chosen programs from those listed above. 

The General Education Program 
The general education core is outlined below and should be used as a 
guide for Basic College students who have not selected majors. The student 
should note that certain choices exist within the core. The choices depend upon 
the requirements of the college, school, or division of the student's proposed 
major. 

In addition to the core, with appropriate options, the various colleges, 
schools, and divisions will have other course requirements or recommendations 
for their prospective students during their freshman and sophomore years. 
Immediately following the outline of the general education core, students will 
find a special outline of the core along with other freshman and sophomore 
requirements for the various colleges, schools, and divisions of the University. 
Please note that the student without a major or interest area should follow the 
general core until a major is selected. The student with a major or interest 
area should follow the Basic College program outlined below for the college, 
school, or division of his major or the Basic College program outlined for his 
major in other appropriate sections of the Bulletin. 

The General Core Curriculum 

The purpose of the core curriculum is two -fold: to give all university 
students a common cultural experience and to extend this experience over a 
wide range of skills and major disciplines so that the individual student may 
gain a better perspective of his own special abilities and interests. Courses in- 
cluded in the core follow: 

Hours 

.English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202* or 433 20 

history 101, 102 8 

Science (Students interested in a science major must take laboratory 
science. Those preparing to teach must take eight (8) hours of 
biological science and eight (8) hours of physical science which 

may be in Fundamentals of Science) 12-16 

Mathematics 4 

'Political Science 101 4 

Social Science-Elect one course from two of the following fields for 

eight hours:* 8 

Economics 200 or 251 
Geography 103 
Psychology 201 
Sociology 103 or 201 



74 



The Basic College 



Other Courses — Elect one course from three of the following fields for 

twelve hours:* 12 

Fine Arts (Music 165, Art 120', or Theatre 103) 
Philosophy 101 or 210 
Public Address 101 
Health 179 

Physical Education** (6 quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science (for men) 6 

Total for Women 68 or 72 

Total for Men 74or 78 

Please note that in addition to the Basic College core curriculum outlined 
above, a degree-granting college, school, or division will have additional re- 
quirements for admission into that college, school, or division. These additional 
requirements are described below and in the introduction to each college, 
school, or division in the Bulletin. 

*For recommendations and requirements in these areas, the student should consult the 
appropriate section below and the introduction to the appropriate degree-granting col- 
lege, school, or division which he plans to enter. 

**For required courses in this area, students should consult the section of the Bulletin 
pertaining to Physical Education. Students participating in Varsity Athletics, Marching 
Band, Dixie Darlings, or Pom Pon Girls may substitute this for non-credit Physical 
Education during one quarter each year of participation. 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Hours 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 306* 24 

History 101, 102 8 

Science (may be Fundamentals of Science) 12 

Mathematics (any four hour course) 4 

Social Sciences*— Political Science 101, Economics 200 or 251, 

Geography 103, Psychology 201, Sociology 103 or 201 20 

Philosophy 101 • 4 

Other courses — Elect one course from two of the following fields for 

eight hours 8 

Music 165 

Art 120 

Public Address 101 or 111 

Physical Education— (6 quarters) (Non-credit) 

Foreign Language** 24 

Military Science (for men) 6 

Total for Women 104 

Total for Men HO 

*Represents core and/or college, school, or division requirements. 

** Students who have two years of the same language in high school and who make 
satisfactory placement test scores may meet the language requirement by completing the 
second-year sequence of courses in the same language for a total of twelve quarter hours. 

Bachelor of Science Degree Hours 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202 or 433 20 

History 101, 102 jj 

Mathematics* • ^ 

Science* (non-science majors may take Fundamentals of Science) ... 16 

Political Science 101 • • • • • • ■ 4 

Social Science — Elect one course from three of the following fields for 

twelve hours* 12 

Economics 200 or 251 

Geography 103 

Psychology 201 

Sociology 103 or 201 



75 



The Basic College 



Philosophy 101 or 210* 4 

Other courses — Elect one course from two of the following fields for 

eight hours* 8 

Music 165 or Art 120 
Public Address 101 
Health 179 

Physical Education— (6 quarters) (Non- credit) 

Military Science (for men) 6 

Total for Women 84 

Total for Men 90 

*Represents core/or college, school, or division requirements. 

School of Business Administration 
Freshman Year Hours 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

History 101, 102 8 

Political Science 101 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101* 4 

Mathematics 112 or 102 4 

Science** 12 

Business Education 101*** 4 

Military Science (for men) 3 

Physical Education (3 quarters) (Non-credit) 

* Mathematics 100 or 101 is required only for those students who feel they have an in- 
adequate background of algebra from high school. Other students may go directly into 
Mathematics 112 or 102. Industrial Management majors must choose MAT 101 and 102. 
**General Physics or Chemistry is strongly recommended for Industrial Management 
majors. 

***A student may not take Business Education 101 if he has had a year of high school 
typewriting and may be excused from the course if he demonstrates proficiency. 

Sophomore Year Hours 

Public Address 101 4 

Fine Arts (Music 165, Art 120, or Theatre 103) 4 

English 201, 202 8 

Philosophy 101 or 210 and Psychology 201 or Sociology 103* 8 

Economics 251, 252* 8 

Accounting 201, 202, 203* 12 

Finance 300 or CSS 200* 4 

Military Science (for men) 3 

Physical Education — (3 quarters) (Non-credit) 

*Core requirements and/or requirements of the School of Business Administration. 

School of Education and Psychology 

Elementary Education 

Students preparing for elementary teaching must satisfy a definite program 
of requirements. Due to the comprehensive nature of the Elementary Educa- 
tion sequence, the following courses satisfy Basic College core curriculum and 
school requirements at the freshman and sophomore level. 

Hours 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202 or 433 20 

History 101, 102 8 

Science 16 

♦Physical Science— FS 104 and 105—8 hours 
♦Biological Science— FS 106 and 107—8 hours 

Mathematics 100 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Social Science — Elect two different courses from the following for 

eight hours 8 



76 



The Basic College 



Economics 200 or 251 

Geography 103 

Sociology 103 or 201 

Physical Education— (6 quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science (for men) 6 

Other courses — the following courses are required: 16 

Public Address 101 

Health 179 

Psychology 201 

Music 165 or Art 120 
*The student may elect laboratory science, but must complete eight hours of Biological 
Science and eight hours of Physical Science. 

Secondary Education 

Students preparing to teach at the secondary school level should complete 
the following core and school requirements during their freshman and sopho- 
more years: 

Hours 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202 or 433 20 

History 101, 102 8 

Science (non-science majors) 16 

Biological Science — 8 hours 
Physical Science — 8 hours 

Science majors must take laboratory sciences and should see 

requirements for majors in the sciences. Non-science majors 

may take Fundamentals of Science. 

Mathematics (any four hour course) 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Social Science — Elect two courses from the following for 8 hours 8 

Economics 200 or 251 

Sociology 103 or 201 

Geography 103 
Other Courses — The following courses are required 16 

Health 179 

Public Address 101 

Psychology 201 

Music 165 or Art 120 

Physical Education — (6 quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science (for men) 6 

Non -Teaching Degrees 

The School of Education and Psychology offers major programs in Psy- 
chology, Library Science, Office Management, Executive Secretarial Studies, 
Recreation, and Industrial Arts leading to the non-teaching Bachelor of Science 
Degree. The Bachelor of Arts Degree is offered in Psychology, Library Sci- 
ence, and Architectural Drafting. The requirements for these non-teaching 
degrees for freshmen and sophomores are listed below: 

Bachelor of Science (non- teaching) Hours 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202 or 433 20 

History 101, 102 : 8 

Science* 12 

Mathematics 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Social Science — Elect two courses from the following for 8 hours 8 

Economics 200 or 251 

Sociology 103 or 201 

Geography 103 



77 



The Basic College 



Other courses in the Basic College 12 or 20 

Philosophy 101 or 210** 

Fine Arts (Music 165, Art 120, or Theatre 103) 

Public Address 101 

Psychology 201 

Psychology 202** 

Physical Education — (6 quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science (for men) 6 

*Biology or physics recommended for psychology majors. 
**Required for psychology majors only. 

Bachelor of Arts (non-teaching) 

Same as Bachelor of Science non-teaching degree with the addition of 
twelve (12) to eighteen (18) hours of a foreign language. 

School of Fine Arts 
Inasmuch as the requirements of the School of Fine Arts will differ for 
the various majors, and the sequence in which students take their course work 
is fixed for each year, no attempt is made to show the combined core and 
school requirements here. Students interested in being admitted to the School 
of Fine Arts should follow the detailed outline for the freshman and sophomore 
years found in the Fine Arts section of the Bulletin. 

School of Nursing 
In 1966 the Legislature of the State of Mississippi authorized the University 
of Southern Mississippi to create a School of Nursing. The requirements for 
admission to the new school are now being finalized. Freshmen who plan to 
enter the School of Nursing should complete the courses shown below. Sopho- 
mores and upper classmen should consult their advisers or the Dean of the 
School of Nursing for appropriate courses. 
Freshman Year Hours 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103* 15 

Biology 101, 102, 103* 12 

Mathematics 101 4 

Fine Arts 4 

Public Address 101 4 

Military Science (for men) 3 

Physical Education — (3 quarters) (Non-credit) 

Total for Women 51 

Total for Men 54 

* Represents core and/or school requirements. 

Division of Home Economics 
The core curriculum for Bachelor of Science degree as outlined below is to 
be followed by the student who pursues any major in the Division of Home 
Economics. 

Hours 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202 or 433 .20 20 

History 101, 102 8 8 

Mathematics (Home Economics majors who take Chemistry must 

take Mathematics 101) 4 4 

Science* 12 16 

Majors in Institution Management, Clothing and Textiles, 
Home Economics Education, Food and Nutrition must take: 
Chemistry 121, 122, 123, and Biology 101. 

Majors in Child Development, Clothing Merchandising, 
Equipment, and General Home Economics must take: Biology 
101, 339, and a four-hour course in a laboratory science or 
Biology 101, 102, and 339. 



78 



The Basic College 



Social Science* lg ^6 

Political Science 101 
Economics 200 
Sociology 103 
Psychology 201 

Other Courses* 12 12 

Health 179 

Public Address 101 

Art 111 instead of Art 120 

Home Economics* 18 18 

Home Economics Education 122** 

Food and Nutrition 137 or 178 (For Institution 
Management — Commercial) 

Food and Nutrition 285 or 262 (For Institution 
Management— Commercial ) 

Clothing and Textiles 126 

Not required for Institution Management- 
Commercial Majors 

Child Development 139** 

Military Science (for men) 6 6 

Physical Education— (6 quarters) ' . (Non-credit) 

Total 96or 100 

Note: Majors in Institution Management-Commercial will have only 90 or 94 hours. 
♦Represents core and/or division requirements. 

**Not required of transfer students or students majoring in Institution Management- 
Commercial. 

Pre-Professional Curricula 

In addition to its own degree programs, the University of Southern Missis- 
sippi provides pre-professional training for students who plan later to enter the 
fields of medicine, dentistry, medical technology, pharmacy, optometry, law, 
and engineering. Recommended pre-professional curricula are outlined below. 
Pre-professional programs may also be arranged with individual students 
through their academic advisers in such fields as architecture, forestry, social 
work, veterinary medicine, or the ministry. 

RECOMMENDED PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL PROGRAM 

Advisers: Dudley, Bedenbaugh, Cliburn, Franks, Harrises, Newsom, B. C. Smith 
The pre -medical and pre- dental curriculum is offered to meet the needs of 
the student wishing to enter an approved school of medicine or dentistry. The 
student should seek the counsel of his advisers in selecting courses that will 
meet the specific requirements of the medical or dental school which he in- 
tends to enter. This is especially true of science, social science, and language 
requirements. 

It should be remembered that the keen competition for admission to med- 
ical and dental schools makes it imperative that the student plan his curricu- 
lum carefully and maintain a superior scholastic standing. A three-year pre- 
medical and pre -dental program is outlined below, but if the student wishes 
to receive a bachelor's degree before transferring to professional school, a 
four-year curriculum may be worked out with the advisers. A student entering 
medical or dental school after the junior year may be awarded a bachelor's 
degree by the University of Southern Mississippi upon completion of the first 
year of medical or dental school if the core curriculum requirements outlined 
elsewhere in this catalog are met, and provided that the 52 hours credit he 
receives for his first year of medical school complete the 192 hours require- 
ment for a degree. 



79 



The Basic College 



Freshman Year Hours 

Biology 101, 102, 103 12 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 15 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

Mathematics 101, 102, 103 12 

Physical Education (3 Quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 3 

Sophomore Year 

Biology 401 4 

Chemistry 304, 305 8 

English 201, 202 or 332 8 

History 101, 102 8 

Mathematics 171 4 

Physics 101, 102, 103 15 

Physical Education (3 Quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 3 

Junior Year* 

Chemistry 301, 302, 303 15 

Biology 301, 302 8 

Economics 200 or 251 4 

Music 165 or Art 120 4 

Philosophy 210 or 101 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Psychology 201 4 

Public Address 101 4 

Sociology 103 4 

*Any student desiring to receive the Bachelor of Arts degree instead of continuing in 
the Pre -medical-Pre -dental Program should replace 12 hours of the junior year pro- 
gram with 12 hours of a foreign language. (German 101, 102, 103 recommended.) 

Senior Year 

Foreign Language 12 

Electives in 300 or 400 courses 24 

Courses replaced by foreign language during junior year 12 

RECOMMENDED PROGRAM IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Advisers: Dudley, Bedenbaugh, Cliburn, Franks, 
Harrises, Newsom, B. C. Smith 
The following three-year program is planned to meet the needs of those 
specializing in medical technology. The student who completes an additional 
year at a recognized school of medical technology may be eligible for a Bach- 
elor of Science degree at the University of Southern Mississippi upon the 
transfer of 52 hours credit allowed for the year's training. 

Freshman Year Hours 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 15 

Biology 101, 102, 103 12 

Mathematics 101, 102, 103 12 

Physical Education (3 Quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 3 

Sophomore Year 

Biology 228, 229, 339, 340 12 

Chemistry 304, 305 8 

English 201, 202 or 332 8 

Political Science 101 4 

Public Address 101 4 

History 101, 102 8 



8o 



The Basic College 



Physical Education (3 quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 3 

Junior Year 

Biology 305, 468, 469, 471 16 

Sociology 103 4 

Chemistry 251 4 

Economics 200 4 

Philosophy 210 or 101 4 

Music 165 or Art 120 4 

Psychology 201 4 

RECOMMENDED PRE-PHARMACY PROGRAM 

Advisers: Dudley, Bedenbaugh, Cliburn, Franks, 

Harrises, Newsom, B. C. Smith 

The requirement for admission to most schools of pharmacy is two years 

of pre-pharmacy training. The student should obtain a copy of the catalog of 

the school of pharmacy which he plans to attend and with his academic adviser 

adjust his course of study to meet his individual needs. 

First Pre-pharmacy Year Hours 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 15 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

Mathematics (Algebra and Trigonometry) 101, 102, 103 12 

Biology 101, 102, 103 12 

Electives 4 

Physical Education (3 quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 3 

Second Pre-pharmacy Year 

Chemistry 301, 302, 303 15 

Physics 101, 102, 103 15 

Economics 251, 252 8 

Botany 104, 214 8 

Electives* 12 

Physical Education (3 quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 3 

♦Electives should be selected from one or more of the following fields of study: English 
literature, foreign languages, history, mathematics, philosophy, political science, psy- 
chology, sociology, speech. 

RECOMMENDED PRE-OPTOMETRY PROGRAM 

Advisers: Dudley, Bedenbaugh, Cliburn, Franks, 
Harrises, Newsom, B. C. Smith 
Most schools of optometry require at least two years of pre -optometry 
courses as a prerequisite. 

First Pre- optometry Year Hours 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

Mathematics 101, 102, 103 12 

Biology 101, 102, 103 12 

History 101, 102 8 

Sociology 103 4 

Philosophy 210 4 

Physical Education (3 Quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 3 



8i 



The Basic College 



Second Pre-optometry Year Hours 

Physics 101, 102, 103 15 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 15 

Psychology 201 4 

Public Address 101 4 

English 201, 332 8 

Political Science 4 

Economics 200 4 

Music 165 or Art 120 4 

Physical Education (3 Quarters) (Non-credit) 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 3 

RECOMMENDED PRE-LAW PROGRAM 

Adviser: Dr. Wilber 

The requirements for admission to accredited law schools vary. Some 
schools require only three years of pre-law study, but many require comple- 
tion of degree programs. The pre-law student should obtain a catalog of the 
law school where he intends to study, and use it in planning his program. Law 
schools expect the pre-law student to emphasize content subjects rather than 
skill subjects. All schools require that their students be able to express them- 
selves well in written composition, so a student who is weak in composition 
should take extra courses. 

The program at the University of Southern Mississippi is divided into two 
parts, and the pre-law student should select one. 

A. The student may earn a regular baccalaureate degree from the Uni- 

versity of Southern Mississippi. 

B. The student may earn a degree from the College of Arts and Sciences 

by completing three years of pre-law study and transferring back a 
year of work from the law school after it is completed. Under this 
program the following requirements must be met: 

1) A minimum of 140 hours with 280 quality points in pre-law courses 
must have been completed, with at least four quarters of residence 
at the University of Southern Mississippi. 

2) All core requirements must have been met for the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

3) At least one year of law school work must be transferred back, 
the marks for which must average "C" or better. The combined 
total of hours at the University of Southern Mississippi and those 
transferred back from law school must equal 192 or more. The 
work from the law school must be transferred back within two 
years of leaving the University of Southern Mississippi. 

The student's attention is invited to the following courses that might be 
especially helpful in preparing for law school: 
Accounting; 201, 202, 203. 
Finance 310, 311. 
History 411, 469, and 470. 
Political Science 307, 412, 434, and 485. 
Public Address 101 

The student should notice that most law schools now require an applicant 
for admission to have taken satisfactorily the Law School Admission Test. 
Some schools want this to be taken nine months before entering law school. 
The pre-law adviser can inform a student of the dates and places where this 
test is given, but the student must arrange for taking it well in advance. 



8x 



The Basic College 



RECOMMENDED PRE-ENGINEERING PROGRAM 

Advisers: Munn, St. Clair 

The following curricula are set up to meet the requirements for admission 
to most engineering schools. The student should note that in each of the pre- 
engineering programs, there are several electives allowed. A catalog from the 
selected engineering school should be consulted before the elective courses are 
chosen. Courses that are acceptable at many engineering schools are English 
201 and 202; Economics 200 and 251; Public Address 101; Philosophy 300, 303, 
and 401; Sociology 103; and Psychology 201. 

FRESHMAN YEAR PROGRAM FOR ALL ENGINEERS 



Fall Qtr. Hrs. 

Math 171 4 

English 101 4 

Chemistry 101 5 

Ind. Arts 121 3 

ROTC 1 

PE 



Winter Qtr. Hrs. 

Math 276 4 

Chemistry 102 5 

English 102 4 

Ind. Arts 122 3 

ROTC 1 

PE 



Spring Qtr. Hrs. 

Math 277 4 

Chemistry 103 5 

English 103 4 

Pol. Sci. 101 4 

ROTC 1 

PE 



17 



17 



18 



Fall Qtr. 

Elective 4 

Math 377 4 

Physics 201 5 

Ind. Arts 325 4 

ROTC 1 

PE 



CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM— SECOND YEAR 
Hrs. Winter Qtr. Hrs. Spring Qtr. 

Math 378 4 

Physics 202 5 

History 101 4 

Elective 4 

ROTC 1 

PE 



18 



18 



Hrs. 

Math 405 4 

Physics 203 5 

Geology 101 4 

History 102 4 

ROTC 1 

PE 

18 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM— SECOND YEAR 



Fal Qtr. Hrs. 

History 101 4 

Math 377 4 

Physics 201 5 

Chemistry 304 4 

ROTC 1 

PE 

18 



Winter Qtr. Hrs. 

Math 378 4 

Physics 202 5 

Chemistry 305 4 

History 102 4 

ROTC 1 

PE 

18 



Spring Qtr. Hrs. 

Math 405 4 

Physics 203 5 

Elective 4 

Ind. Arts 325 4 

ROTC 1 

PE 

IB 



ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM- 
SECOND YEAR 



Fall Qtr. Hrs. 

Elective 4 

Math 377 4 

Phvsics 201 5 

Ind. Arts 136 4 

ROTC 1 

PE 

18 



Winter Qtr. Hrs. 

Math 378 4 

Physics 202 5 

History 101 4 

Elective 4 

ROTC 1 

PE 

18 



Spring Qtr. Hrs. 

Math 405 4 

Physics 203 5 

History 102 4 

Ind. Arts 325 4 

ROTC 1 

PE 

18 



83 



The Basic College 



Secretarial Training 

The two year program in secretarial studies is a terminal program for stu- 
dents who do not wish to pursue a baccalaureate degree but wish to prepare 
for secretarial employment. The program leads to a specialized certificate in 
Secretarial Training. Required courses are shown below: 

Hours 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

Public Address 101 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101 4 

Physical Education— (6 quarters) (Non-credit) 

Social Studies — Elect one course from the following for four hours 4 

Political Science 101, History 101, History 102, Sociology 103, 
Geography 143, or Psychology 201 

Business Education 101, 102, and 310* 12 

Business Education 201, 202, 305, 371, and 372* 20 

Business Education 300 4 

Business Education 352 2 

Business Education 354 2 

Business Education 385 4 

Business Education 450 4 

Business Education 460 4 

Accounting 201 and 202 8 

Economics 251 4 

Finance 310 4 

Elective 4 

Total 96 

*A student who has had one year of typewriting in high school will start his program 
with BED 102, and a year of shorthand in high school, with BED 202. The hours saved 
are to be used on the following courses: FIN 100, ECO 252, ACC 203, MKT 300, FIN 375, 
SED 334, or the Social Studies courses listed in the general education requirements. 

Academic Advisement 

The Dean of the Basic College assigns all Basic College students to faculty 
advisers who work with students during fall orientation, provide assistance 
in schedule planning each quarter, and provide general academic information 
as requested by students. Adviser assignments are made on the bases of an- 
ticipated majors or interest areas with special advisers for students who have 
not selected majors. Regular faculty members with interests and abilities in 
working with students are chosen to serve in this capacity. Students, in turn, 
are encouraged to consult their advisers as needed and are required to consult 
them at least one time each quarter for schedule planning. The quarterly 
schedule of a Basic College student must be approved in writing by his assigned 
adviser before he is permitted to register for that quarter. 

Academic Policies 

Inasmuch as the emphasis in the Basic College is on required courses, the 
following policies will be followed in implementing the Basic College program: 

1. Scheduling. For the fall quarter only, some classes are assigned to enter- 
ing freshmen. These classes might include English, History, Political Science, 
Military Science, and Physical Education, but will always be appropriate for 
the major indicated by the student on the application for admission to the 
University. Such fall quarter assignments cannot be changed without adequate 
justification. The fall quarter freshman, with the assistance of his assigned 
adviser, will complete his fall quarter schedule around the assigned classes. 
For subsequent quarters, however, the freshman student will plan his entire 
schedule in consultation with his adviser. 



s 4 



The Basic College 



Please note that the above procedure applies to entering freshmen for fall 
quarter only. Basic College students of other classifications and of other dates 
of entry must plan their entire schedules in consultation with assigned ad- 
visers. All Basic College students will be expected to schedule classes on the 
basis of availability. Students will be expected to include late afternoon and 
evening classes in their schedules as deemed necessary by the University. 

2. Schedule Changes. Upon completion of regular registration and payment 
of fees, Basic College students will not be permitted to change their schedules 
without adequate justification. Part-time employment arranged after registra- 
tion, early failing grades, and fear of failure are not adequate reasons for 
changing schedules. With the exception of class conflicts and unusual illnesses, 
there is little justification for schedule changes at the Basic College level. 

3. Military Science. All physically qualified male students of the Basic Col- 
lege who have not had prior military service are required to complete six 
quarters of military science. Each full-time, male student, regardless of his 
academic program, must complete at least one military science course each 
quarter until the six quarters are completed. Medical exemptions are deter- 
mined by the university physician and the Dean of the Basic College upon 
recommendation of the student's family physician. Other exemptions as well 
as a description of the required courses are discussed in the section of the 
Bulletin pertaining to the Department of Military Science. 

4. Physical Education. Freshman and sophomore students are required to 
take one appropriate non- credit physical education course each quarter of the' 
freshman and sophomore years for a total of six quarters. The required 
courses are discussed in the section of the Bulletin pertaining to the Depart- 
ment of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. Medical exemptions are 
determined by the university physician and the Dean of the Basic College 
upon recommendation of the student's family physician. Students participating 
in Varsity Athletics, the Marching Band, the Dixie Darlings and the Pom 
Pons may substitute this for non-credit physical education during one quarter 
each year of participation. 



% 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Claude E. Fike, Dean 
Charles R. Brent, Assistant Dean 

PURPOSE 

It is the purpose of the College of Arts and Sciences to provide a broad 
cultural and educational experience, specialized disciplines in major and minor 
fields, and pre -professional programs. Consult the Graduate Bulletin for post- 
baccalaureate programs. 

A student wishing to enter the College of Arts and Sciences must complete 
the core requirements in the Basic College with an over- all C average, and then 
make application for transfer to the College of Arts and Sciences. He will then be 
assigned to the departmental chairman of his major field for academic advise- 
ment. The student should note the specific B.A. or B.S. degree requirements of 
the College of Arts and Sciences as given below in order to complete as many of 
the required courses as possible in the Basic College prior to transfer. The courses 
below must be taken either in the Basic College or after transfer to the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

For the Bachelor of Arts Degree: 

English 202 and 306 

12* or 24 hours of foreign language (must be in the same language) 

4 hours from each of the following five fields of study: 

(Total: 20 hrs.) Preferably, these courses should be 

Economics 200 or 251 taken in the Basic College, but may be 

Geography 103 completed after the student is ad- 

Philosophy 101 mitted to the College of Arts and 

Psychology 201 Sciences. 

Sociology 103 or 201 

8 hours from two of the following three fields of study: 
Music 165 
Art 120 
Public Address 101 or 111 

12 hours of science: either the Fundamentals of Science, or in a laboratory 
science. This is not an additional school requirement but indicates a 
choice 

*Pertains to students who have completed at least two years of a foreign language in 
high school, whose placement test results indicate that they are adequately prepared to 
begin the second year of the same language, and who complete the second year of this 
same language. 

For the Bachelor of Science Degree 

English 202 or 433 or 332 

12 hours of foreign language (must be in the same language) may be re- 
quired at the option of the major department. 

8 hours of mathematics (total required: 12 hours, including 4 in the Basic 
College core) 

Science majors: 12 hours of laboratory science for a minimum total of 24 
hours. 

Non- science majors: 4 hours (in addition to 12 required in the Basic 
College) either in the Fundamentals of Science sequence or in a 
laboratory science. Students should check the description of the 
Fundamentals of Science to avoid duplication if laboratory science is 
selected. 

Philosophy 101 or 210 



86 



Biology 



4 hours from three of the following four fields of study: 

(Total: 12 hrs.) Preferably, these courses should be 

Geography 103 taken in the Basic College, but may 

Economics be completed after the student is ad- 

Psychology 201 mitted to the College of Arts and 

Sociology 103 or 201 Sciences. 

ORGANIZATION 

The College of Arts and Sciences is organized into seventeen departments: 
Biology, Chemistry, Communication, Computer Science and Statistics, Eco- 
nomics (for Bachelor of Arts degree), English and Literature, Foreign Lan- 
guages, Geography and Geology, History, Mathematics, Military Science, 
Physics and Astronomy, Political Science, Religion and Philosophy, Science 
Education, Sociology, and Speech and Hearing Sciences. The Department of 
Computer Science and Statistics offers a major in statistics but only a minor 
in computer science. The Department of Military Science has no academic 
major or minor. Other departments offer both majors and minors. The College 
shares with the School of Education and Psychology joint responsibility for the 
Department of Science Education, embracing a sequence of courses titled Fun- 
damentals of Science. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Stanley Parry, Director 

The College of Arts and Sciences administers a University-wide Honors 
Program for the top fifteen students in each class, selected on the basis of 
previous academic records, recommendations, ACT scores, and personal inter- 
views. The program is supervised by the Honors Council. Special classes are 
offered by separate disciplines for this program and an inter-disciplinary 
seminar is given each quarter under the supervision of the director. 

Honors Colloquium 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 203, 301, 302, 303, 401, 402, 403. 
One hour each. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY (BIO) 

J. F. Walker, Chairman 
Abbott, Cliburn, Crozier, Dale, Fish, Gunter, Harrises, Jones, 
Reynolds, B. Smith, Stocks, Yarborough 
The Department endeavors to prepare students to become research biolo- 
gists, marine biologists, biology teachers, and workers for state game-fish 
commissions and national parks. The Department also offers courses in biology 
to meet all requirements of pre -professional training in the specialized fields 
of medicine, dentistry, medical technology, pharmacy, veterinary science, ento- 
mology, and marine biology. 

Requirements for Major 

A student majoring in Biology may elect one of several alternative plans. 
He may elect either the B.A. program, the B.S. Professional (for teachers), 
B.S. Non-professional, M.S. in teaching of biology, M.S. in combined sciences, 
and the Ph.D. For the Master's and Ph.D. degrees consult the Graduate 
Bulletin. A student's choice of a degree program should be determined in 
consultation with his adviser and in keeping with the type of profession or 
vocation which he plans to enter. Majors in any field of Biology who take 301, 
339, 421, or 468 must take the second course in sequence with each; that is, 
respectively 302, 340, 422, and 469. 
A. Curriculum — College Core 

In meeting core curricula requirements for any of the undergraduate 
degrees listed above, the student majoring in Biology should elect a full year 
of chemistry and a full year of physics in lieu of the minimum core require- 
ments for the physical sciences. 



87 



College of Arts and Sciences 



B. Curriculum for biology teachers in the secondary schools who major in 
Biology and are candidates for the B.S. professional degree are allowed to take 
only 44 quarter hours for their major selected from the following three groups 
of courses as indicated by their advisers: 

1. Biology 101, 102, 103, and 104—16 hours 

2. Biology 301, 302, 438, and 439-- 16 hours 

3. Biology 401, 339 or 400, and 360 or 452—12 hours 

C. Curriculum for the B.S. or B.A. Non-Teaching Degree 

1. General Requirements: 

All majors in Biology, except those taking the B.S. teaching degree, must 
take a minimum of 48 hours in the Department of Biology. Twenty-four of 
the 48 must be in courses numbered 300 or above. All majors are required 
to take Biology 101, 102, 103 or 104, and Biology 401. In addition to the 
foregoing, those who major in Biology and Marine Biology must take Biology 
301 and 302, those who major in Botany must take Biology 411 and 412, those 
who major in Microbiology must take Biology 339 and 340, and those who 
major in Biology must take Biology 400, 301 and 302 or Biology 438 and 439 
in lieu of Biology 301 and 302. 

2. Requirements for Specialized Programs: 

The pre-professional requirements for the specialized fields of medicine 
and medical technology are listed on preceding pages in the Basic College Sec- 
tion of this catalog. 

The specialized programs in Botany, Zoology, and Microbiology are as 
follows: 

Botany 

A minimum of 48 hours that will include Biology 101, 102, 103, 104, 401, 
411, 412, 417, 438, and 439 plus an additional four hours in advanced botany 
selected with the approval of the major professor. 

Zoology 

A minimum of 48 hours selected with consent of the major professor 
from the following: Biology 101, 102, 103, 301, 302, 400, 401, 418, 419, 421, 422, 
424, 452 (or 353), 481, 482, and 484. Biology 301-302 and 401 are required. 

.Microbiology 

A minimum of 48 hours which must include Biology 101, 102, 103 or 104, 
339, 340, 400, and 401, plus an additional twenty hours of courses in bac- 
teriology or other approved courses in the area of microbiology, selected in 
conference with the major professor from courses listed in the following 
pages of courses in Biology. Microbiology majors must have organic chemistry. 
Detailed outlines of specialized programs with majors in Biology are 
as follows: 

Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 

and 

MINOR IN BOTANY 

(For freshman and sophomore years, see Basic College core curricula) 

Junior Year 

Fall Hrs. Winter Hrs. Spring Hrs. 

Biology 305 or 421 ... 4 Biology 422 or 424 ... 4 Biology 401 4 

Biology 438 4 Biology 439 4 Biology 417 4 

Biology 400 4 Electives 8 Biology 410 4 

Electives 4 Electives 4 

16 16 16 



88 



Biology 



Fall Hrs. 

Biology 339 4 

Biology 425 or 481 ... 4 
Electives 8 

16 



Senior Year 
Winter Hrs. 

Biology 340 4 

Biology 482 4 

Electives 8 

16 



Spring Hrs. 

Biology 412 4 

Biology 423 4 

Electives 8 



16 



Curriculum Leading to 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

BIOLOGY MAJOR 

CHEMISTRY, GEOLOGY, OR PHYSICS MINOR 

(For freshman and sophomore years, see Basic College core curricula) 



Junior Year 

Fall Hrs. Winter Hrs. 

Biology 4 Biology 4 

Chem., Geol., or Chem., Geol., 

Physics 5 or Physics 5 

Biology 339 4 Psychology 4 Electives 

Elective 4 Elective 4 



Spring Hrs. 

Biology 401 4 

Chem., Geol., 

or Physics 5 

8 



17 17 

Summer — 6 weeks at Gulf Coast Research Laboratory — 
Biology 431 or 454—9 hrs. 



Fall Hrs. 

Chem., Geol., or 

Physics 5 

Philosophy 101 4 

Electives 8 

17 



Senior Year 
Winter Hrs. 

Chem., Geol., 

or Physics 5 

Philosophy 301 4 

Electives 8 

17 



Spring 

Chem., Geol., 

or Physics 

Electives . . . 



17 



Hrs. 

.. 5 
..12 



17 



PRE-BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY 

Freshman Year 

102, 103 



Biology 101 
General Biology- 
12 quarter hours 
Biology 104 

Intro, to Botany, 
4 quarter hours 
General Inorganic Chemistry 101, 
102, 103 

15 quarter hours 



English 101, 102, 103 
(12 quarter hours) 
History 101, 102 

(Core requirements, 
8 quarter hours) 
Physical Education 

(3 quarters) 
Military Science (3 quarters 
required for men) 



Sophomore Year 



Psychology 201 

(Core requirement, 4 quarter hours) 
Chemistry 301, 302, 303 

(15 quarter hours) 
Health 179 

4 quarter hours 
Military Science (3 quarters 

required for men) 



Biology 301- 302 (comparative 

Anatomy, 8 quarter hours) 
English (Literature) 201, 202 

(Core requirements, 8 quarter 

hours) 
Math 101, 102, 103 (12 quarter hours) 

(two quarters of algebra, one of 

trigonometry) 
Physical Education (3 quarters) 



s 9 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Junior Year 

Biology 400 (Protozoology) Physics 101, 102, 103 (15 quarter 

(4 quarter hours) hours) 

Biology 401 (Genetics, 4 quarter Social Studies (8 quarter hours) 

hours) (Core requirements may be selected 

Foreign Language (12 quarter hours) from any of the following depart- 

Electives (4 quarter hours) ments: Sociology, Economics, Gov- 

Biology 419 — Field Zoology ernment, or Geography) 

Senior Year 

Biology 481, 482 (Ecology, 8 quarter Public Address 101 

hours) (Core, 4 quarter hours) 

Electives (20 quarter hours) Biology 484 (Limnology, 4 hours) 

(Second year French, German, etc., Chemistry 304, 305 
highly recommended) (8 quarter hours) 

In addition to the core requirements, certification requirements, and the 
departmental requirements, the student must complete requirements for a 
minor in a related field. Courses not used to fulfill any of these requirements 
are free electives and may be taken in any department of the University. The 
minor field courses should be selected after consultation with the major 
professor. 

The requirements for the M.S. in the teaching of biology are listed in the 
Graduate Bulletin. Students may also take the M.S. in biology with a minor in 
geology, physics, chemistry, health, or psychology. Each student before register- 
ing for any graduate work must first of all confer with his major professor and 
obtain approval of his entire graduate program. 

GULF COAST RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The University of Southern Mississippi is closely allied with the Gulf 
Coast Research Laboratory at Ocean Springs. Staff members and biology majors 
in both the graduate and undergraduate schools have been active participants 
in the work at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory. It is strongly recommended 
that all graduate majors in biology take at least a six -weeks program in 
marine biology as offered at the Laboratory. The following undergraduate 
courses are to be had only at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory: Biology 
454-G454, 431-G431, 429-G429. 

GENERAL COURSES (BIO) 
BIOLOGY 

101 — Biology I. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

A study of fundamental biological principles common to all life. Structure 
and function at molecular, cellular, and organic levels, with examples from both 
plant and animal kingdoms. 

102— Biology II. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two 2 -hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: Biology 101. 

A continuation of biological principles and an introduction to taxonomic 
principles with a survey of the plant and animal kingdoms. 

103 — Biology HI. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102. 

A comparative discussion of vertebrate systems; growth and development; 
basic principles of genetics; ecological systems. 

485 -G485— History of Biology. Four hours. 

For seniors and graduate students only. 

Lectures and readings concerning the development and organization of the 
biological sciences; the development of biological principles and theories wijl 
be emphasized. 



9° 



Biology 

ZOOLOGY 

301^Comparative Anatomy I. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, and 103. Majors who take Biology 301 must 
also take Biology 302. 

302 — Comparative Anatomy II. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two 2 -hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: BIO 301. 

A continuation of Biology 301; laboratory work devoted to study of the 
turtle and cat. 

305 — Microtechnique. Four hours. 

One hour lecture and six hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, and 103. Open to juniors and seniors, and 
others by special permission. 

Techniques for preparing whole mounts and tissue slides. 

360 — Field Zoology: Herpetology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Identification, preservation, and collection of all local species of amphibians, 
and reptiles. Discussions of southeastern United States zoogeography, and 
faunal problems. Field trips when possible. 

400-G400 — Protozoology. Four hours. 

Two theory periods, and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, and 103. 

Studies are made of parasitic and free-living protozoa concerning their 
anatomy and life histories. Vital stains and permanent mounts are utilized; 
students prepare some permanent mounts. 

401-G401 — Genetics. Four hours. 
Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, and 103. 
The fundamental principles of heredity. 

414-G414 — Cellular Physiology I. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and one 4-hour laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: 12 hours of biology, 12 hours inorganic chemistry and either 
8 hours of organic chemistry or 8 hours of analytical chemistry, plus 8 hours 
of mathematics. 

A functional study of the inorganic, organic, and physical aspects of living 
organisms with emphasis on the cell. 

415-G415— Cellular Physiology II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 414-G414. 

A continuation of Biology 414-G414. 

421-G421— Embryology I. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, 103, 301, and 301. Majors who take Biology 421 
must also take Biology 422. 

Embryology of vertebrates, especially the frog. Maturation, fertilization, 
cleavage, origin and development of germ layers, histogenesis, and organo- 
genesis. Strongly recommended for majors. 

422-G422— Embryology II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 421. 



9 1 



College of Arts and Sciences 



A continuation of Embryology 421. The embryological development of ver- 
tebrates, especially the chicken and the pig. Histogenesis and organogenesis of 
the chicken, the pig, and man. 

424-G424— Histology. Four hours. 

Three lecture periods and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, and 103. 

Microscopic anatomy for general students. Recommended for hospital tech- 
nicians, nurses, and biology majors. 

427-G427 — Biogeography. Two hours. 

Two lectures per week. 

A descriptive and analytical study of the distribution of plants and animals. 

433-G433— Medical Entomology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: 12 quarter hours of zoology. 

The study of the various species of arthropods of medical importance. 

435-G435 — Mammalogy. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory and field work per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 301, 302 recommended. 

Morphology, taxonomy, life history, distribution, evolution, and adaptations 
of mammals. 

437-G437— Ornithology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory and field work per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 301, 302 recommended. 

Morphology, taxonomy, life history, distribution, evolution, and adaptations 
of birds. 

448-G448 — Comparative Animal Physiology I. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: 16 hours of biology, 12 hours of chemistry, and 8 hours of 
mathematics. 

A study of the physiological activities of different kinds of animals by 
comparing physiological and biochemical systems. Topics will be selected for 
detailed consideration in lectures with outside reading and class discussion. 

449-G449 — Comparative Animal Physiology II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 448-G448. 

A continuation of Biology 448-G448. 

450-G450 — Principles of Nomenclature. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, 103, and BIO 360 or BIO 466. 

452-G452— Entomology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, and 103. 

A study of the principal groups of insects. Life habits, structural adapta- 
tions, life histories, natural habitats, classifications and the economic impor- 
tance of certain species. 

463-G463— Arthropodology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory and field work per week. 
Prerequisite: BIO 433-G433. 

The study of terrestrial and fresh water arthropods other than insects, 
including their collection, preservation, and identification. 

468-G468— Parasitology I. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 



Biology 



Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, 103. Majors who take Biology 468 must also 
take Biology 469. 

The epidemiology, morphology, and importance of animal parasites, with 
emphasis on those affecting man. 

469-G469— Parasitology II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 468 or G468 or consent of instructor. 

A continuation of BIO 468. 

481-G481— Ecology I. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory or field work per week. 

Prerequisites: 24 hours of biology including a course in botany, 12 hours of 
chemistry, college algebra. 

Interrelations between organisms and their environment. Biogeochemical 
cycles and nutrient distribution. Limiting factors, productivity and energy 
transfer in food chains. Ecological succession. 

482-G482— Ecology II. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory or field work per week. 

Prerequisite: BIO 481. 

Ecological effects of temperatures, light, rainfall, salinity. Relationship of 
respiration and osmoregulation to environmental factors. Population growth 
form. 

483-G483— Ecology III. Four hours. 

One hour lecture and a minimum of six hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 482 and senior standing, except by special permission. 

Special field and laboratory problems in beginning ecological research 
under direction. 

484-G484 — Limnology. Four hours. 

Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. 

Prerequisites: BIO 102, 481, and 482 strongly recommended, junior stand- 
ing, and permission. 

A study of the physical, chemical, and biological conditions in lakes, ponds, 
and streams. 

492— Biological Problems I, II, III. Two hours each. 

Given only by special arrangement. 

A course in special techniques, designed for majors with a need for certain 
basic biological techniques as tools for future research. 

COURSES SPECIALLY RECOMMENDED FOR MARINE BIOLOGY MAJORS 

See listing of courses given at Gulf Coast Research Laboratory. 

418-G418 — Field Zoology: Macroscopic Invertebrates. Four hours. 

One hour lecture and six hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, 103. 

Collection, preservation, identification, and general biology of local, macro- 
scopic, marine, fresh-water and terrestrial invertebrates. Field work as needed. 

419-G419 — Field Zoology: Microscopic Invertebrates. Four hours. 

One hour lecture and six hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, 103. 

Collection, preservation, identification, and general biology of local, macro- 
scopic, marine, fresh-water and terrestrial invertebrates. 

466-G466— Ichthyology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, 103. 



93 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Collection, preservation and identification of local species of fishes and fish- 
like vertebrates, with primary emphasis on fresh water forms. Field work when 
possible. 

479-G479 — Introduction to Biological Oceanography. 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 481 or G481 and 482 or G482. 

Introductory study of fundamentals of oceanography to acquaint the stu- 
dent with major ocean basins and their characteristic topography. Physical and 
chemical characteristics of sea water will be examined from biological view- 
point. The course is intended as prerequisite for Biology 515. Restricted to 
seniors and graduate students. 

BOTANY 

104 — General Botany. Four hours. 

Anatomy, physiology, and reproduction of major plant groups and their 
taxonomy. 

345— Dendrology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: BIO 104. 

The identification, taxonomic and ecological characteristics, and the dis- 
tribution of trees. 

409-G409 — Introductory Phycology. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 104 or General Bacteriology. 

Consideration of the algae, nature, position, classification, and importance. 
Laboratory devoted to general procedures of cultivation, identification, and 
morphology. 

410-G410 — Introductory Morphology of Plants. Four hours. 

Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: Advanced standing in botany. 

Laboratory devoted to study of extant and fossil vascular plants. 

411-G411— Plant Ecology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Advanced standing in botany. 

Relationship of plants to their environment. 

412-G412— Plant Physiology I. Four hours. 

Two theory and two laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: General botany (Botany 104 or its equivalent). General chem- 
istry and organic chemistry recommended. 

Studies of basic physiological processes of green plants: greenhouse labora- 
tory work. 

413-G413— Plant Physiology II. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 104, 412. General chemistry and organic chemistry rec- 
ommended. 

Studies of basic physiological processes of green plants: greenhouse labora- 
tory work. 

417 -G417— Taxonomy of Higher Plants. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 104. 

A study of classification of both wild and cultivated seed plants. 

423 -G423— Plant Anatomy. Four hours. 

A study of the anatomy of recent and fossil plants. 

425-G425 — Introductory Mycology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: Bacteriology 339 and 340 or consent of instructor. 

A study of the general classification of yeast and molds, their physiology 
and biochemical activities. 



94 



Biology 

438-G43&— Botany I. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 
A study of gross and microscopic structures, physiology, life cycles, and 
economic significance of the Thallophytes. 

439-G439— Botany II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 438 

A study of the Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

339 — General Bacteriology I. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, 103 or 104. Organic chemistry recommended. 
Majors who take Biology 339 must also take Biology 340. 

Introduction to basic principles of bacteriology. 

340 — General Bacteriology II. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: General Bacteriology I, one year of inorganic chemistry. 
Organic chemistry recommended. 

A continuation of BIO 339. 

403-G403— Food Bacteriology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and two 2 -hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 339, 340, organic chemistry, or consent of instructor. 

Microorganisms important in food: preservation and spoilage of food: food 
in relationship to diseases. 

405-G405 — Public Health Bacteriology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 339 and 340. 

Schemes for isolation and identification of major groups. 

406-G406— Virology. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 339 and 340 and organic chemistry. 

A study of representative bacterial plant and animal viruses with major 
emphasis on bacteriophages. 

420-G420— Soil Bacteriology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and two 2 -hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 339, 340, organic chemistry, or consent of insrtuctor. 

Study of soil microflora, emphasis or Nitrogen- Carbon cycle in environ- 
ment. 

441-G441 — Water and Sewage. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and two 2 -hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 339, 340, organic chemistry, or consent of instructor. 

Control of purity water supply: sources and types of pollution, and control 
of sewage disposal. 

444-G444 — Bacteriology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: BIO 339, 340 and organic chemistry. 

Special emphasis on advanced techniques in bacteriology. 

471-G471— Immunology and Serology. Four hours. 

Two lectures and two 2 -hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: Advanced standing in microbiology. 



95 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Studies of infection, resistance, types of immunity, hypersensitivity, and 
major techniques of diagnostic immunological reactions. 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

228 — Human Anatomy. Four hours. 

Three lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, and 103. 

Introductory course in human anatomy. Carries no credit for biology majors. 
229 — Physiology. Four hours. 

Three lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, 103, 228, (majors may substitute Biology 301 
and 302 for Biology 228). General chemistry recommended. 

Principles of human physiology. This course carries major credit. 

MARINE BIOLOGY 

THE FOLLOWING COURSES ARE TAUGHT AT THE GULF COAST 

RESEARCH LABORATORY IN OCEAN SPRINGS BY THE GULF 

COAST RESEARCH LABORATORY STAFF 

429-G429— Marine Botany. Four and one-half hours. 

Prerequisites: General botany, plant taxonomy, and Biology 339. 

A survey, based upon local examples, of the principal groups of marine 
algae, treating their structure, reproduction, distribution and general biology; 
including a survey of the common maritime flowering plants, their identifica- 
tion and ecology. 

431-G431— Marine Vertebrate Zoology. Nine hours. 

Prerequisites: 12 hours in biology, including comparative anatomy. 

A formal lecture and laboratory survey of all marine chordates, including 
the lower subphyla, the fishes, reptiles, mammals, and shore birds. 

454-G454 — Marine Invertebrate Zoology. Nine hours. 

A study of the structure, natural habitats, classification and economic im- 
portance of invertebrate species native to the waters of the Mississippi Sound 
and around the outlying islands. 

488 — Marine Zoology for Teachers. Six hours. 

Prerequisites: 12 quarter hours of biology. No credit toward a major or 
minor in biology. 

Designed for teachers of biological science in elementary and secondary 
schools to become acquainted with marine life in the Gulf of Mexico. Trips to 
shrimping grounds, oyster reefs, and sea food processing plants will be made. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY (CHE) 

C. E. Lane, Jr., Chairman 
C. Brent, Coe, Bedenbaugh, Hurst, Long, Newsom, Thames, Wertz 

A student planning to major in Chemistry may elect either the B.S. or the 
B.A. degree. For information concerning the Master's degree and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree, see the Graduate Bulletin. A major in Chemistry will in- 
clude not less than 48 quarter hours of Chemistry. 

The Department of Chemistry is accredited by the Division of Chemical 
Education of the American Chemical Society. A chemistry major may now 
graduate as a chemist certified by the American Chemical Society. In order to 
obtain this certified degree the following curriculum is prescribed. 



9 6 



______ Chemistry 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102, 103 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 

Mathematics 101, 102, 103 

History 101, 102 

Political Science 101 

Physical Education (Non-credit) 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 or 433 

Chemistry 301, 302, 303 

Mathematics 171, 276, 277 

Physics 201, 202, 203 

Soc. Sci 4 hrs. 

Physical Education (Non-credit) 

Junior Year 

Chemistry 304, 305, 405 
Chemistry 401, 402, 403 
Mathematics 377, 378, 405 
German 121, 122, 123 

Senior Year 

Chemistry 431, 432 or 406, 496 or 425 Philosophy 210 
German 221, 222 Art 120 or Music 165 

Soc. Sci. 8 hrs. Public Address 179 

Elective — 8 hours advanced science 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

A major in Chemistry for secondary education will include not less than 36 
hours and must consist of: 
Chemistry 101, 102, 103 
Chemistry 301, 302, 303 
Chemistry 304, 305 
Other courses may not be substituted. 

CHEMISTRY COURSES (CHE) 

In the sequence of courses the immediate lower number is prerequisite for 
the following course. Example: Chemistry 101 is prerequisite to 102 and 102 
to 103. 

101, 102, 103 — General Chemistry. Five hours each. 

Four theory periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: Algebra, or MAT 101 and 102 taken concurrently with 
Chemistry 101 and 102. 

A course in general inorganic chemistry stressing fundamental principles 
and a comparative study of the elements. Emphasis upon fundamental laws, 
theories, and application. 

121, 122, 123— General Chemistry. Four hours each. 

Three theory periods and one double laboratory period per week. 

A course in general inorganic chemistry stressing a general understanding 
of chemistry and the chemical industry. This sequence is not to be taken by 
chemistry majors and will not be accepted in that program, except when this 
series is transferred from another college or university and is approved by the 
chairman of the department. 



97 



College of Arts and Sciences 



251 — Organic Chemistry. Four hours. 

Three theory periods and one double laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: CHE 103 or 123. 

A short course in organic chemistry designed for students majoring in 
home economics. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; the applications of 
organic chemistry to the home. 

252— Food Chemistry. Four hours. 

Three theory periods and one double laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: CHE 251. 

A brief course in the composition and properties of foods; proteins, carbo- 
hydrates, fats, and salts. 

253 — Physiological Chemistry. Four hours. 

Three theory and one double laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: CHE 252. 

301, 302, 303— Organic Chemistry. Five hours each. 

Three theory and two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: CHE 103 or 123. 

A course intended to give the student a knowledge of the fundamental 
principles of the compounds of carbon. Reactions of organic compounds, their 
derivatives, their nomenclature, classification, relationships and general appli- 
cations. Required of chemistry majors. 

304, 305 — Analytical Chemistry. Four hours each. 

One theory period and three double laboratory periods per week. One hour 
recitation. 

Prerequisite: CHE 103 or 123, preferably 103, concurrently with 401 and 
402. 

A course intended to give a knowledge of chemical equilibrium and the 
theories of quantitative analysis and a study of the techniques necessary in 
making gravimetric and volumetric determinations with an introduction to 
instrumental analysis. 

370 — Pre -Medical Quantitative Analysis. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and six hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: CHE 206. 

Not to be taken by chemistry majors. 

371, 372— Physical Chemistry for Pre-Medical and Biological Sciences Stu- 
dents. Four hours each. 

Three theory periods and one double laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisites: MAT 103, CHE 305 or 370. 

Those topics of physical chemistry of immediate application to the prob- 
lems of pre-medical and biological work form the basis of this course, the gas 
laws, kinetics, equilibrium and free energy, electro-chemistry, pH, buffers, 
surface phenomena, colloids, and membrane phenomena. 

Not to be taken by chemistry majors. 

401-G401, 402-G402, 403 -G403— Physical Chemistry. Four hours each. 

Three hours theory and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisites: MAT 276 and CHE 206. 

A mathematical treatment of the laws governing chemical and physical 
changes. A study of the fundamental principles of chemistry and physics in 
their relation to each other. 

404 — Chemical Literature. One hour. 

One lecture per week. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



98 



Communication 



The selection and use of the reference materials of chemistry; periodicals, 
journals, texts, patents, and other sources of information. 

405-G405 — Instrumental Analysis. Five hours. 

Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory or library per week. 

Prerequisites: CHE 206, 305, 402. 

A course in the theory and use of analytical instruments such as colori- 
meters, polarimeters, ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectrophotometers, gas 
chromatographs, etc. 

406-G406 — Qualitative Organic Analysis. Five hours. 
Two hours lecture and eight hours laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite: CHE 206. 

Emphasis on the systematic identification of pure organic chemicals and 
the analysis of mixtures. 

425-G425 — Survey of Biochemistry. Five hours. 

Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: CHE 206. 

431, 432 — Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours each. 

Three hours lecture and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: CHE 403. 

Theoretical aspects of valency, stereo chemistry, oxidation potentials, acid- 
base theories, nonaqueous solvents, coordination compounds, and nuclear chem- 
istry. 

474-G474 — History of Chemistry. Four hours. 

Four hours theory per week. 

Prerequisite: Senior College standing. 

496 — Special Projects I. 1 to 4 hours. 

Prerequisites: Calculus, CHE 206, 403, 405. 

Available to chemistry majors during their last two quarters of residence, 
upon recommendation of the faculty of the Department of Chemistry. A course 
in library and laboratory research on a problem chosen in consultation with 
the adviser. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION 

Ben A. Chappell, Chairman 
Buckley, Cromwell, Ellis, Everett, George, Horton, Tucker, Waite, Willis 

The Department offers majors in the following areas of study: Communica- 
tion, Public Address, Journalism, Radio-Television, and General Speech Educa- 
tion. All majors and minors are urged to contact the Department Chairman, or 
appropriate subdivision director, for assistance in planning their degree pro- 
grams. Any changes must have the written consent of the Department Chair- 
man. 

All majors are required to participate in at least one of the three activities 
within the Department: debate, radio, or journalism. 

Majors and minors are responsible for fulfilling the Basic College core and 
College of Arts and Sciences requirements in addition to the specific require- 
ments listed in the appropriate sections below. 

Majors in Public Address, Radio-Television, or Journalism may elect to 
minor in one of the other two divisions. Speech Education and Communication 
majors must minor outside the Department. 



99 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Communication 

Students majoring in Communication are required to complete 48 hours. 
Majors should follow the prescribed program listed below. 

Students desiring a minor in Communication should work out a program 
in conjunction with the Department and their major field adviser. A suggested 
program would include: PA 200, 430, 447; JOU 421, 422, 423; RTV 121, 422, 445. 

Major requirements: 

PA 200, 341, 430, 447 16 

JOU 311, 421, 422, 423 16 

RTV 422, 445 8 

Departmental electives 8 

Minor requirements: 

An academic minor can be selected with the Department's approval from 
one of the following areas: marketing, general business, computer science, 
psychology, English, social sciences, history, sociology, geography, political sci- 
ence. Students desiring other minor programs may so petition to the Depart- 
ment Chairman. 

Public Relations Minor 

Students outside the Department may secure a minor in Public Relations 
with the following recommended program: 
PA 200, 350, 430, 447 
JOU 421, 422, 423 
RTV 422, 445 



PUBLIC ADDRESS 

Students majoring in Public Address are required to complete 40 hours. 
Required courses include: PA 101, 230, 341, and 361. Other courses are to be 
selected with the approval of the Director of Public Address. Course programs 
will be tailored to individual needs or to specified vocational preparation. 

Students minoring in Public Address are required to complete 28 hours, of 
which PA 101, 230, and 341 are required. All minor programs are to be selected 
with the approval of the Director of Public Address. 

Public Address majors may elect minor programs in any area approved by 
the University. Recommended minors include: psychology, marketing, manage- 
ment, political science, history, sociology, journalism, radio-television, com- 
puter science and statistics. 

PUBLIC ADDRESS COURSES (PA) 

101 — Oral Communication. Four hours. 

Fundamentals of speaking and listening. Emphasis on research, organiza- 
tion, and presentation of ideas. 

Ill — Argumentation and Debate. Four hours. 

Analysis of the principles of argumentation with emphasis on the prepara- 
tion of cases on national problems, issue development, and refutation. Will 
satisfy core requirements. 

200 — Survey of Mass Communication. Four hours. 

Introduction to public address, radio- television, and journalism as commu- 
nication media; emphasizes common methodology of symbol transference. 

201— Parliamentary Procedure. Two hours. 

230 — Voice and Diction. Four hours. 



IOO 



Communication 



A course designed to improve delivery. Exercises in pronunciation, enun- 
ciation, volume control and removal of regional diction errors. 

250 — Advanced Oral Communication. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: PA 101 or consent of instructor. 

Advanced performance course to provide proficiency in research, oral com- 
position, delivery, and audience adaptation. Designed for students desiring 
specialized training in oral communication of ideas. 

310— Forensics. One hour. (May be repeated for six hours credit.) 

Intercollegiate forensic activity. Only two hours can be counted toward 
meeting Public Address degree requirements. 

341 — Persuasion. Four hours. 

Humor, personality, motivation, reasoning, and evidence in their relation- 
ship to opinion and attitude change. Study of research in persuasion in adver- 
tising, social psychology, public opinion and propaganda, and rhetoric. Practical 
problems in the design and presentation of persuasive messages. 

350 — Mass Media and Public Opinion. Four hours. 

An analysis of the interdependent relationships between the structures, 
techniques, and purposes of the mass media and public opinion. Also investi- 
gates the influence of the media on social issues, cultural values, and consumer 
preferences. 

361 — Discussion and Group Leadership. Four hours. 

Methods from dynamic interaction, sociometry, sociodrama, and other 
aspects of group work as related to communication in small management, busi- 
ness and professional, and community service groups; development of leader- 
ship ability and integration in groups. 

370 — Speech Composition. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Designed for the improvement of oral and written style; performance as 
well as theory. 

430-G430 — Business and Industrial Communication. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Survey of problems and principles of communication within business and 
industrial organizations and professional associations. 

432-G432 — Symbolic Function in Persuasion. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Synthesis of communication methodologies from general semantics, field 
theory and cybernetics; application to interdisciplinary problems. 

438-G438— Theories of Speech Behavior. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Interrelationships of psychology and communications, including Communi- 
cation theory, Information Theory, and psycholinguistics. 

441-G441 — Advanced Persuasion. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or PA 341. 

447-G447 — Theories of Mass Communication. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or PA 200. 

Analysis of similarities and differences of process, elements, and effects 
among interpersonal, newspaper, radio, and television; emphasis on construc- 
tion and analysis of communication models. 

451-G451 — Source Credibility and Public Image. Four hours. 

Analysis of communicator and media image as a variable in persuasion and 
propaganda; intensive study of source credibility effects in public relations, 
advertising, and political campaigning. 



IOI 



College of Arts and Sciences 



453-G453 Campaign Speaking. Four hours. 

A study of voter-candidate relationship and issue development. Taught 
during fall quarter of election years only, state or national. 

461-G461 — Advanced Discussion. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: PA 361. 

Application of recent research in areas such as group dynamics to the 
problem-solving group; emphasis on group leadership. 

JOURNALISM 

Students majoring in Journalism are required to complete 40 hours. Re- 
quired courses include: JOU 102, 103, 300, 330, and 401. Majors may elect to 
specialize in news -editorial, public relations, or advertising. 

A minor program in Journalism consists of a minimum of 28 hours. Courses 
should be approved by the Director of Journalism. 

All majors and minors are required to do practical work on the Student 
Printz. Others are invited to participate in the publication of the paper. 
JOU 102 is a prerequisite for all advanced courses unless waived. 

JOURNALISM COURSES (JOU) 

101 — Introduction to Journalism. Four hours. 

History, organization, techniques, and responsibilities of the media of mass 
communication, with emphasis on the newspaper. A first course for those stu- 
dents who have had little or no journalistic experience at the high school level. 

102 — Beginning Reporting. Four hours. 

The study of gathering news and writing simple news stories. Study of 
leads, story structure, rewrites, follow-up assignments, polishing stories. 

103 — Intermediate Reporting. Four hours. 

Writing of complex and special story types: speeches, conventions, inter- 
views, law courts, business, government, politics, criticism, features, society, 
sports, and others. 

300— Journalism Laboratory. One hour. (May be repeated). 

Practical analysis of each issue of the Student Printz. Only four hours may 
be applied toward fulfilling major requirements; only two hours toward ful- 
filling minor requirements. 

301 — Copy Reading. Four hours. 

Introduction to copy reading, headline writing, and make-up. Intensive 
practice in the principles and techniques of copy reading. 

302 — Advanced Editing. Four hours. 

Intensive practice in preparing all types of news copy for publication. 

303 — Newspaper Design and Make-up. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: JOU 301. 

A study of the principles and mechanics of make-up, including a brief' 
history of printing and a study. 

311 — Feature Writing I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: JOU 102 or consent of instructor. 

Procedure and practice in gathering material for the writing of feature 
stories. 

312 — Feature Writing II. Four hours. 

A more intensive writing course with the focus upon the preparation of 
feature stories for magazines. 

330 — Press Photography. Four hours. 



lOl 



Communication 



The relationship of news photography in journalism; the use of simpler 
cameras, and the developing and printing of pictures. Elements of writing cut- 
lines and captions. 

332— Advanced Press Photography. Four hours. 

Advanced developing and printing of photographs. Contemporary problems 
in photojournalism. Pictures for wire transmission. Discussion of latest tech- 
niques, including color. 

341, 342, 343— Newspaper Advertising I, II, III. Four hours each. 
Principles and functions of advertising with emphasis on selling and pro- 
motion, preparation of advertising copy and layouts for newspaper. 
355 — Editorial Writing. Four hours. 

Procedures and techniques of writing editorials with emphasis upon atti- 
tudes, policies, and style. 

400 — History of Journalism. Four hours. 

Development of the newspaper in the United States from 1690 to present. 
The relationship of social, political, and economic factors to the evolution of 
the American Dress. 

401 — Law of the Press. Four hours. 

A study of the precedents and present laws governing the press, radio, 
advertising and photography. Libel, privilege, right of privacy and constitu- 
tional guarantees. 

402 — Advanced Reporting. Four hours. 

A study of interpretative reporting. Completing the account, explanations, 
predictions, providing perspective. Current news problems. 

403 — Specialized Reporting. Four hours. 

Governmental affairs get major emphasis. Labor, science, business, agricul- 
ture, social problems, sports, society and home economics are also covered. 

421-G421— Public Relations. Four hours. 

Total relationship of the institution to its audiences. Origin and develop- 
ment of public relations. 

422- G422— Publicity Methods. Four hours. 

An analysis of the media of communication and their relation to publicity. 
Mechanics of news releases, press conferences, photographs. Publicity function 
in the public relations department. 

423 -G423— Public Relations Practices. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: JOU 421. 

Internal and external publications in industry and institutions. Contem- 
porary problems of public relations. 

431 — Business and Professional Publications. Four hours. 
An analysis of the scope and function of institutional publications which 
will include research, writing, layout, and production. 

443-G443 — Supervision of High School Publications. Four hours. 
A course designed to prepare high school teachers to direct the production 
of the high school newspaper and yearbook. 

455 — Newspaper Organization and Management. Four hours. 
Focuses on the managerial aspects of newspaper production. 

RADIO-TELEVISION 

Students majoring in Radio-Television are required to complete 40 hours. 
Required courses include: RTV 121, 320, 321, 324, 424, 445. Other required 
courses include Public Address 101 and 230, and Journalism 102. Other RTV 
courses are to be selected with the approval of the Director of Radio-Televi- 
sion. 



°3 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Students minoring in Radio-Television are required to complete 28 hours, 
of which RTV 121 is required. All minor programs are to be selected with the 
approval of the Director of Radio-Television. 

Radio-Television majors may elect minor programs in any area approved 
by the University. Recommended minors include: public address, journalism, 
general business, marketing, history, psychology, or political science. 

RTV 121, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite for all advanced courses in 
Radio-Television. 

RADIO-TELEVISION COURSES (RTV) 

121 — Introduction to Radio- TV. Four hours. 

A survey of broadcasting. Students will participate in the operation of 
WMSU. 

320 — Radio Laboratory. One hour (May be repeated). 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

Operation of the campus radio station, WMSU. Practical work in all areas 
of station operation. Only four hours may be used to fulfill degree require- 
ments for majors. Four additional hours will count as electives. 

321 — Radio and Television Announcing. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: RTV 121. 

324— Radio and TV News. Four hours. 

Pictorial and audio reporting of current events. 

326— TV Production. Four hours. 

A course designed to give the advanced broadcasting student an introduc- 
tion into the area of video. Class meets at WDAM-TV. 

350 — Programming Techniques. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: RTV 121, 321. 

Theory and practice of effective commercial and educational radio-televi- 
sion programming. 

360 — Special Techniques in Production. Four hours. 

Open to non-majors and non-minors. Analysis of programming in special 
areas: education, religion, public service, and politics. 

422 — Radio and Television Advertising and Writing. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: RTV 121. 

424-G424 — Radio and Television Law. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

426 -G426— Radio Station Management. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: 12 hours of RTV courses above 121. 

445-G445 — Audience Analysis. Four hours. 

Characteristics of audiences, measurement of attitudes, and a study of 
polling devices and methodologies. 

450 — Advanced Television Production. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: RTV 326. 

Student participation in producing a weekly television series. 

460 — Problems in Broadcast Management. Four hours. 

Analysis of functional relationships in broadcasting with emphasis on union 
agreements, community service, and the financial structure of broadcasting 
stations. 

492 — Special Problems in Radio-Television. One to four hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Research on specific problems. 



104 



Computer Science and Statistics 



General Speech Education 

Students desiring to teach speech on the secondary level are required to 
take 36 hours in the Department of Communication, a 28-hour minor in the 
Department of Theatre, and fulfill the appropriate Secondary Education re- 
quirements listed in that section of the Bulletin. 

Students should plan their program in cooperation with the department 
chairmen of these three areas. 
Major requirements: 

PA 101, 111, 230, 341, 361 20 

Public Address electives 12 

RTV 121 4 

36 

Minor requirements: 

THE 111, 201, 202, 203, 302, 413, 418 28 

SED requirements as listed in the current Bulletin. 

Journalism Education 

Students desiring to teach journalism on the secondary level are required 
to take 40 hours in the Department of Communication in the area of journal- 
ism as well as fulfill the appropriate Secondary Education requirements listed 
in that section of the Bulletin. 

Prospective majors should plan their program in cooperation with the 
departmental chairman; courses will include: JOU 102, 103, 301, 302, 303, 330, 
341, 355, 402, 443. 

DEPARTMENT OF 
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND STATISTICS (CSS) 

Danny R. Carter, Chairman 

Barker, Riley, Russum, Stritch 

The Computer Science and Statistics Department is designed to meet the 
great demand for trained personnel in electronic computers, and statistics in 
business, space and missile programs, engineering, government, and the aca- 
demic world. The Department provides training in digital as well as analog 
computer techniques. Current course offerings provide for an academic major 
and minor in Statistics at the undergraduate level and a minor at the graduate 
level. A student may also elect an undergraduate minor in the area of Com- 
puter Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR 

CSS 435, 436, and 437— Theoretical Statistics 

CSS 415, 416— Methods of Mathematical Statistics 

The remainder of the 36 hours is to be selected with the approval of the 
Department Chairman. Psychology 450 may be taken in the Department of 
Psychology and applied to a major or minor. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR 

The student majoring in Statistics may minor in Computer Science. Courses 
that have been applied to a major in Statistics may not be counted in the Com- 
puter Science minor. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES (CSS) 

200 — Statistical Methods I. Four hours. 

Sampling and sampling distributions: normal distributions, F, T, Chi- 
square tests, confidence limits, analysis of variations. 

201— Statistical Methods II. Four hours. 

Correlations, regression, analysis of covariance, polynomial curve fitting, 
least squares. 



105 



College of Arts and Sciences 



210 — Introduction to Programming Laboratory. Two hours. 
The use of problem oriented languages and peripheal equipment. Pro- 
gramming of problems and use of the computer. 

300 — Introduction to Linear Programming Techniques. Four hours. 
Vectors and Euclidean spaces, linear transformations, convex sets and 
Lyderplanes, theory of simplex method, the transportation problem. 

310 — Digital Computer Programming. Four hours. 

A study of the theory and applications of programming languages for 
digital computers. Programming with basic language of binary and binary 
coded decimal computers, symbolic and compiler programming languages. 

315-316-317 — Applied Techniques in Statistics and Engineering. Four hours 
each. 

Prerequisite: MAT 377 or equivalent. 

Laplace transforms and their applications, least squares, Fourier series and 
integrals, convolutions, Gamma functions, Beta functions, Bessell functions, 
complex inversion integral and conformal mapping. 

400 — Numerical Analysis I. Four hours. 

Finite- difference interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, 
methods of solving linear and non-linear equations and systems of such equa- 
tions, matrix computations. 

401 — Numerical Analysis II. Four hours. 

Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations and systems of such 
equations both initial and boundry value. 

402 — Numerical Analysis III. Four hours. 

Parabolic, elleptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations, the eigen- 
value problem; stability. 

403-G403 — Introduction to Analog Computers. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 378. 

Design and testing of basic analog circuits. 

404-G404 — Advanced Analog and Hybrid Systems. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: CSS 403. 

Use of the analog computer to solve engineering problems. 

410 — Construction of Compilers. Four hours. 

A study of single and multipass compilers with emphasis on the use of 
Polish notations, macros, writing of relocatible subroutines, Fortran II and IV 
compilers. 

412-G412— Educational Statistics. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Elementary probability, conditional probability, binomial experiments, 
curve fitting, least squares techniques, correlation and regression models. 

415- G415— Methods of Mathematical Statistics I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 276 or permission of instructor. 

Continuous and discrete distributions, moments of distributions, point and 
interval estimation, hypothesis testing, power of tests, analysis of variance 
(one-way classification, orthogonal contrasts), two-way classification analysis 
of variance, fixed, random and mixed models. 

416-G416— Methods of Mathematical Statistics II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: CSS 415. 

Orthogonal polynomial contrasts, multi-way classification, simple linear 
regression, multiple linear regression, polynomial regression, designs (simple 
randomized blocks, nested factorials), intra-class correlation, quality control. 

420 — Theory of Approximations. Four hours. 



106 



Economics 



Interpolation, reminder theory, convergence theorems, uniform approxima- 
tions, orthogonal polynomials and economization of power series. 

425- G425— Experimental Design. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: CSS 416. 

Factorials, randomized blocks, Latin squares and split-plot, fractional fac- 
torials and confounding, response surface models. 

427- G427— Sampling Methods. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: CSS 416. 

The planning, execution, and evaluation of sample surveys. Simple random 
sampling, stratified random sampling, cluster sampling. 

430— Advanced Digital Computer Programming. Four hours. 
Advanced programming techniques using machine and symbolic languages, 
selected automatic languages such as ALGOL, COBOL, IPL*V and SIMSCFJPT. 

435-G435— Theoretical Statistics I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 377. 

Basic concepts in probability, moments of distributions, characteristic func- 
tions, multivariate distributions, conditional distributions, transformations, 
Chebychev inequality, convergence in law, probability and convergence almost 
surely. 

436 -G436— Theoretical Statistics II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: CSS 435. 

Properties of estimators (unbiasedness, minimum variance, consistent, 
sufficient, etc.), Helmerts transformation, Central Limit Theorem, Cramer- Rao 
lower bound, uniformly most powerful test. 

437-G437— Theoretical Statistics III. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: CSS 436. 

Linear models, least squares estimators and their applications to certain 
designs, likelihood ratio. 

474-G474 — Boolean Algebra and Switching Circuits. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Symbolic logic and Boolean algebra for description and analysis of switch- 
ing circuits, basic sequential circuits, digital systems design principles. 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS (BA) 

Kenneth R. Grubbs, Chairman 
deArrigunaga, Greene, Lee, McQuiston, Smith 

The Economics program is designed to provide students with the specialized 
tools and knowledge required to analyze the important economic issues in 
human society. The curriculum affords the opportunity to achieve intelligent 
citizenship, private employment, governmental employment, and preparation 
for graduate study. 

Economics is an ideal minor and is highly complementary to a major in any 
social science field. The recommended minor includes Economics 251, 252, 330, 
340, 345, 400, and 470. 

A student majoring in Economics or Foreign Trade and working toward 
the B.A. degree must complete the requirements as outlined below. These in- 
clude the Basic College core, the College of Arts and Sciences requirements, 
the Economics Department requirements, and the minor area requirements. 

Economics course descriptions are found under the Department offerings 
listed in the School of Business Administration section of this catalog. 



I0 7 



College of Arts and Sciences 



SUGGESTED COURSE SCHEDULE 

Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 101, 102, 103— Freshman Composition 12 

History 101, 102— World Civilization 8 

Political Science 101 — American Government 4 

Mathematics 101, 102— College Algebra or MAT 100, 112 8 

Science 12 

Military Science for men 3 

Physical Education (non-credit) 

Basic College Elective (for non-military science students) •. . 4 



47-48 



Sophomore Year 

Philosophy 210 or 101 4 

English 201, 202, 203 12 

Public Address 101, 111; Music 165, 

Art 120 (elect two courses from two fields) 8 

Economics 251, 252 8 

Geography 103, or Psychology 201 or Sociology 103 or 201 4 

Foreign Language 12 

Military Science for men 3 

Physical Education (non-credit) 

Basic College elective (for non-military science students) 4 



51-52 



Departmental Requirements 

Major in Economics 36 

Economics 310 — Economic History of the U. S 4 

Economics 330 — Money and Banking 4 

Economics 340 — Price Theory 4 

Economics 345 — Income Theory 4 

Economics 470 — Comparative Economic Systems 4 

Economics (Electives) . 16 

*Minor requirements and electives** 56-58 

Hours 

*A minor of at least 28 hours may be selected from any department in the University in 
which a major is offered. Free electives may be taken in any department of the Univer- 
sity. 

"♦Students considering graduate work in Economics should consult frequently with de- 
partment advisers, and are urged to take some mathematics courses beyond the minimum 
core requirements. 

Major in Foreign Trade 68 

Accounting 201, 202, 203— Principles of Accounting 12 

Finance 310, 311— Business Law 8 

Political Science 457 or 458 — International Politics or 

International Organization 4 

History or Geography (elective at 300-400 level) 4 

Economics 330 — Money and Banking 4 

Economics 340 — Price Theory 4 

Economics 345 — Income Theory 4 

Economics 435 — International Trade Theory 4 

Economics 436 — International Economics Relations 4 

Economics 470 — Comparative Economic Systems 4 

Economics (Elective) 4 

Foreign Language (three courses in addition to the 

B.A. language requirement) 12 

Electives 24-26 



108 



English and Literature 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND LITERATURE (ENG) 

Charles Moorman, Chairman 

Adams, H. Anderson, J. Anderson, Bahr, Breland, Brinegar, Marice Brown, 

Mitzi Brown, Ruth Brown, Clayton, Downey, Elkins, Eubanks, Fox, Garrow, 

Kay, McCraw, McRaven, Milner, Orange, Phillips, Porter, Reynolds, Riley, 

Simpson, Sims, Smith, Strebeck, Watson, Weatherford 

Requirements for Major 

A student majoring in English may elect one of several alternative plans. 
He may work toward the B.A., the B.S. teaching, or the B.S. non-teaching de- 
gree. For information concerning Master's or Ph.D. degrees, consult the Grad- 
uate Bulletin. The student's choice of program should be determined by his 
plans for the future and in close conjunction with his adviser. 

A. Curriculum — Core and University Requirements 

The student must select the appropriate core and additional university 
courses required for his degree as listed on preceding pages of this catalog. 

B. Curriculum — B.S. Teaching Degree Requirements 

In addition to the departmental requirements listed under C below and the 
general requirements for a Class A teaching certificate, the English major 
working toward the B.S. teaching degree must satisfy the following special re- 
quirements for a Class A teaching certificate: American literature, four hours 
(preferably English 300 or 301); English literature, four hours; Shakespeare, 
four hours (English 423 or 425); and advanced grammar, four hours (English 
433). 

C. Curriculum — Departmental Requirements 

The student wishing to major in English, regardless of his degree plan, 
must take 45 hours in the Department of English, of which 24 hours must be 
in courses numbered 300 or above. Required of all majors are English 101, 102, 
103, 201, 202, and 306 and at least one course from each of the following groups: 

I. English 433, 434, 406, 408, 423, 425, 429, 443, 453, 479, 486, 487, and 488. 

II. English 427, 429, 435, 436, 444, 447, 451, 474, 480, and 483. 
IH. English 300, 301, 410, 414, 415, 416, 418, 419, and 485. 

English 101, 102, 103, and 8 hours of sophomore literature are prerequisites 
for any English courses numbered 300 or above. 

D. Curriculum — Minor and Electives 

In addition to the core and university requirements, the certification re- 
quirements (where applicable), and the departmental requirements, the student 
majoring in English must also complete the requirements for a minor. The 
English major wishing to qualify as a part-time librarian will need 16 hours of 
Library Science — LS 302, 303, 315, 316. Courses not used to fulfill any of these 
requirements are free electives and may be taken in any department of the 
University. 

Requirements for Minors 

The student minoring in English must take 32 hours in the Department of 
English, of which 12 hours must be in courses numbered 300 or above. Recom- 
mended for the minor are English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, and one course from 
each of the three groups of courses designated under C above. 

ENGLISH COURSES (ENG) 

23— Writing Laboratory. No credit. 

101, 102, 103— English Composition I, II, III. Four hours each. Each of the 
three courses is a prerequisite for the next. 

201, 202^Introduction to Literature I, II. Four hours each. ENG 101, 102, 
and 103 are prerequisites for this sophomore series. 



109 



College of Arts and Sciences 



300 — American Literature I. Four hours. 

301 — American Literature II. Four hours. 

306 — Nineteenth- and Twentieth -Century English Literature. Four hours. 

332 — Advanced Expository Prose. Four hours. 

338-339— Creative Writing. Eight hours. 4-4. 

Admission by permission of the instructor. 

346 — The Literature of the Bible. Four hours. 

406-G406— History of the English Language. Four hours. 

408-G408 — Introduction to Linguistics. Four hours. 

410-G410— Colonial and Revolutionary American Literature, 1640-1820. 

Four hours. 

414-G414 — The American Literary Renaissance, 1820-1870. Four hours. 
415-G415 — Nineteenth Century American Fiction. Four hours. 

416-G416— The Rise of Realism in American Literature, 1870-1920. 

Four hours. 

418-G418— The American Novel, 1920-1960. Four hours. 

419-G419 — Modern American Poetry. Four hours. 

423-G423 — Shakespeare's Comedies and Tragicomedies. Four hours. 

425-G425 — Shakespeare's Histories and Tragedies. Four hours. 

427-G427— The English Novel. Four hours. 

429-G429 — Sixteenth- Century English Literature. Four hours. 

430-G430, 431-G431, 432-G432— Tutorial in Comparative Literature. 
Twelve hours. 4-4-4. 

433-G433, 434-G434— Advanced Grammar and Rhetoric. Eight hours. 4-4. 
ENG 433 places emphasis upon mastery of the fundamentals of grammar to 
achieve effective instruction at the secondary school level. It is a prerequisite 
for 434-G434, which emphasizes recent non- traditional trends in the teaching 
of grammar and composition. 

435-G435, 436 -G436— Nineteenth -Century Poetry and Prose. Eight hours. 
4-4. 

443-G443 — Reading from World Literature I. Four hours. 

444-G444 — Reading from World Literature II. Four hours. 

445-G445 — Literary Criticism. Four hours. 

447-G447 — Major Writers of Eighteenth Century. Four hours. 

451-G451 — Restoration and Eighteenth- Century Drama. Four hours. 

453-G453 — Medieval English Literature. Four hours. 

473 -G473— Analysis of Poetry. Four hours. 

474-G474 — The Modern European Novel. Four hours. 

479-G479— Development of English Drama to 1642. Four hours. 

480-G480 — Modern European Poetry. Four hours. 

483 -G483— Modern Drama. Four hours. 

485 -G485— Literature of the South. Four hours. 

486-G486— Seventeenth- Century Prose and Poetry. Four hours. 

487 -G487— Milton. Four hours. 

488-G488— Chaucer. Four hours. 

489-G489— Literature and the Arts. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: At least one English course numbered 300 or above in a pre- 
vious quarter or consent of the instructor. 



no 



Foreign Languages 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Thomas T. Chisholm, Chairman 

Anderson, Edwards, Felsher, Fontecchio, Johnson, Moorman, Neumann, Scheel, 

Siverio, Tomasziwskyj 

Foreign Languages Majors and Minors: Candidates for either the Bachelor 
of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree may choose a major or minor in 
French, German, or Spanish. The requirement for a major, in terms of hours, 
is 24 quarter hours in courses numbered above 300. Two college years (24 
hours) or its equivalent in high school and college courses is the prerequisite 
to beginning study at the level of the major or minor. The requirement for a 
minor is 12 hours above 300, with a minimum total of 28 hours. 

Suggested Curriculum for Bachelor of Arts Degree 
with a Major in French, German, or Spanish 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Hours 
Courses listed in B.A. Core 
The first two years of major language* 24 

Junior and Senior Years 

Language to complete major** 12 to 24 

Minor and electives 44 to 56 

♦Students who have had two years of a language in high school will take a placement 
test in order to determine the level at which they will begin their language study in 
the University. 
**The phonetics course is required for French and Spanish majors. 

Suggested Curriculum for Bachelor of Science Degree 
with a Major in French, German, or Spanish 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Courses listed in B.S. Core 

The first two years of major language* 24 

Junior and Senior Years 

Language to complete major** 12 to 24 

Education 300, 313, 4511, 469, 4811 28 

Psychology 319, 332 8 

Fine Arts 4 

Electives 30 to 42 

♦Students who have had two years of a language in high school will take a placement 
test in order to determine the level at which they will begin their language study in 
the University. 
**The phonetics course is required for French and Spanish majors. 

Related Majors: The major in Foreign Trade (see Economics, B.A.) includes 
a study of the Spanish language and of Latin American literature and culture 
and automatically gives the student a minor in Spanish. Credit in French 
is accepted for Latin American students who major in Foreign Trade. 

Language Laboratory: Language courses on the first and second year levels 
will meet five hours per week: four hours regular class sessions and one hour 
in the laboratory. 

Registration for Courses: It is understood that a student, whether studying 
a foreign language as a part of his core curriculum, as a requirement in a re- 
lated major, or as a major or minor in itself, will begin the language in the 
University at the level of his achievement at the time of entrance (to be de- 



III 



College of Arts and Sciences 



termined by a placement test). If he should be placed in a language course 
above the beginning level, he will not receive university hours of credit for 
the courses not studied in the University. 

Credit Transferred from Foreign Schools: Students wishing to transfer 
language credit from institutions outside the United States may be required 
to undergo examination to determine how to equate such credit and to estab- 
lish the level at which study might be resumed here. 

Class Attendance: Because of the special nature of teaching and learning 
a foreign language, a maximum amount of "contact time" is essential. Foreign 
language students, therefore, are expected to attend all classes except those 
from which they are excused due to reason of illness, administrative sanction, 
or the judgment of the instructor. The student is responsible for the home- 
work assigned regardless of his reason for missing a class. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES 
FRENCH (FRE) 

Anderson, Chisholm, Edwards, Felsher, Johnson 

101, 102, 103— First Year French. Four hours each. 

201, 202, 203— Second Year French. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: FRE 103, or the equivalent, and consent of the instructor. 

305, 306, 307 — Introduction to French Literature. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: FRE 203, or the equivalent. 

341 — Beginning Conversation French. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: FRE 203, or 103 and consent of the instructor. 

342 — Advanced Conversation and Phonetics. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: FRE 203. 

343 — Advanced Grammar and Composition. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: FRE 203. 

405-G405 — French Classicism. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: FRE 307. 

406-G406 — French Romanticism. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: FRE 307. 

407-G407 — French Realism and Naturalism. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: FRE 307. 

421-G421— French Literature of the Twentieth Century. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: FRE 307. 

492-G492 — Advanced Readings in French. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: FRE 307. 

May be repeated for credit when topics vary. 
GERMAN (GER) 

Anderson, Chisholm, Neumann, Scheel, Tomasziwskij 

101, 102, 103— First Year German. Four hours each. 

201, 202, 203— Second Year German. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: GER 103, or 123, or the equivalent, and consent of the in- 
structor. 

121, 122, 123— First Year Scientific German. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: None. 

A beginning course in German for science majors. 

221, 222, 223— Second Year Scientific German. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: GER 123, or 103, or the equivalent, and consent of the in- 
structor. 



Ill 



Foreign Languages 



305, 306, 307— Introduction to German Literature. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: GER 203 or the equivalent. 

341, 342, 343 — Conversation and Composition. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: GER 203. 

405-G405 — German Classicism. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: GER 307. 

406-G406 — German Romanticism. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: GER 307. 

407-G407 — German Realism and Naturalism. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: GER 307. 

421-G421 — Contemporary German Literature. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: GER 307. 

492-G492 — Advanced Readings in German. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: GER 307. 

May be repeated for credit when topics vary. 

GREEK (GRE) 

Moorman 
101, 102, 103— First Year Greek. Four hours each. 
201, 202, 203— Second Year Greek. Four hour each. 
Prerequisites: GRE 103, or the equivalent, and consent of the instructor. 

ITALIAN (ITA) 

Fontecchio 
101, 102, 103— First Year Italian. Four hours each. 
201, 202, 203— Second Year Italian. Four hours each. 
Prerequisites: ITA 103, or the equivalent, and consent of the instructor. 

LATIN (LAT) 

Moorman 
101, 102, 103— First Year Latin. Four hours each. 
201, 202, 203— Second Year Latin. Four hours each. 
Prerequisites: LAT 103, or the equivalent, and consent of the instructor. 

RUSSIAN (RUS) 

Tomasziwskij 

101, 102, 103— First Year Russian. Four hours each. 

201, 202, 203— Second Year Russian. Four hours each. 

Prerequisites: RUS 103, or the equivalent, and consent of the instructor. 
SPANISH (SPA) 

Anderson, Edwards, Felsher, Fontecchio, Scheel, Siverio 

101, 102, 103— First Year Spanish. Four hours each. 

201, 202, 203— Second Year Spanish. Four hours each. 

Prerequisites: SPA 103, or the equivalent, and consent of the instructor. 

304 — Commercial Spanish. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 203. 

Designed especially for majors in foreign trade. Letter writing and busi- 
ness forms. 

305 — Survey of Spanish Literature up to 1700. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 203. 

306 — Survey of Spanish Literature from 1700 up to the Contemporary 
Period. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 203. 

307 — Survey of Latin American Literature. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 203. 



II 3 



College of Arts and Sciences 



341 — Beginning Conversation. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 203. 

342 — Advanced Conversation and Phonetics. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 203. 

343 — Advanced Grammar and Composition. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 203. 

405-G405— The Golden Age. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 305. 

406-G406 — Nineteenth Century Literature of Spain. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 306. 

407-G407 — The Generation of 98 and Contemporary Literature of Spain. 

Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 306. 

421-G421 — Cervantes and the Renaissance. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SPA 305. 

492-G492 — Advanced Readings in Spanish. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: SPA 305, 306, or 307. May be repeated for credit when topics 
vary. 

DEPARTMENT OF 
GEOGRAPHY (GHY) AND GEOLOGY (GLY) 

Arthell Kelley, Chairman 

Geography: Bean, Bounds, Coleman, R. Hatcher, McKee 

Geology: B. W. Brown, Bowen, Paulson 

GEOGRAPHY: 

Requirements for Major 

A student majoring in Geography may select one of several alternative 
plans. He may work toward either the B.A., the B.S. teaching, or the B.S. non- 
teaching degree. The student's choice of program should be determined by his 
plans for the future and in close conjunction with his adviser. 

A. Curriculum — College Core 

The student working toward either degree must include the appropriate 
core curriculum subjects for his degree. The student majoring in Geography 
should elect Geography 103 among his core subjects. 

B. Curriculum — Teaching Requirements. 

The student working toward the B.S. teaching degree must include in his 
program the courses leading toward the Class A teaching certificate. 

C. Curriculum — Department Requirements 

1. General Requirements: 

The student wishing to major in Geography, regardless of his degree plan, 
must take 44 hours in the Department, of which 28 hours must be in geography 
courses numbered above 200. Required of all majors are Geography 103, 143, 
200, 203 or 204. All majors should have 16 hours in introductory courses, 12 
hours in regional courses, and 12 hours in functional courses. 

2. Students wishing to qualify for government service should have 45 hours 
in Geography. 

D. Curriculum — Minor and Electives 

In addition to the core requirements, the certification requirements and 
the departmental requirements, the student majoring in Geography must also 
complete the requirements for a minor, preferably in a related field. Courses 
not used to fulfill any of these requirements are free electives and may be 
taken in any department of the University. 



114 



Geography 



Requirements for Minor 

The student minoring in Geography must take 28 hours in the Department 
of which 20 hours must be in geography courses numbered above 200. Recom- 
mended for the minor are GHY 103 or 143, and 370. 

GEOGRAPHY COURSES (GHY) 

103— Principles of Global Geography. Four hours. 
An introductory course in world regional geography. 
143 — Introductory Economic Geography. Four hours. 

A study of the leading commodities, minerals, and industries of the world 
in their regional settings. 

200 — Cartography. Four hours. 

An introductory course in methods of map-making. 

203 — Physical Geography. Four hours. 

A study of selected elements of physical geography: earth-sun relations, 
climate, natural vegetation. 

204 — Physical Geography. Four hours. 

A study of selected elements of physical geography: land forms, water re- 
sources, and soils. 

231 — Geography of Mississippi. Four hours. 

A regional geography of Mississippi. 

301 — Cultural Geography. Four hours. 

A study of the human occupance of the earth emphasizing population dis- 
tribution, cultural regions, and processes of man's modification of the earth. 

318 — Geography of South America. Four hours. 

A regional study of South America. 

320 — Geography of the Caribbean Countries. Four hours. 

A regional study of Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies. 

338 — Geography of Europe. Four hours. 

A regional study of Western, Southern, and Eastern Europe. 

340 — Geography of Africa. Four hours. 

A regional study of Africa with emphasis on the Sub-Sahara regions. 

341 — Geography of Australia and Pacific Islands. Four hours. 

Regional geography of Australia and the Pacific Islands. 

370 — World Political Geography. Four hours. 

A study of geography and politics in a world divided. 

376 — Conservation of Natural Resources. Four hours. 

A study of the problems of conservation of the natural resources of the 
United States. 

410 or G410 — Geography of the United States and Canada. Four hours. 

A regional study of Anglo-American. 

412 — Aerial Photograph Interpretation. Four hours. 

431 — Geography of the South. Four hours. 

433 — Geography of Southwest Asia. Four hours. 

A regional geography of the Middle East. 

437 -G437— Geography of USSR. Four hours. 

A regional survey of the physical, economic, and cultural geography of the 
U.S.S.R. 

439-G439 — Geography of Monsoon Asia. Four hours. 

A regional study, with emphasis on India, China, Japan, and Indonesia. 

445-G445— Industrial and Commercial Geography. Four hours. 

Includes a short survey of geographic principles governing secondary and 
tertiary production. 



Il 5 



College of Arts and Sciences 



450-G450 — Physiography of North America. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: GLY 101 and 103 or consent of instructor. 

A study of character of the physiographic provinces of North America. 

460-G460 — Historical Geography. Four hours. 

A study of how geography has influenced exploration, settlement, political, 
and industrial development in America. 

480-G480— Climatology. Four hours. 

Analysis of climatic control and elements; climate conditions in each of 
the continents. 

484-G484 — Urban Geography. Four hours. 

Nature, distribution, principal functions of urban settlements and support- 
ing areas, with emphasis on the United States and local field study. 

485-G485 — Field Geography. Four hours. 

A study of the techniques of reconnaissance and detailed field work, includ- 
ing classification of natural and cultural features and preparation of reports and 
maps based on field data. Instruction will cover the use of the compass and 
hand level, the plane table, and aerial photographs in field mapping. 

490 — Problems in Geography. Four hours. 

Undergraduate majors only. 

GEOLOGY: 

A student majoring in Geology may elect either the B.A. or B.S. degree 
program. He should satisfy his; core requirements for either degree during his 
freshman and sophomore years and at the same time complete one year of 
chemistry, mathematics through analytical geometry, and Geology 101, 103, 
and 260. 

For the Bachelor of Science in Geology, the following courses, in addition 
to the requirements of the Basic College and the College of Arts and Sciences, 
are required: 

Mathematics (through analytic geometry) 12-16 hours 

Chemistry 101-102-103 (or 121-122-123) 12-15 hours 

Physics 101-102-103 (or 201-202-203) 15 hours 

Geology 101, 103, 201, 260, 302, 303, 310, 314, 330, 401, 

and four other hours from departmental offerings 44 hours 

Summer Field Camp (Geology 480) 9 hours 

A minor of 28 hours is also required. Suggested minors include the follow - 
lowing: biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer science, or geo- 
graphy. 

SUGGESTED GEOLOGY 4- YEAR CURRICULUM 

A curriculum which prepares the student for professional employment or 
advanced study in geology is suggested below: 

Freshman Year* 

Fall Winter Spring 

CHE 101 CHE 102 CHE 103 

ENG 101 ENG 102 ENG 103 

GLY 101 GLY 103 GLY 201 

MAT 101 MAT 103 MAT 171 

Sophomore Year* 

Fall Winter Spring 

PHY 101 (or 201) PHY 102 (or 202) PHY 103 (or 203) 

ENG 201 ENG 332 MUS 165, ART 120, 

HIS 101 HIS 102 or THE 103 

GLY 260 PHI 210 GHY 103 

ECO 201 or 251 



Il6 



Geology 





Junior Year 




Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


GLY 310 


GLY 314 


GLY 330 


PA 101 


GLY 302 


GLY 303 


PSY 201 or 


CHE 304 


CHE 305 


SOC 103 or 201 


CSS 200 


Elective 


PS 101 


Summer Field Camp (9) 
Senior Year 




Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


CHE 371 


CHE 372 


GLY 420, 422, or 445 


GER, FRE, or RUS I 


GER, FRE, or RUS II 


GER, FRE, or RUS m 


GLY 301 


GLY 311 


GLY 402 


Minor Elective 


Minor Elective 


Minor Elective 


(300 or over) 


(300 or over) 


(300 or over) 



♦Physical Education, six quarters, is required of all students in freshman and sophomore 
years, and ROTC is required for all male students (six quarters) in freshman and 
sophomore years. 

At the discretion of the Department nine specified quarter hours from 
geology, mathematics, physics, chemistry, or biology may be substituted for 
Geology 480. Normally this substitution is permitted only for women students 
and physically handicapped students. 

The Department has a cooperative arrangement with the Gulf Coast Re-' 
search Laboratory. Certain courses in marine sedimentation may be taken at 
the Laboratory; these are generally taught in the summer. 

GEOLOGY MINOR AND PREPARATION FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION, EARTH 
SCIENCE TEACHING 

The following courses are suggested for students seeking a geology minor 
or preparation for earth science teaching in secondary schools: Geol. 101, 103, 
201, 203, 260, 310, and 314 or 302. 

GEOLOGY COURSES (GLY) 

101 — Physical Geology. Four hours. 

Three lectures and two hours laboratory per week. 

An introduction to earth science, including the physical processes respon- 
sible for shaping the major features of the landscape; laboratory study of com- 
mon minerals and rocks and various geologic processes. A half-day field trip 
may be required. 

103— Historical Geology. Four hours. 

Three lectures and two hours laboratory per week; field trip required. 

Prerequisite: GLY 101. 

A study of earth history as revealed in the character and fossil content of 
rocks. 

201 — Geomorphology. Four hours. 

Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week; field trips. 

Prerequisites: GLY 101 and 103. 

Study of the landscape and its origin through geologic processes, with 
examples illustrated by topographic maps, air photographs, and field observa- 
tion. 

203— Introduction to the Geology of the Southeastern States. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week; field trips. 

Prerequisites: GLY 101, 103. 

An introduction to the geology of the southeastern states; field trips in 
Mississippi and adjacent states. 



"7 



College of Arts and Sciences 



260 — Introduction to Minerals and Rocks. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week; field trips. 

Prerequisite: GLY 101, CHE 102 or 122. 

Elementary crystallography, sight recognition of the more common min- 
erals with intensive study of the diagnostic rock-forming minerals; introduc- 
tion to rocks. 

302 — Invertebrate Paleontology. Four hours. 

Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week; field trips. 

Prerequisites: GLY 103 and permission of instructor. 

Invertebrate fossils from the Protozoa through Conodontophoridia with 
attention to taxonomy, morphological features, and geologic distribution. 

303 — Paleoecology. Four hours. 

Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week; field trips. 

Prerequisite: GLY 302. 

A study of the relationship between ancient organisms and the environ- 
ment in which they lived. 

310 — Mineralogy. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week; field trips. 

Prerequisites: GLY 260 and either CHE 103 or CHE 123. The chemistry 
may be taken concurrently. 

Physical, descriptive, chemical, and determinative mineralogy. 

311 — Optical Mineralogy. Four hours. 

Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: GLY- 310 and MAT 103. 

Introduction to optical mineralogy. 

314 — Petrology. Four hours. 

Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week; field trips. 

Prerequisite: GLY 260; GLY 310 recommended. 

A study of the origin, description, and classification of igneous, sedimen- 
tary, and metamorphic rocks. 

330 — Structural Geology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week; field trips. 

Prerequisites: GLY 103 and MAT 103. 

Principles of rock deformation. 

401 — Principles of Stratigraphy. Four hours. 

Four hours lecture; week-end field trip. 

Prerequisites: GLY 260, 302, 330. 

402-G402 — Stratigraphy of North America I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: GLY 401. 

Stratigraphy of the Precambrian and Paleozoic eras. Field trips. 

403-G403 — Stratigraphy of North America II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: GLY 401. 

Stratigraphy of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic eras. Field trips. 

420-G420— Sedimentology. Four hours. 

Two hours lectures and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: GLY 314, PHY 103 (or 203). 

Study of sedimentary materials, their formation, transportation, deposition, 
and lithification. Field trips. 

422-G422— Petroleum Geology. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: GLY 3M, 330, 401. 

The origin, occurrence, and accumulation of oil and natural gas; field trips. 

445-G445 — Economic Geology. Four hours. 
Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: GLY 310, 314, and 330. 

Principles of one deposits; introduction to fuels and non-metallic minerals, 
deposits. Written reports will be required; field trips. 



n8 



History 



452-G452— Physical Marine Geology. 1% hours per week, but not to exceed 
6 weeks or 9 quarter hours. Gulf Coast Research Laboratory. 

Prerequisites: GLY 103, 310, and 420, or permission of instructor. 

A general introduction to the physical processes at work on the shores of 
Mississippi Sound with emphasis on the erosional and depositional effects of 
waves and currents at different stages of tide. 

453 -G453— Chemical Marine Geology, iy 2 hours per week, but not to ex- 
ceed 6 weeks or 9 quarter hours. Gulf Coast Research Laboratory. 

Prerequisites: GLY 103, 310, 420, and CHE 201 and 203, or permission of 
instructor. 

Supervised research in the chemistry of the waters and sediments of Mis- 
sissippi Sound. 

454-G454 — Problems in Marine Sedimentation. iy 2 hours per week, but not 
to exceed 6 weeks or 9 quarter hours. Gulf Coast Research Laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Supervised study of selected aspects of marine sedimentation along the 
Gulf Coast. 

461-G461 — Petrography. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: GLY 311 and 314. 

Systematic study of rocks by means of the polarizing microscope. 

468-G468 — Micropaleontology I. Four hours. 

One hour lecture and six hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: GLY 302 and 303. 

Taxonomy, morphology, and stratigraphic use of Foraminifera; field trips. 

469-G469 — Micropaleontology II. Four hours. 

One hour lecture and six hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: GLY 302 and 303. 

Taxonomy, morphology, and stratigraphic use of Ostracoda; field trips. 

480 — Geology Summer Field Camp. Nine hours. 

iy 2 hours credit per week in the field. 

Prerequisites: GLY 101, 103, 260, and 330. 

Geologic field methods, collection of field data, and compilation of geo- 
logical reports. 

485 — Problems in Geology. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department head. 

Independent study or research designed for the needs of individual stu- 
dents. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY (HIS) 

J. Treadwell Davis, Chairman 

Bond, Bowers, R. Brent, Clark, Coker, Fike, Gonzales, Harper, McCarty, Posey, 

Scarborough, Skates, Stout, Turner. 

The Department of History participates in programs leading to the degrees 
of the B.A., the B.S., the M.A., the M.S., and the Ph.D. For the Master's and 
Ph.D. degrees please consult the Graduate Bulletin. 

Major Requirements 

A baccalaureate student majoring in History may elect one of three degree 
plans: the B.A.; the B.S. non-teaching; or the B.S. teaching degree with a 
license in social studies for secondary schools. His choice of degree program 
should be determined by his plans for the future and in close conjunction with 
his adviser. 

A. Curriculum — Basic College Core 

The student working toward any degree must include in his curriculum 
the required core subjects. 

B. Curriculum — Professional Requirements 



"9 



College of Arts and Sciences 



The History major working toward the B.S. teaching degree with a 
secondary school license in social studies must include in his program (1) the 
education courses required for the Class A teaching certificate (Education will 
normally be the minor for a History major seeking a teacher's license); and 
(2) the following social studies courses, either as core or as electives: Eco- 
nomics 200 (or 251 and 252), Geography 370, Political Science 101 (required as 
core), History 367, and Sociology 103 or 201. 
C. Curriculum — Departmental Requirements 

The student majoring in History, regardless of his degree plan, must take 
History 101, 102, 251, and 252. History 101 and 102 will not count toward the 
36 hours required for a major or toward the 28 hours required for a minor. 
Minor Requirements 

The student minoring in History must take 28 hours in history courses 
numbered above 102. History 101 and 102 are prerequisites for advanced courses 
in European History; History 251 and 252 are prerequisites for advanced courses 
in U.S. History. 
Requirements to teach social studies as a second field 

Students wishing to teach social studies in secondary schools as a second 
field (most high schools in Mississippi desire teachers certified to teach in more 
than one field) should take the following courses, either as core or as electives: 

History 101, 102, 251, 252 and 367 20 

Secondary Education 451L 4 

Political Science 101 (core requirement) 4 

Economics 200 (or 251 and 252) 4 or 8 

Sociology 103 or 201 4 

Geography 370 4 

Social Studies electives 8 or 4 

This list is designed to cover the principal social studies fields a high school 
teacher might be called upon to teach. 

HISTORY COURSES (HIS) 

Students should not enroll in advanced history courses without having 
taken the appropriate European or American survey courses: History 101 and 
102, or History 251 and 252. 

Three hundred level courses should usually precede four hundred level 
courses. In no case should a student take a three hundred level course after 
having taken a four hundred level course in that specific field. 

Economics 310 and Religion 205, 401, and 402 may be elected as history if 
approved by the student's adviser. 

101— World Civilization to 1648 A.D. Four hours. 

102— World Civilization Since 1648 A.D. Four hours. 

251— U.S. to 1865. Four hours. 

252— U.S. Since 1865. Four hours. 

300— The Ancient World. Four hours. 

305— The Middle Ages. Four hours. 

307 — Renaissance. Four hours. 

309 — Reformation. Four hours. 

320 — Early English History. Four hours. 

322 — Modern English History. Four hours. 

330 — Colonial Latin America. Four hours. 

332 — Modern Latin America. Four hours. 

367 — Mississippi History. Four hours. 

370— U.S. Military History. Four hours. 

391 — Traditional China. Four hours. 



IXO 



History 

392— Modern China. Four hours. 

401-G401— Russia to 1800. Four hours. 

402-G402— Nineteenth Century Russia. Four hours. 

403- G4Q3— Russia Since 1917. Four hours. 

404-G404^-Russian Intellectual History. Four hours. 

405-G405— The Cold War Issues. Four hours. 

411-G411 — English Constitutional History. Four hours. 

413-G413— Western Intellectual History. Four hours. 

421-G421 — Ancient Greece. Four hours. 

423-G423 — The Roman Republic and Empire. Four hours. 

424-G424— Medieval World I, Economic and Social History. Four hours. 

425-G425— Medieval World II, Culture and Letters. Four hours. 

427-G427— The Age of Absolutism in Europe, 1648-1789. Four hours. 

430-G430 — Modern Germany. Four hours. 

432-G432 — French Revolution and Napoleon. Four hours. 

433-G433— Europe, 1815-1870. Four hours. 

434-G434— Europe, 1870-1918. Four hours. 

435-G435— Europe, 1918-1939. Four hours. 

436-G436— Europe Since 1939. Four hours. 

437-G437— Modern France. Four hours. 

439-G439— Tudor- Stuart Britain. Four hours. 

441-G441 — Nineteenth Century Britain. Four hours. 

442-G442 — Twentieth Century Britain. Four hours 

445-G445 — The British Commonwealth. Four hours. 

451-G451— U.S. Intellectual and Social History to 1865. Four hours. 

453-G453— U.S. Intellectual and Social History since 1865. Four hours. 

455-G455— The Old South. Four hours. 

457-G457— The New South. Four hours. 

459-G459 — History of Mexico. Four hours. 

465-G465 — The Caribbean and the Spanish Borderlands. Four hours. 

467-G467 — (Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Four hours. 

469-G469— United States Constitutional History to 1861. Four hours. 

470-G470— United States Constitutional History Since 1861. Four hours. 

475 -G475— United States Foreign Relations to 1898. Four hours. 

477-G477— United States Foreign Relations Since 1898. Four hours. 

481-G481-^Colonial America, 1607-1754. Four hours. 

482-G482— Revolutionary Era, 1754-1789. Four hours. 

484-G484 — American Political Leaders. Four hours. 

492 -G492— Special Problems, I, n, III. One hour each. 

495-G495— Age of Hamilton, Jefferson, and Jackson, 1789-1840. Four hours. 

496-G496— The Sectional Controversy and the Civil War, 1840-1865. Four 
hours. 

497-G497 — Reconstruction and the Emergence of Modern America, 1865- 
1898. Four hours. 

498-G498 — The Progressive Era, World War I, Prosperity and Depression, 
1898-1933. Four hours. 

499-G499— The New Deal, World War n, and Post War America, 1933- 
present. Four hours. 



Ill 



College of Arts and Sciences 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS (MAT) 

B. O. Van Hook, Acting Chairman 

Crocker, Essary, Felder, Garrow, Hare, Kelly, Lambright, Munn, 
Nicholson, Smith, Webster 

The Department of Mathematics offers a major and minor for students who 
are candidates for the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science, the Master 
of Arts or the Master of Science degrees. Also, graduate study beyond the Mas- 
ter's degree is available, anticipating the granting of the Ph.D. degree in the 
near future. For information concerning the Master's degrees and graduate 
study beyond the Master's degree, consult the Graduate Bulletin. The courses 
required for a baccalaureate major are listed below by sets in order to facili- 
tate the proper selection of course sequences. 

(a) Mathematics 276, 277, 377, 378 

(b) Mathematics 405, 326, 341 

(c) Mathematics 401, 406, 407, 411, 415, 416, 418, 420, 423, 424, 425, 
426, 431, 435, 441, 442, 443, 461, 462, 471, 472, 473, 484, 485 

Requirements for Majors: Hrs. 

(1) All courses in set (a) 16 

(2) Two courses from set (b) 8 

(3) Five courses from set (c) 20 

Total 44 

Recommendations for Minors: Hrs. 

(1) All courses in set (a) 16 

(2) Three courses from sets (b) or (c) 12 

Total 28 

The curriculum of the Department of Mathematics is designed to meet the 
following objectives: 

(i) prepare students for industrial or commercial employment, 
(ii) prepare students to teach secondary school mathematics, 
(iii) prepare students for graduate study in mathematics. 

The following courses are strongly recommended for: 

(1) Prospective Elementary School Teachers: MAT 100, 318, 321, 338, 341. 
If other courses are desired, 101, 102, 103. 

(2) Prospective Teachers of Secondary School Mathematics: The State cer- 
tification requirements in mathematics for a Class A certificate are: 
24 semester or 36 quarter hours to include the following: 
(i) 15 semester or 24 quarter hours to include algebra, trigonom- 
etry, analytical geometry and calculus, 
(ii) 9 semester or 12 quarter hours to include at least two of the 
following areas: abstract algebra, modern geometry, founda- 
tions of mathematics, probability and statistics. 

Courses recommended for (ii) are: MAT 326, 341, 401, 407, 420, 423, 471. If 
other mathematics courses are desired, the student should take courses that 
will prepare him to do graduate work in mathematics. 

(3) Mathematics majors who plan graduate study: MAT 423, 424, 426, 431, 
441, 442, 443 

(4) Mathematics majors preparing for industrial employment: MAT 406, 
411, 415, 416, 418, 420, 425, 435, 441, 442, 443 and at least a minor in 
physics. 



Ill 



Mathematics 



The following program is recommended for the first two years of study 
toward a baccalaureate degree for mathematics majors: 



Freshman Year: 












Fall Quarter 




Winter Quarter 


Spring Quarter 




ENG 


101 


ENG 102 


ENG 




103 


MAT 


101 


MAT 102 


MAT 




171 


HIS 


101 


MAT 103 


PS 




101 


PA 


101 


HIS 102 


MUS 165, 


ART 


120 


MS 


101 


MS 102 


or HTH 




179 


PE 


— 


PE — 


MS 
PE 




103 


Sophomore Year: 












ENG 


201 


ENG 202, 332 or 433 


PHI 




210 


MAT 


276 


MAT 277 


MAT 




377 


Lab. Science 




Lab. Science 


Lab. Science 




GHY 


103 


PSY 201 


ECO 


200 or 


251 


MS 


201 


MS 202 


MS 




203 


PE 


— 


PE — 


PE 




— 



MAT 378 and MAT 405 or MAT 326 or MAT 341 should be taken during 
the fall quarter of the junior year. The candidate for a B.S. degree should take 
a second year of laboratory science during the junior year. 

Students will be expected to adhere to the indicated prerequisites for each 
course. 

MATHEMATICS COURSES (MAT) 

100 — Basic Mathematics. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: One unit of high school algebra. 

A study of the fundamental concepts of logic, the integers, rational num- 
bers, laws of algebra and discrete statistics. 

101-102— College Algebra I, II. Four hours each. 
Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra or MAT 100. 

103 — Plane Trigonometry. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 101 or its equivalent. 

112 — Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra or MAT 100. 

171 — Analytic Geometry. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 103. 

276, 277— Calculus I, II. Four hours each. 
Prerequisite: MAT 171 for 276, 276 for 277. 

318-G318— Basic Concepts of Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers. 

Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 100 or its equivalent. (Open only to elementary educa- 
tion majors; graduate credit only toward master's degree in education earned 
in an in-service course.) 

321 -G321— Foundations of Mathematics for Junior High School Teachers. 

Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 100 or its equivalent. (Open only to elementary educa- 
tion majors; graduate credit only toward master's degree in education earned 
in an in-service course.) 



113 



College of Arts and Sciences 



326 — Linear Algebra I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 378. MAT 326 may be taken concurrently with MAT 378. 

338 — History of Mathematics. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 276. (Correspondence only) 

341 — Foundations of Mathematics. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 277. 

A study of set theory, logic and arithmetic of cardinal and ordinal numbers. 

378, 379— Calculus III, IV. Four hours each. 
Prerequisite: MAT 277 for 377, MAT 377 for 378. 

401-G401 — Geometry. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 341. 

405 — Differential Equations I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 378. MAT 405 may be taken concurrently with MAT 378. 

406-G406 — Numerical Analysis I. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 378. 

407-G407 — Number Theory. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 341. 

411-G411 — Vector Analysis. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 378. 

415-G415 — Differential Equation* II. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: MAT 406 and MAT 405. MAT 416 may be taken concurrently. 

416-G416 — Numerical Analysis II. Four hours. 

418-G418 — Linear Programming. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 326. 

420-G420— Statistics and Probability. Four hours. 
Prerequisites: MAT 378 and MAT 341. 

423-G423— Modern Algebra I. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 341. 

A development of the integers; rational, real and complex number systems 
with emphasis on their algebraic structure. 

424-G424 — Modern Algebra II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 423. 

A study of groups rings, vector spaces and algebras. 

425-G425 — Fourier Series. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 405. 

426-G426— Linear Algebra II. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 326. 

431-G431 — Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 441. 

435-G435 — Laplace Transform. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 405. 

441-G441, 442-G442, 443-G443— Advanced Calculus I, II, III. Four hours each. 
Prerequisites: MAT 378 and MAT 341. 

461-G461, 462-G462— Projective Geometry I, II. Four hours each. 
Prerequisite: MAT 401. 

471-G471 — General Topology. Four hours. 
Prerequisites: MAT 378 and MAT 341. 

472-G472 — Algebraic Topology. Four hours. 
Prerequisites: MAT 424 and MAT 471. 

473-G473— Metric Spaces. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MAT 471. 



12,4 



Military Science 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE (MS) 

James E. Echols, Jr., Chairman 

Basinger, Bottoms, Bozeman, Dorland, Edwards, Frier, Massey, 
Meadors, Nash, Rouchon, Sturgeon, Williams, Withrow 

AUTHORIZATION 

The University of Southern Mississippi was authorized by the Department 
of the Army to activate a unit of the Senior Division Reserve Officers Training 
Corps (ROTC) on April 3, 1950. The unit was organized June 14, 1950, under 
the authority of the Act of Congress, June 3, 1916, and subsequent amendments 
thereto. 

MISSION 

The mission of the ROTC program is to produce qualified commissioned 
officers for the United States Army and to provide citizenship and leadership 
training for all male students during their freshman and sophomore years in 
the University. 

TRAINING COURSES AND ALLOWANCE 

The ROTC program covers four academic years and is divided into two 
courses. The Basic Course consists of Military Science I and II (MS I & II) and 
is taught during the freshman and sophomore years, and the Advanced Course, 
Military Science III and IV (MS III & IV), is taught during the junior and 
senior years. 

The Basic Course 

All qualified male freshmen are required to complete the Basic Course 
(MS I & II) as a part of the Basic College Core Curriculum. Once a cadet is 
enrolled in the Basic Course, beginning with the quarter he enters the Uni- 
versity, he must continue with the program in successive quarters and com- 
plete the requirement within six quarters. Only the Dean of the Basic College 
may make exceptions to the foregoing. 

Military Science I, first-year military science, consists of one hour of class- 
room instruction and two hours of leadership laboratory (drill) weekly. 

Military Science II, second-year military science, consists of two hours of 
classroom instruction and two hours of leadership laboratory weekly. 

The Basic Course in Military Science is a university course and has noth- 
ing to do with a student's military service obligation. 

The Advanced Course 

The Advanced Course consists of three hours of classroom instruction and 
two hours of leadership laboratory per week during the junior and senior year 
and an advanced ROTC camp of six weeks duration conducted at an Army 
installation during the summer between the junior and senior year. In addi- 
tion each advanced ROTC student is required to complete one four-quarter 
hour course in each of the junior and senior years. The courses will be in the 
following general areas of science: Science Comprehension, General Psychology, 
Effective Communications, Political Institutions, and Political Development. 
The Advanced Course is elective and a student must meet requirements listed 
in subsequent paragraphs to enroll in the course. Students who qualify for ad- 
vanced ROTC are paid by the Federal Government at a rate fixed by the Sec- 
retary of Defense. The present rate is $50.00 per month during the junior and 
senior years, except for the six weeks camp during the summer. The students 
are paid at the rate of $151.95 per month during the advanced camp and are 
paid six cents per mile travel pay from their home or the University, which- 
ever they choose, to the summer camp site and return. 



ix 5 



College of Arts and Sciences 



ENROLLMENT REQUIREMENTS 

Basic Course 

All male freshman students who are citizens of the United States, physi- 
cally qualified, over 14 years of age and less than 24 years of age are required 
to complete the Basic Course of Military Science. Those freshman students who 
have completed 6 months active duty for training with any of the armed forces 
or who have completed MST 1, 2, and 3 of a Junior Division ROTC (3 years 
of high school ROTC) or MS 1 and 2 at any military school's division ROTC 
(military high school) may be excused from the freshman year of the Basic 
Course by producing proper evidence to the Professor of Military Science at 
the beginning of the freshman year. 

All male sophomore students who have completed MS I, NS I, or AS I 
(Freshman Army, Navy, or Air Force ROTC) of any Senior Division ROTC 
unit or were excused from freshman ROTC for reason mentioned in the pre- 
ceding paragraph are required to complete the Basic Course of Military Science 
(Sophomore ROTC). Those sophomore students who have completed MST 3 
and 4 at a military school's division ROTC (military high school) may be ex- 
cused from sophomore ROTC by producing proper evidence to the Professor of 
Military Science. 

Any student who transfers with more than 31 quarter hours credit from 
an institution not having basic ROTC as a requirement for graduation is ex- 
cused from basic ROTC. Any student who transfers with less than 32 quarter 
hours credit from an institution not having basic ROTC as a requirement for 
graduation must complete the Basic Course in ROTC at this institution pro- 
vided he is otherwise qualified. Those students who transfer from institutions 
having required basic ROTC must enroll in the proper course and complete 
the Basic Course regardless of the number of hours transferred unless they 
were properly excused from the Basic Course by the institutions from which 
they transferred. 

Advanced Course 

Any male student who is regularly enrolled as a junior in the University 
and will complete the Advanced Course and will meet other requirements for 
a commission prior to his 28th birthday, and has completed any one of the 
following is eligible to apply for entrance into the Advanced Course: 

1. The basic course of any Senior Division ROTC unit of any of the three 
services (Army, Navy, Air Force). 

2. MST 1, 2, 3, and 4 of a military school's division ROTC unit. 

3. Twelve (12) months of active duty in any of the armed forces, 

4. Six (6) months active duty or active duty for training with any of the 
armed services and second-year ROTC of a Senior Division unit or MST 3 
and 4 of a military school's division ROTC. 

5. Two years at any of the service academies (Army, Navy, Air Force, 
or Coast Guard). 

6. Six weeks basic ROTC camp for junior college transfers. 
Applicants must meet the following requirements before being accepted 

into the advanced program: 

1. Pass a physical examination. 

2. Pass a Department of the Army Qualification Examination (RQ exam). 

3. Have a 2.25 quality point average under the 4.0 system for the first two 
years of college. 

4. Be accepted after interview with Professor of Military Science. 

The RQ Examination and physical examination are administered early in 
the Spring Quarter to students who will be eligible to apply for advanced 
ROTC the following September. These examinations are administered in the 
ROTC Building. Students who are not able to take these examinations at this 
time may get them by appointment through the Administration NCO in the 



x6 



Military Science 



ROTC Building. Representatives from one of the Army Senior Division ROTC 
units will visit the junior college campuses to interview candidates and arrange 
for examination and attendance at the Six Weeks Basic ROTC Camp which 
usually starts in mid-June each year. Students attending the Six Weeks Basic 
Summer Camp will be paid at the rate of $90.60 per month and will receive six 
cents per mile travel expense from their home or school, whichever they 
choose, to the summer camp site and return. 

Advanced Summer Camp 

The six week summer camp is normally attended by students upon com- 
pletion of the third year Military Science. Students are paid six cents per mile 
travel pay from their home or the University, whichever they choose, to the 
summer camp and return. While at camp, each student will receive food, uni- 
forms, medical attention, and pay at the rate prescribed for cadets at the 
United States Military Academy (currently $151.95 per month). 

At camp the students meet young men from many of the best institutions 
in the United States, thus broadening their contacts and gaining opportunity to 
make friendships that may be of great value in later life. In addition to the 
many physical, moral, and mental benefits derived from the healthful camp 
life, there are sufficient recreational facilities provided to make the stay thor- 
oughly enjoyable. 

Commission in the Army of the United States 

Students successfully completing the Advanced Course and the Summer 
Camp are tendered commissions as reserve officers in the Army of the United 
States. 

There are certain stipulations whereby a student who completes the third 
Year Military Science may be designated a "Distinguished Military Student." 
A student so designated who maintains such standards until he graduates will 
be designated a "Distinguished Military Graduate" and will be eligible for 
consideration for appointment in the Regular Army. 

Awards 

Each year the outstanding ROTC cadets in each class are selected on the 
basis of leadership, scholarship, and military aptitude. These cadets so honored 
are awarded medals and their names are engraved on appropriate plaques 
permanently displayed in the Department of Military Science. These plaques 
and medals are donated by local civic and veterans organizations. Additional 
awards for academic and leadership achievements are presented by local busi- 
ness firms, individuals, campus military societies, active and reserve compo- 
nents of the U.S. Army, and the Department of Military Science. 

Military Service Organizations 

ROTC cadets have the opportunity to participate in several special organi- 
zations within the Corps of Cadets. These include the ROTC Band, Company 
F6 of the Pershing Rifles (Drill Team), the ROTC Rifle Team, Scabbard and 
Blade (Honorary Military Society), and the Ranger Group. 

ROTC Flight Training 

Eligibility requirements: At the time of enrollment in the Army Flight 
Training Program, students must either be enrolled in MS IV (Fourth year of 
Senior Division ROTC), or have successfully completed MS IV but not have 
completed the academic requirements for graduation. A student must have a 
sufficiently high academic standing to be recommended by his dean and the 
Professor of Military Science. Flight Training applicants must meet Class I 
standards of medical fitness for flying. 



ix 7 



College of Arts and Sciences 



ROTC TWO-YEAR SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

The Army ROTC Scholarship Program is designed to offer financial assist- 
ance to outstanding young men in the four-year ROTC Program who are in- 
terested in the Army as a career. Each scholarship provides for free tuition, 
textbooks, and laboratory fees, in addition to paying $50.00 per month for the 
period that the scholarship is in effect. 

Selection Procedures: 

Recipients of the Two-year Scholarships will be selected from Military 
Science II students who have submitted applications to the Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and who have been accepted for enrollment in the ROTC Ad- 
vanced Course. Applicants will be screened by the University Scholarship 
Committee. All selections will be forwarded to The Department of the Army 
for approval. 

MILITARY SCIENCE COURSES (MS) 

101, 102, 103— 1st Year Military Science. One hour each. 

Organization of the Army and ROTC, Individual Weapons and Marksman- 
ship, United States Army and National Security, and Leadership Laboratory. 

201, 202, 203— 2nd Year Military Science. One hour each. 

Map and Aerial Photograph Reading, Basic Military Tactics, American 
Military History, and Leadership Laboratory. 

301, 302, 303— 3rd Year Military Science. Three hours each. 

Advanced Military Tactics, Communications, Branches of the Army, Prin- 
ciples of Leadership, Military Teaching Methods, and Leadership Laboratory. 

401, 402, 403— 4th Year Military Science. Three hours each. 

Operations, Logistics, Military Administration, United States In World 
Affairs, Military Law, Service Orientation, and Leadership Laboratory. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
PHYSICS (PHY) AND ASTRONOMY (AST) 

H. C. Dudley, Chairman 
Franks, Kiess, Rathbun, St. Clair 
The primary objectives of the Physics Department are to provide students 
with sufficient basic information and technical skills in the various areas of 
physics so that they may be qualified to: 

(a) Serve as teachers in secondary schools. A physics major for this group 
will include PHY 101, 102, 103 or PHY 201, 202 ; . 203; PHY 371, 381, 481, plus 12 
hours of any other physics course having laboratory. (Total 39 hours.) 

(b) Serve as junior physicists in government or industry. Physics majors 
for this group will include PHY 101, 102, 103 or PHY 201, 202, 203; PHY 371, 
381, 481 plus 24 hours of any other physics courses having laboratory. (Total 
51 hours.) A minor in mathematics and/or computer science is required. Two 
years of German plus English 332 are recommended. 

(c) Pursue professional work and graduate study in Physics. It is the 
intent of the Physics Department to meet the recommendations of the American 
Institute of Physics — National Science Foundation Committee on Curriculum 
for Undergraduate Physics Majors. Fifty-one hours of Physics .cannot meet 
this requirement. For that reason any student planning to do graduate work in 
Physics should consult the Department about additional undergraduate credits; 
60 hours of undergraduate physics preparation are required. 

NOTE: Astronomy 301, 302, 303 do not fulfill the physics courses which 
may be elected in (b) and (c) above. 



1*8 



Physics 



PHYSICS COURSES (PHY) 

101, 102, 103— General Physics. Five hours each. 
Four lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisites: MAT 102. Corequisite for PHY 101 and prerequisite for 
PHY 102. 

A traditional course in general college physics intended for liberal arts and 
pre-medical students. 

Mechanics and Hydrodynamics; Electricity and Magnetism; Light, Heat 
and Sound. May not be taken by any one who has completed calculus except 
by permission of the chairman. 

201, 202, 203— General Physics with Calculus. Five hours each. 

Four lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Corequisite: Calculus. 

Mechanics and Hydrodynamics; Electricity and Magnetism; Light, Heat 
and Sound. 

A more rigorous course in General Physics recommended but not required 
(in preference to PHY 101) for physics majors. This course is required of 
engineering students. 

320 — Electrical Circuit Theory. Four hours. 

Three lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisites: PHY 103 or 203 and Calculus. 

AC and DC Circuit Theory with some applications in electrical measure- 
ments. 

327-328— Electronics. Four hours each. 

Three lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisites: PHY 103 or 203 and Calculus. 

Fundamentals of vacuum and semiconductor devices with applications to 
scientific instrumentation. 

331-332 — Thermodynamics. Four hours each course. 

Three lecture periods and one 3 -hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisites: PHY 103 or 203 and Calculus. 

Temperature, Thermodynamic Systems, Laws of Thermodynamics, Reversi- 
bility and Irreversibility, Carnot Cycle, Entropy and a brief introduction to 
the physics of very low temperatures. 

341 — Geometrical Optics. Four hours. 

Three lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisites: PHY 103 or 203 and Calculus. 

Rays, refractive and reflective surfaces, lens design, stops and optical in- 
struments. 

Fundamentals of wave motion, introduction to Fourier Series, hearing and 
applications to architectural acoustics. 

371 — Atomic Physics. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: PHY 103 or 203 and Calculus. 

Survey of atomic particles, electromagnetic radiation and X-Rays, the 
hydrogen atom, theory of optical spectra and electron distributions within the 
atom. 

381 — Nuclear Physics. Four hours. 

Three lecture periods and one 3- hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: PHY 371. 

Natural radioactivity, fundamental particles, nuclear fission, radioactive 
production of isotopes and new elements. 

392 — Physics Special Problems I, II, III. One hour per quarter. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the chairman. 



1X9 



College of Arts and Sciences 



A course limited to junior and senior physics majors, to work out in the 
laboratory special problems of interest to the student. A formal written report 
will be required, showing extensive library research, and a completed piece 
of functioning apparatus must be constructed. 

421-422— Electricity and Magnetism. Four hours each. 

Three lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisites: PHY 103 or 203, Calculus. 

Vector Analysis, electrostatics, magnetostatics and electromagnetic fields. 

441-442 — Physical Optics. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: PHY 341, Calculus. 

Huygen's Principle, interference, diffraction, polarization and electromag- 
netic theory of light. 

443-G443 — Sound and Ultrasound. Four hours. 

Three lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisites: PHY 103 or PHY 203, PHY 481 or PHY 332. 

A study of sound, and ultrasound, fundamentals of wave motion in a 
finite medium. Fundamentals of hearing, acoustics, and high intensity waves. 

444-G444 — Fundamentals of Solid State Physics. Four hours. 

Three lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: PHY 328. 

Study of the solid as an electromagnetic wave medium, exitation levels, 
and the one electron theory. 

450-G450, 451-G451 — Mechanics (Statics and Dynamics). Four hours each. 

Four lectures per week, each course. 

Prerequisite: PHY 103 or 203, Calculus. 

Mathematical treatment of the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, 
wave motion, and vibration. 

474-G474 — Quantum Mechanics I. Four hours. 

Four lectures per week. 

Schroedinger's wave equations applied to various potentials, simple har- 
monic oscillator and particle in a central field. 

475-G475 — Quantum Mechanics II. Four hours. 

Four lectures per week. 

Solutions of time independent and time dependent perturbated potentials 
and identical particles. The relativistic wave equation and the origin of elec- 
tron spin. 

481-G481— Nuclear Physics. Four hours. 

Three lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: PHY 381. 

Nuclear binding forces, chain reaction, criticality, the non-steady state 
reactor, radiation shielding. 

485-G485, 486-G486— History and Literature of Physics I and II. Four hours 
each. 

Prerequisite: PHY 103 or 203. 

A survey of the literature of physics from the ancients to Einstein; review- 
ing the development of concepts, and the rise and fall of various theories 
which were used to explain observed phenomena. 

A survey of the development of Relativistic theories, and the experimental 
data which now impinges on this school of thought. A study of current sources 
of experimental and research data will be made. 

499 — Undergraduate Research, I, II, III. Two hours per quarter. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the chairman. 

A course limited to selected senior physics majors. To introduce the student 
to methods of physical research, requiring a formal literature search, problem 
outlines, construction of apparatus, and collection of accurate data on some 
assigned problem. A formal report will be required. 



J 3° 



Political Science 



ASTRONOMY COURSES (AST) 

301, 302, 303 — General Astronomy. Four hours each. 

Three lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 
_ Introduction to the coordinate systems of the Earth and Celestial Sphere, 
Time and its applications, The Solar System. 

Astronomical relations of light, atomic theory, spectroscopy; further topics 
on the Solar System, comets and meteorites. 

Astronomical measurements, star classifications, relative and apparent mo- 
tion of the stars, galaxies, extra-solar matter and the stellar energy cycle. 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE (PS) 

Leon A. Wilber, Chairman 
Doumas, Hatcher, Mobley, Parry, Robertson, Tuchak, Weems 

(1) Requirements for an Undergraduate Major. The basic policy of the 
Department is to require (a) the introductory survey course, Political Science 
101, of everyone, (b) one introductory course from each of the four major 
fields of Political Science, and (c) four elective courses. 

The major would therefore include the following courses: 

PS 101 — American Government 

PS 400, 402, or 404— Political Theory 

PS 301, 406, 407, 412, 434, 435, 436, 460, 461, 462, 463, or 464— American Gov- 
ernment. 

PS 450, 451, 452, 453, 470, 472, or 474— Comparative Government. (450 is pre- 
ferred) 

PS 300, 453, 457, 458, 459, or 485— International Relations. 
Electives in Political Science: 16 hours. Total: 36 hours. 

(2) Recommendations for an Undergraduate Minor. The Department rec- 
ommends that the minor include introductory courses from the four fields listed 
for the major. 

(3) Economics 400, Finance 415, and History 405, 411, 469, and 470 may be 
elected as political science if approved by the student's adviser. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES (PS) 

101 — American Government. Four hours. 

A survey of our national government, with some related study of Mis- 
sissippi courts and the state election systems. (Required of all students.) 

300 — United States Foreign Policy. Four hours. 

A study of contemporary U.S. Foreign Policy with major emphasis on the 
period 1945 to the present. The study highlights the revolution in American 
Foreign Policy since World War II. 

301 — State Government. Four hours. 

345 — Current Problems in Citizenship. Four hours. 

A study of current problems before the national, state, and local govern- 
ments at the time the course is taught. Different problems are studied in dif- 
ferent years. 

400 -G40O— Political Theory to 1783. Four hours. 

Political thought from Plato through the Enlightenment, with emphasis on 
the contributions of individual philosophers. 

402- G402— American Political Theory. Four hours. 

A study of the principal political ideas that have influenced the develop- 
ment of the United States' political system. 

404- G404— Political Theory Since 1783. Four hours. 

Recent and contemporary European political thought with emphasis on 
liberalism, conservatism, socialism, communism, and fascism. 



1 3 I 



College of Arts and Sciences 



406-G406 — American Political Parties and Pressure Groups. Four hours. 

407- G407— Mississippi Government. Four hours. 

412-G412— U.S. Constitutional Law. Four hours. 

A survey, by the case method, of principles and practices of American 
constitutional law. Emphasis is placed upon judicial review, the federal system, 
national powers, and individual rights. 

434-G434 — County Government. Four hours. 

435-G435 — Municipal Government. Four hours. 

436-G436 — The Legislative Process. Four hours. 

A detailed study of Congress and the state legislature. 

450-G450 — Governments of West Europe. Four hours. 

A study of France, West Germany, and Italy. Recommended as the first 
course in comparative government. 

451-G451 — Soviet Government and Politics. Four hours. 

A detailed study of the political, economic, and social structure of the 
Soviet Union, and the role of the Communist Party. 

452-G452 — British Government. Four hours. 

453-G453 — Soviet Foreign Policy. Four hours. 
Emphasis is on the period after World War II. 

457-G457 — International Politics. Four hours. 

458-G458 — International Organization. Four hours. 

A study of the principal types of international organization, and of exam- 
ples of the same, such as the United Nations and the Organization of American 
States. 

459-G459 — Propaganda in Foreign Policy. Four hours. 

A study of the media and techniques of propaganda, and of propaganda as 
an instrument of foreign policy. U.S. programs, both governmental and non- 
governmental, are examined and compared with those of other appropriate 
countries. 

460-G460 — Public Administration. Four hours. 

An introductory study including organization, personnel management, and 
fiscal management. 

461-G461— The Presidency. Four hours. 

A study of the executive function in the process of government with spe- 
cial emphasis on the increasing role of the President. 

462-G462 — Public Personnel Administration. Four hours. 
Includes recruitment, promotion, discipline, control and removal in both 
U.S. and the states. 

463-G463 — Organization and Management. Four hours. 

Includes organization planning, program planning, fiscal planning, and 
administrative reporting. 

464-G464 — Policy Formulation. Four hours. 

Includes the roles of persons, groups, and governmental and non-govern- 
mental institutions. 

470-G470— Middle East: Government and Politics. Four hours. 

A study of the states of the contemporary Middle East: governmental 
structures and institutions, political organizations and behavior, and regional 
and international relations. 

472-G472— Far East: Governments and Politics. Four hours. 

A survey of the politics and the governmental systems of the area in gen- 
eral, and of such as India, China, Taiwan, Japan, Ceylon, and the Philippines 
in particular. 



131 



Religion and Philosophy 



474 -G474— Governments and Politics of Tropical Africa. Four hours. 

A survey of the political systems of the "emerging" states and their poli- 
tics, with special emphasis on industrialization and socio -cultural background. 

485-G485 — International Law. Four hours. 

A sampling of the field, based largely on cases. 

492— Special Problems I, II, III. One hour each. 

A problem study to be approved by the Department Chairman. The stu- 
dent will prepare a scholarly paper under the supervision of a professor. 

DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION (REL) AND 
PHILOSOPHY (PHI) 

John F. Nau, Chairman 
Clayton, Parsons, Sullivan, Wood 

The Department of Religion and Philosophy offers programs of study which 
will allow a student to choose either a major or a minor in Philosophy or a 
major and a minor in Religion and Philosophy combined. 

Students majoring or minoring in Philosophy should begin with either 
Philosophy 101 or Logic 210. For a major, a total of 36 quarter hours is re- 
quired, of which at least 16 hours should be in courses on the 400 level. A 
major program in Philosophy will normally include Philosophy 101, Logic 210, 
and Philosophy 203, 205, 207. 

For a minor in Philosophy, a total of 28 quarter hours is required, of which 
at least eight quarter hours should be in courses on the 400 level. 

PHILOSOPHY COURSES (PHI) 

101 — Introduction to Philosophy. Four hours. 

A course intended to acquaint the student with the general nature of phi- 
losophical study. Covers values, methods, themes, the nature of reality, episte- 
mology, ethics, and aesthetics. 

203 — History of Philosophy. Four hours. 

A study of the main philosophic movements, and of the findings of Greek 
pioneers, the patristic writers, and the scholastics. 

205 — History of Philosophy. Four hours. 

A study of the main problems and movements in philosophy from the 
Renaissance to Kant. 

207 — History of Philosophy. Four hours 

Philosophy after Kant. Writings of Hegel, Schopenhauer, Mill, Compte, 
Marx, Nietzsche, Bergson, Dewey, Whitehead, and Russell will be considered. 

210 — Logic. Four hours. 

A study of the methods and problems of accurate and critical thinking. 
Induction, deduction, the syllogism, fallacies, the scientific method, and sym- 
bolic logic. Emphasis on practical application. 

220 — Introduction to Symbolic Logic. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Eight hours of mathematics or PHI 210. 

The basic theory and operations of the sentential calculus, qualification, 
and the logic of relations. 

300 — Philosophical Systems. Four hours. 

This course 'off ers more thorough study of the recent developments in phi- 
losophical systems, emphasizing particularly creationism, emergentism, organ- 
ism, existentialism, and pragmatism. Emphasis on supplementary readings in 
these fields. Not open to freshmen and sophomores. 

310— Theories of Reality. Four hours. 

An examination of some principal philosophical questions concerning 
identity and diversity, causality, freedom, necessity, God, and of various re- 
sponses made to these questions by members of both the metaphysical and 
anti-metaphysical traditions. 



*33 



College of Arts and Sciences 



315 — Semantics. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: 8 hours of philosophy including PHI 210. 

Study in the foundations of language theory and the general theory of 
signs. Applications will be made to the languages of science, metaphysics, and 
the arts. 

320 — Theories of Knowledge. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: PHI 101. 

An examination of recent philosophical positions in epistemology, ^including 
positivism, pragmatism, realism, and ordinary language analysis. 

330 — Continental Rationalism. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Eight hours of philosophy or permission of instructor. 

A study of the philosophies of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibnitz. Based on 
selections from their writings. 

340 — British Empirical Philosophy. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of philosophy or permission of instructor. 

The British empiricists examined both individually and as contributors to 
one of modern philosophy's "historical developments. 

350 — Foundations of Existentialism. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Eight hours of philosophy or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the basic motifs of existentialist thought through the 
writings of Kierkegaard, Sartre, Nietzsche, and Berdyaev. 

370— Ethics. Four hours. 

A study of the evolution of moral ideas from primitive to modern times, 
and a critical analysis of ethical theories and of social institutions such as the 
state, property, and the family. 

372 — Philosophy of Religion. Four hours. 

A detailed examination of the proofs for the existence of a diety and a 
study of the problems of philosophical theology, such as transcendence and 
immanence, free will, mysticism, and good and evil. 

412-G412— Philosophy of Politics. Four hours. 

A study of fundamental political concepts including law, government, sov- 
ereignty and state, and the relation of man's understanding of his own nature 
to the structuring of such concepts. 

415-G415— Kant. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of philosophy. 

Textual study of Kant's metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical theories. 
Attention given to the influence of the Critical Philosophy upon subsequent 
philosophical movements. 

420-G420 — Introduction to Philosophy of Science. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Eight hours of philosophy or advanced courses in mathematics 
or the empirical sciences. 

A study of the conditions and status of knowledge, perception, measure- 
ment, hypothesis, causality, and concept formation based upon recent scientific 
and philosophical investigation. 

430- G430— Advanced Ethics. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: PHI 370. 

A study of rival contemporary theories in general theory of value and 
ethics. The positions of naturalism, intuitionism, emotivism, and functionalism 
will be critically compared. 

440 -G440— Whitehead. Four hours. 

A study of Whitehead's theory of reality, philosophy, man, and civilization. 
Readings from Process and Reality, Science and the Modern World, and other 
works. 

448-G448— The Pre-Socratics. Four hours. 



134 






Religion and Philosophy 



A study of the major schools and problems of the pre-socratic philosophers 
from Thales to the atomists. Consideration will be given to the intrinsic im- 
portance of the contributions of these philosophers to perennial problems 
in metaphysics and epistemology as well as to the influence of these contribu- 
tions on the philosophies of Plato and Aristotle. 

452-G452— Plato. Four hours. 

A textual study of the major Platonic dialogues. 

460-G460 — Analytic Philosophy. Four hours. 

A study of the historical background and development of the contemporary 
linguistic approach to philosophical problems based upon the writings of Witt- 
genstein, Wisdom, Ryle, and Austin. 

462- G462— Phenomenology. Four hours. &&>&£*■ , 

Textual study of the philosophy of Edmund Husserl, the founder of pheno- 
menology. Topics such as philosophy as rigorous science, intentionality, and the 
phenomenological reduction will be given special attention. 

464-G464 — Problems in the Philosophy of Language. Four hours.* 
Advanced study in various philosophical theories of language. Considera- 
tion will be given to such special topics as the theory of descriptions, synony- 
mity, analyticity, vagueness, reference, and generality. 

RELIGION 

Students majoring in Religion and Philosophy combined are required to 
have a total of 36 hours of which no less than 12 quarter hours must be in 
either Philosophy or Religion. Students minoring in Religion and Philosophy 
combined are required to have a total of 28 quarter hours of which no less 
than 8 quarter hours must be in either Religion or Philosophy. 

RELIGION COURSES (REL) 

104 — The Life of Jesus. Four hours. 

A study of the life of Jesus as presented in the first three gospels, with 
attention to the historical and religious background of Jesus' ministry 

)202 — The Old and New Testaments. Four hours each. 

inr rn l m i rvry, eevewaag tyi f 1; 1 rattn \ vr\ A gesaeaal "^ite"* of thg 

the Old and New T estemeirter /&^w>6, //.77 Zo%* & 
205 — History of Non- Christian Religions. Four hours. 
May be elected as history. 

A study of the grounds for religious beliefs of men, the emergence of tribal 
and national religions in antiquity, and a survey of the principal non-Christian 
faiths of ancient and modern times. 

250 — Biblical Archaeology. Four hours 

Archaeological discoveries and their contribution to the understanding of 
the Bible. Attention is given to the archaeological method. Primary focus is 
upon Palestinian archaeology, also backgrounds of the Old Testament creation 
story and flood story, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. 

301, 302 — The Major and Minor Prophets of Israel. Two hours each. 

A study of the lives and teachings of the Old Testament prophets, the 
social, political, economic, and religious backgrounds to their work and the 
relevance of their message to modern times. 

305— The Gospels. Four hours. 

A study of the biography of Jesus and literary problems of the synoptic 
Gospels approached through intensive work on Mark, with materials integrated 
from the Gospel of John. 




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*35 






College of Arts and Sciences 




faj 



G401 — History of Christian Culture. Four hours, 
be elected as history. 
A study of the cultural development of Western Europe during the 
hristian era, with emphasis on religious thought, and on religious aspects of 
titutions, literature, and art. 

402-G402 — Religion in the Rise of American Culture. Four hours. 
A study of the origin and development of the major religious groups and 
r of the shifts in religious thought in the United States from colonial times to 
if 67 the present. 

p**' 405-G405 — The Types of Literature in the Bible. Four hours. 

W J s May be elected as English 346. 

An analysis of the types of literature in the Old and New Testaments and 
a comparison of these with similar writings of other Jewish writers of the same 
periods and with related types of writing among other people. 

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE EDUCATION (SCE) 

Including Fundamentals of Science (FS) 

A. G. Morgan, Chairman 

F. Brown, Frazier, Mauldin, Swann 

The Department of Science Education is operated jointly by the College of 
Arts and Sciences and the School of Education and Psychology. The facilities 
are in the College of Arts and Sciences. Programs in teacher education are in 
the School of Education and Psychology. Responsibility for the curriculum is 
shared jointly. Graduate programs are described in the Graduate Bulletin. 

Objectives 

The objectives of the Department of Science Education are: (1) to provide 
those courses in both the physical and biological sciences which would give a 
minimum degree of scientific literacy to all students; (2) to provide, in coopera- 
tion with the Department of Elementary Education, a curriculum in the sciences 
» and science methods for elementary school teachers; (3) to provide advisement 
for those students planning to teach the sciences at the secondary school level; 
(4) to provide programs leading to advanced degrees in science education; (5) 
to work with public schools in the development of curricula, workshops, science 
fairs, and other activities designed to improve science instruction at all public 
school levels. 

Curriculum and Program 

The Department of Science Education is concerned primarily with teachers 
and prospective teachers of science. Although some students will be planning 
to teach a specific science, current public school organization does not encour- 
age too much specialization: familiarity with principles and concepts common 
to all of the several scientific disciplines is prerequisite. Hence, courses in Sci- 
ence Education are so organized as to give teachers and prospective teachers a 
broad understanding of several of the sciences, with the opportunity for enough 
specialization in one area to pursue advanced study. 

In general, all prospective science teachers will study mathematics through 
trigonometry. Calculus is prerequisite for some courses in chemistry and physics. 
Specialization in one scientific discipline will require a minimum of forty (40) 
quarter credit hours in that discipline. Certain courses offered by the various 
science departments specifically for public school teachers are applicable only 
to the degree programs in education offered by the School of Education and 
Psychology. 

The Department of Science Education offers a major in general science for 
secondary school teachers, grades 7 through 12. The recommended course of 
study is outlined below: 



36 



Science Education 



Freshman Year: 

ENG 101, 102, 103 

MAT 101, 102, 103 

CHE 101, 102, 103 

GHY 103 

PS 101 

MUS or ART 



Junior Year: 

PA 101 

FED 300 (education) 

EPY 319, 332 (psychology) 

FED 469 (education) 

CHE 301, 302, 303 

BIO 104 or 311, 300 

GLY 101, 260 



Sophomore Year: 

BIO 101, 102, 103 

ENG 201, 433 

HIS 101, 102 

SOC 103 

PHY 101, 102, 103 

HTH 179 

PSY 201 

Senior Year: 

SED 451, 313, 481 (education) 
Electives 20 hours in biology, 

chemistry, geology, or physics 
Electives 8 hours 



The above program provides a broad background and some depth in all sci- 
ence areas, opportunity for considerable depth and specialization in one science 
area, and background in professional education necessary for effective teaching. 

Because of the nature of the teacher training program, a minor in general 
science is not offered by the Department. Students in the College of Arts and 
Sciences should discuss minors in the sciences with their major adviser and/or 
the particular science department chairman. Students in the School of Educa- 
tion and Psychology can major in Science Education and minor in Secondary 
Education. An adequate minor in general science is not possible. The program 
as outlined above for science teachers meets certification standards in all states 
in the areas of biology, chemistry, physics, earth sciences, general science, and 
physical science; and, in most cases, it satisfies requirements for certification 
in combined areas, i.e., biology, chemistry, and general science, or chemistry, 
physics, and general science. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION COURSES (SCE) 
Including Fundamentals of Science (FS) 

Fundamentals of Science: A sequence of two courses in the physical sciences 
and two in the biological sciences. Each course carries four hours of credit and 
consists of four one-hour lecture-demonstration sessions per week. A working 
knowledge of algebra is presupposed. These courses are designed to give stu- 
dents an acquaintance and understanding of certain fundamental principles 
and laws of the major science disciplines. Credit in these courses will not count 
toward the degree requirements for a major or minor in the sciences or in sec- 
ondary school science teaching. 

In as much as there is overlapping and duplication in these courses and 
those offered by various science departments, the student should read carefully 
the prerequisites and limitations for each of the FS courses. Any questions 
should be answered by the student's adviser and/or the Department of Science 
Education prior to enrolling in these courses . 

FS 104 — Physical Science I. Four hours. 

A student who has credit for two quarters or one semester of physics can- 
not receive credit for this course. 

A study of matter and energy in the universe; their sources, transformation, 
and interactions; the forces acting within the universe; and the laws governing 
these phenomena. 

FS 105 — Physical Science II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: FS 104, or one semester or two quarters of physics. 



137 



College of Arts and Sciences 



A student who has credit for one semetser or two quarters of chemistry 
and/or physical or historical geology cannot receive credit for this course. 

A continuation of FS 104. Primary emphasis is on elementary and compound 
substances, the arrangement of and forces acting on these substances in the 
formation of the earth, atmosphere, and the universe. 

FS 106 — Biological Science I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: FS 105, or one semester or two quarters of chemistry. 
A student who has credit in Biology 101 and 102, one semester of biology, 
or freshman biology cannot receive credit for this course. 

Elementary studies of cell structure and function; gametogenesis, ontogeny, 
heredity, ecology, taxonomy, and phylogeny, with emphasis on the major groups 
of animals. 

FS 107 — Biological Science II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: FS 105, or one semester or two quarters of chemistry. 
A student who has credit in Botany 104 or other botany courses cannot 
receive credit for this course. 

Elementary studies of plant morphology, physiology, ecology, taxonomy, 
and phylogeny, with emphasis on the major groups of plants. 

SCE 400-G400— BSCS Biology for Secondary Teachers. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: 36 hours of biology. 

This course is for teachers only, and may not be used for credit toward a 
major in biology. 

A detailed critical examination of the subject matter, techniques, and meth- 
ods for teaching biology in secondary schools, as proposed by the Biological Sci- 
ences Curriculum Study. Designed to orient teachers in modern biology subject 
matter and special techniques by presenting background material and special 
laboratory exercises. Emphasis is placed on the laboratory as the source of in- 
formation from which sound conclusions can be drawn. 

SCE 401-G401^CHEM Chemistry for Secondary Teachers— Methods and 
Techniques. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: Thirty-six hours of chemistry including analytical chemistry 
or consent of instructor. 

A course designed to familiarize chemistry teachers with the materials, 
methods, and techniques of teaching chemistry developed by the Chemical 
Education Materials Study Committee. Unifying principles of chemistry are 
emphasized, with laboratory work providing the basis of development. 

SCE 432 — Science for Elementary Teachers. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: FS 104, 105, 106, 107, or 8 quarter hours in physical science 
and 8 quarter hours in biological science. 

Six hours of lecture, audio-visual, and laboratory work per week. 

Designed to relate basic scientific principles to the elementary grades, and 
provide experience in presenting these principles to the elementary school child 
through the use of a variety of materials, activities, and methods. Required of 
and designed for elementary education majors only. 

SCE 447— Nature Study and Elementary Science. Four hours. 

Six hours of lecture and field work per week. 

Familiarizes prospective teachers with the biological and physical materials 
commonly close at hand and assists in the identification and utilization of these 
materials. Considers the whole environment of the child and his observation and 
interpretation of it. May be taken as elective credit for elementary education 
majors. 



x 3 8 



Sociology 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY (SOC) 

John N. Burrus, Chairman 
Allen, Blackmon, Hopper 

The Department of Sociology offers a major and a minor. Provision is also 
made for the student who is not a major or minor but who wishes to select one 
or several courses in Sociology according to his interests or needs. 

Core curricula applicable to the College of Arts and Sciences and the degree 
selected should be followed with care. Sociology majors who wish to meet re- 
quirements for a teacher's license should take note of these requirements in the 
section of the catalog dealing with teacher training. 

A minimum of 36 quarter hours (beyond SOC 103) is required for a major 
in Sociology. Twenty -eight hours are required for a minor. 

The sociology major will complete a minor of 28 hours in another field. It 
is possible for the minor to be taken in any department offering a major, but in 
most circumstances a minor in one of the social sciences is most advantageous. 
The core requirements should be completed as early in the academic program 
as possible. Courses not needed to fulfill major, minor, or core requirements are 
free electives and may be taken in any department of the University. 

Freshmen and sophomores planning to major in Sociology are advised to 
include some sociology courses in their schedules. This will preclude the neces- 
sity of scheduling multiple courses during the junior and senior years. Such 
courses should not interfere with the completion of core requirements, however. 

Transfer students interested in majoring in Sociology are advised to check 
their programs with the sociology adviser at as early a date as possible. 

Course Requirements and Information 

A. All sociology majors must take the following courses: SOC 201, 301, 481 or 
482 and 485. 

B. Students taking the general sociology major must also take SOC 401 and 
complete the 481-482 sequence. The remaining 12 hours may be selected 
from any of the departmental offerings with the exception of 230 and 330. 

C. Students preparing for careers in professional social work may use Sociology 
as a major or minor in a program of pre-professional undergraduate train- 
ing. While the University does not offer a degree or major in Social Work, 
proper planning of the undergraduate program will provide an adequate 
academic background for those who wish to pursue a career in that field. 
Professional training must be obtained in a graduate school of social work, 
but the student is urged to obtain a well-balanced undergraduate education 
with courses representing all academic areas. Proficiency in English, mathe- 
matics, and social sciences is particularly desirable. 

The pre-professional student pursuing a major program in Sociology must 
fulfill the requirements in "A" above and then may select 16-24 additional hours 
in Sociology from other departmental offerings. Some recommended courses 
are: SOC 209, 230, 304, 330, 429, 450, and 470. The selection of courses should be 
made in consultation with the sociology adviser. 

SOCIOLOGY COURSES (SOC) 

Note: All 400-level courses are open only to students of junior standing or 
higher. 

103— Introduction to Sociology. Four hours. 

A course designed to give the student a general overview of the content 
and methodology of sociology. Prerequisite to all courses except 201. 

201— Rural Sociology.. Four hours. 

A study of the structure, institutions, and social processes of rural society; 
and of the effect of urbanization on rural society. Recommended for majors and 
minors. 



*39 



College of Arts and Sciences 



209 — Cultural Anthropology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SOC 103. 

A study of human behavior in preliterate societies. Attention to how cul- 
tural traits are invented and diffused; and to the relation of cultural change to 
modern civilization. Emphasis on the American Indian. 

230 — Introduction to Social Work. Four hours. 

An introduction to the purpose, methods, and philosophy of contemporary 
social work. Intended only for persons planning to enter social work as a voca- 
tion. 

233 — Social Problems. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: SOC 103 or 201. 

A study of representative contemporary problems, with emphasis on causes 
which arise from cultural patterns and social change. 

280 — Criminology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SOC 103. 

A study of causes, treatment and prevention of crime. The presentation 
deals with criminology, penology, and criminal legislation in ancient and modern 
times. 

301 — Urban Sociology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SOC 103 or 201. 

An analysis of the nature of urban society and the factors shaping it, in- 
cluding the influence of urban ecology, and ecological processes. Consideration 
is given to the impact of urbanization and industrialization on social institutions, 
levels of living, and demography. 

304— The Family. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SOC 103. 

An analysis of the structure and function of the family as an institution. 
Some emphasis on contemporary trends and factors shaping the contemporary 
family. 

309 — Anthropology Survey I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in sociology or anthropology. 

The basic course for the serious or pre-professional anthropology student. 
Lecture and supervised research. 

330— Methods of Social Work. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: SOC 103 and 230. 

A study of the principles of social case work. 

336 — Educational Sociology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SOC 103, or eight hours in education, or consent of the 
instructor. 

A comprehensive study of the educational institution; an analysis of the 
school as a social institution; and the relationship of the educational institution 
to the community and general society. 

340 — Advanced Rural Sociology. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: SOC 201 or 103 and advanced standing. 

An advanced course in rural sociology. Certain areas of rural life and social 
change are selected for detailed study. The effects of urbanization, mechaniza - 
tion, and migration are examined. Recommended as complementary to Sociology 
301. 

Courses in the 400 series may be taken for graduate credit. 

401-G401 — Population. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: SOC 103. 



140 



Speech and Hearing Sciences 



This course introduces the student to the science of demography and ex- 
amines differentials and trends in birth rates, migration, sex ratios, and mor- 
tality rates. Recommended for all majors and minors. Advanced standing re- 
quired. 

420- G420— Industrial Sociology. Four hours. 

An advanced sociological study of industrial and business units as social 
systems, and their institutional setting. 

429-G429 — Juvenile Delinquency. Four hours. 

A study of causes and the nature of juvenile delinquency, the development 
of the juvenile court, probation and other rehabilitative programs. Recom- 
mended for persons with a serious interest in the study of delinquency. Not open 
to freshmen and sophomores. 

430-G430 — Social Foundations of Personality. Four hours. 

A comprehensive treatment of the role of the social group and the cultural 
heritage in the development and functioning of the human personality. An analy- 
sis of social institutions, social organizations and social experience as they are 
related to personality development. Advanced standing required. 

450-G450 — Social Institutions. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: SOC 103 and advanced standing. 

A detailed study of major American social institutions, their functions, in- 
terrelationships, and significant trends. Emphasis on theory of social structure. 

470-G470 — Advanced General Sociology. Four hours. 

An advanced course in general sociology giving expanded treatment to the 
basic sociological concepts and subject-matter areas. Not open to freshmen and 
sophomores. 

481 -G481— History of Social Thought. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: SOC 103 and advanced standing. 

An examination of early social thought, tracing the development of western 
thought and ideas from Hammurabi to Comte. 

482-G482— Sociological Theory. Four hours. 

A survey of the growth and development of sociological theory from Comte 
to the present. Advanced standing required. 

485-G485— Methods of Social Research. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: 12 hours in Sociology. 

A survey of elementary research techniques, illustrated by demonstrations 
and projects. How to locate, process, analyze, and interpret social research data. 
Open only to juniors and seniors; required for majors. 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCES (SHS) 

Robert Peters, Chairman 
Davis, DuBard, Giles, Hudson, Mahaffey, Webb 

The Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences is concerned with the 
body of knowledge and scientific study that pertains to both normal and abnormal 
speech, hearing, and language. The Department provides the environment in 
which information in this area can be effectively advanced and knowledge dis- 
seminated. 

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Science teaching 
degrees are offered by the Department. For information concerning Master's or 
doctoral degrees, consult the Graduate Bulletin. Specialization is possible in 
four principal areas: (1) Speech and Hearing Science; (2) Audiology; (3) Lan- 
guage Disorders; (4) Speech Pathology. 

Majors who take the B.S. teaching degree may minor in Special Education. 
The minor will require EPY 316, EPY 319, EPY 332, EED 266, SPE 451, SPE 486, 
SPE 471 (a minimum of 12 hours must be taken in SPE 471). 



141 



College of Arts and Sciences 



The Speech and Hearing Center, the School for Deaf and Aphasic Children, 
and the Acoustic Laboratory are operated by the Department on the campus 
to provide clinical and research laboratory experiences. Other training facilities 
are available at off campus locations. 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI SPEECH 
AND HEARING CENTER 

Southern Station, Box 92 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 
Phone:266-7221 

The Speech and Hearing Center is operated by the Department of Speech 
and Hearing Sciences as a laboratory training unit and as a service center for 
students and other individuals who have speech, hearing, or language impair- 
ments. Diagnostic, therapeutic, and teaching services are provided for a wide 
variety of disorders, including delayed speech, defective articulation, stuttering, 
cleft palate, cerebral palsy, language disorders, laryngectomees, and hearing 
losses of any type. Included in the services offered to the hard of hearing are 
hearing-aid evaluations, lip reading, auditory training, hearing aid orientation, 
audiological assessment for compensation and medical-legal claims, and any 
type of pure -tone and speech audiometry. 

The School for the Deaf and Aphasic Children, Miss Etoile DuBard, Director, 
is a part of the over -all speech and hearing services and is specifically concerned 
with diagnostics and teaching of children with hearing and language disorders. 

The services are available at nominal costs. 
Speech and Hearing Center Services: 

Audiometric Pure Tone Test $ 5.00 

Diagnostic Hearing Evaluation 10.00 

Hearing Aid Evaluation 15.00 

Hearing Evaluation for Medical-Legal Compensation Claims 25.00 

Diagnostic Speech Evaluation 10.00 

Speech or Hearing Therapy fees per session 2.00 

Therapy fees for college students per quarter 5.00 

SPEECH AND HEARING COURSES (SHS) 
SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCE 

201 — Introduction to Phonetics. Four hours. 

International Phonetic Alphabet as applied to English. 

210 — Fundamentals of Speech and Hearing Science. Four hours. 

An introduction to the basic knowledge pertaining to speech, hearing, and 
language processes. 

332 — Semantics. Four hours. 

Scientific approach to the study of language as a symbolic code. 

336 — Experimental Phonetics. Four hours. 

A study of laboratory investigations of problems in phonetics as they are 
related to functional speech. 

338 — Psychology of Speech. Four hours. 

Study of Speech with particular reference to information theory, speech 
intelligibility, and other mathematical model systems. 

402-G402 — Language Development, Four hours. 

The normal acquisition of language. 

406-G406 — Acoustic Phonetics. Four hours. 

Principles of acoustic theories of speech production. 

410-G410— Anatomy, Physiology, and Mechanism of Hearing. Four hours. 

This is a basic and fundamental audiology course open to all students who 
are interested in the normal anatomy and physiology of the ear and associated 
areas. 



14* 



Speech and Hearing Sciences 



443-G443 — Voice Science I. Four hours. 

444-G444 — Voice Science II. Four hours. 

A two -course sequence dealing with the various anatomical and neuro- 
logical systems concerned with the production of speech. 

492 — Problems in Speech and Hearing Science, Audiology, Language Dis- 
orders, or Speech Pathology. One to six hours. 

AUDIOLOGY 

302 — Introduction to the Measurement of Hearing. Four hours. 

A specialized survey of the field of audiology to acquaint students with the 
causes, testing, and rehabilitation of persons with hearing loss. 

401-G401 — Auditory Training and Hearing Aids, Four hours. 

Current methods of using amplifications for rehabilitating persons with 
hearing loss. 

405-G405 — Clinical Audiology. Four hours. 

Advanced audiometric techniques and clinical procedures. 

409-G409— Speech Reading. Four hours. 

Major theoretical and applied aspects of the speech reading (lipreading) 
process. 

413-G413 — Pre-School Hard of Hearing and Deaf. Four hours. 

An over-all view of the complex problems facing the hard-of -hearing and 
deaf child in the home, community, and educational environment. 

417-G417 — Audiological Instrumentation. Four hours. 

To present advanced students various electronic systems employed in the 
study of audiology. 

425-G425 — Pathologies of the Hearing Mechanism. Four hours. 

A basic and fundamental course in audiology open to students interested 
in the various pathologies and abnormal functions of the ear and associated 
areas. 

440-G440 — Medical Diagnosis and Treatment of Speech and Hearing Path- 
ologies I. Two hours. 

441-G441 — Medical Diagnosis and Treatment of Speech and Hearing Path- 
ologies II. Two hours. 

442 -G442— Medical Diagnosis and Treatment of Speech and Hearing Path- 
ologies in. Two hours. 

A three -course sequence dealing with the diagnosis and the medical and 
surgical treatment of speech and hearing pathologies. 

LANGUAGE DISORDERS 

430-G430— Phonetics for the Acoustically Handicapped. Four hours. 

Techniques for teaching speech to the deaf and those children with unusual 
hearing problems, including systems of orthography and their application for 
teaching speech and reading to acoustically handicapped children. 

431-G431 — Language Disorders I: Assessment of Children with Language 
Disorders. Four hours. 

Problems of assessing children with language disorders, differentiating the 
aphasic child from the deaf, mentally retarded, autistic, severely emotionally 
disturbed, or the child who does not develop speech and language because of 
muscular paralysis. 



143 



College of Arts and Sciences 



432 -G432— Language Disorders II: Habitation of the Aphasic Child. Four 
hours. 

Prerequisites: SHS 430, 431. 

Basic problems of the aphasic child and procedures needed for him to 
acquire use and comprehension of language and speech. 

433-G433 — Language for the Hard-of-Hearing and Deaf. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: SHS 413 or the consent of the instructor. 

Principles of language development for the pre-school and school age 
hard- of -hearing and deaf child and the child with multiple handicaps. 

434-G434 — Speech for the Hard-of-Hearing and Deaf. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: SHS 430. 

Problems in developing and maintaining intelligible speech in hard-of- 
hearing and deaf children through the multisensory approach. Attention is 
given to the speech problems of children with multiple handicaps. 

435-G435 — Problems in Reading for the Hard-of-Hearing and Deaf. Four 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

Problems confronting the deaf in reading. Special attention is given to 
problems created by the vocabulary of high level abstraction and words of 
multiple meanings. 

436-G436 — Problems in Academic Subjects for the Hard-of-Hearing and 
Deaf. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

Problems of vocabulary and language of specific subject matter areas. 

437-G437 — History, Education, and Guidance for the Deaf. Four hours. 

SPEECH PATHOLOGY 

301-G301 — Introduction to Speech Pathology. Four hours. 
404-G404 — Stuttering and Related Problems. Four hours. 
Theories and therapeutic procedures evaluated with respect to the problem 
of stuttering behavior in children and adults. 

414-G414 — Diagnostic Procedures in Speech Pathology. Four hours. 
Examination and diagnosis of people with speech disorders with emphasis 
on interviewing, testing, and report writing. 

416-G416 — Articulation Disorders. Four hours. 

Study of the problems of defective articulation: definition, causative fac- 
tors, therapy, and research. 

420-G420 — Voice Disorders. Four hours. 
The disorders of voice and their cause and management. 
424-G424 — Organic Speech Problems. Four hours. 

The pathologies and therapies for speech and allied language problems 
associated with the organic disorders of cerebral palsy and cleft palate. 

428-G428— Adult Aphasia and Related Problems. Four hours. 
The speech and related problems associated with neurological impairment. 
438-G438 — Pathology of Speech Mechanism. Four hours. 
Investigation of the various disorders involving the vocal mechanism which 
can result in and/or be associated with speech problems. 



144 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Joseph A. Greene, Jr., Dean 

PURPOSE 

The School of Business Administration has as its objective the education of a 
student through a blend of cultural knowledge, economic literacy, basic busi- 
ness tools, and specialized knowledge to allow him to rise in the business world 
to the maximum of his innate abilities. Specialized courses in various fields to 
suit different objectives are superimposed upon a broad coverage of courses in 
the arts and sciences, mathematics, economics, and general business. Thus, it is 
believed that the graduate has been given enough specialized training to enable 
him to start work in one of the functional areas of business, and a broad enough 
education with the ability to use managerial tools and exercise business judg- 
ment to rise to the executive levels. 

ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION 

For efficient operation the School of Business Administration is organized 
into the departments of Accounting, Economics, Finance, Management, and 
Marketing. Each department offers at least one major and a student interested 
in a particular area should examine any alternative majors or course emphases 
offered by that department. 

Whatever major is chosen the student pursues the same curriculum except 
for his major course requirements. Upon completion of all requirements he is 
awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

The Department of Economics offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in the 
College of Arts and Sciences as well as the Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration. The curriculum for the Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics 
is found under the section of the catalog devoted to the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

STUDENT ADMITTANCE AND ADVISEMENT 

A student is eligible for admission to the School of Business Administration 
when he will have completed by the end of the current quarter as many as 90 
quarter hours with a "C" average. For admittance without reservation he must 
have completed or be completing all the requirements under the curriculum 
prescribed for the freshman and sophomore years. A student is admitted with 
some qualifications if he has the required hours but lacks some of his basic core. 
It is imperative that the student will have completed, or will shortly complete, 
the School requirements in accounting principles, economics principles, and 
mathematics. A student will not be admitted under any circumstances until he 
has completed freshman English composition. 

Upon his admission to the School, the student is assigned an adviser within 
the School by the Office of the Dean. His adviser will be his department chairman 
or someone designated by the department chairman who will approve his 
schedule each quarter, provide counsel, and sign his application for degree. 

A student who changes his major within the School must come to the Office 
of the Dean and change his departmental designation and his adviser. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS, PLACEMENT, AND ASSISTANCE 

The School promotes several professional and honorary societies for stu- 
dents in order to foster fellowship and scholarship among those with similar 
interests. These organizations are: Alpha Epsilon Alpha, professional fraternity 
in accounting; Economics Society, professional fraternity in economics; Delta 
Sigma Pi, professional fraternity for men in all areas of business; Omicron Delta 
Epsilon, honorary society in economics; Phi Chi Theta, professional fraternity 
for women in all areas of business; Pi Sigma Epsilon, professional fraternity in 
marketing; Rho Epsilon, professional fraternity in real estate; and, Society for 
Advancement of Management, professional fraternity in management. 

All these organizations are coordinated under the Business Fraternity Coun- 
cil of the School. 



145 



School of Business Administration 



The School cooperates with the University Placement Bureau in assisting 
its graduates in finding positions. The student is expected to establish a file with 
the Placement Bureau three quarters before graduation in order to avail him- 
self of all the opportunities. 

There are several scholarships available exclusively for students in the 
School of Business Administration as well as many others for which business 
students may apply. Any inquiry should be addressed to the Director of Stu- 
dent Aid and Scholarships, Box 7, Southern Station, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 

PLAN FOR FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS 

The curriculum requirements below are for all students in the School work- 
ing toward the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

The transfer student should conform to the suggested curriculum as far as 
possible. 

CURRICULUM FOR FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES 

Freshman Year / 

English 101, 102, 103— Freshman Composition 12 

History 101, 102— World Civilization 8 ^ / 

Political Science 101 — American Government 4 \S 

♦Mathematics 100 or 101 4 or V 

Mathematics 112 or 102 4 ^ 

Science 12 ^^y 

**Office Administration 101 Proficiency Typewriting 4 or 0V^ 

Military Science and/or Physical Education Activity Courses 3 or 

(Male students must take both) 
Electives (See explanation under "Electives") or 11 



*** 



51 

♦Mathematics 100 or 101 is required only for those students who feel they have an inade- 
quate background of algebra from high school. Other students may go directly into Mathe- 
matics 112 or 102. Industrial Management majors must choose Math 101 and 102. 
**A student may not take Office Administration 101 if he has had a year of high school 
typewriting and may be excused from the course if he demonstrates proficiency. 
***Finance 100, Introduction to Business, is strongly recommended as an elective for 
those students wishing a survey course in business to prepare them for the advanced 
courses. 

Sophomore Year 

Public Address 101 — Oral Communication 4 

Fine Arts (Music 165, Art 120, or THE 103) 4 ^ 

English 201, 202— Introduction to Literature 8 ^ 

Philosophy 101 or 210 and Psychology 201 or Sociology 103 8 ^ 

Economics 251, 252 — Principles of Economics 8 w - / 

Accounting 201, 202, 203— Principles of Accounting 12 ^ 

Finance 300 or CSS 200 (Statistics) 4 *> 

Military Science and/or Physical Education Activity Courses 3 or 

(Male students must take both) 

Electives (See explanation under "Electives") or 3 

51 

PLAN FOR JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

Business Core 

In addition to the specific requirements in the freshman and sophomore 
years, all students in the School of Business Administration are required to take 
the following core in business. 



4 6 



Accounting 



Course Title of Course Hours 

Business Education 300 — Business Writing 4 

Marketing 300— Principles of Marketing 4 

Economics 330 — Money and Banking 4 

Finance 310, 311— Business Law 8 

Management 360— Principles of Management 4 

Finance 375 — Business Problem Analysis and Report Writing 2 

♦Finance 389 — Corporation Finance 4 

30 

♦Accounting majors may substitute Finance 452, Investment Finance. 

Major Requirements 

The majors are outlined under the department in which they are located. 
With the consent of his adviser, a student occasionally may make a substitution 
for one of his required courses. 

Minor Requirements 

There is no minor required for the Bachelor of Science in Business Ad- 
ministration except for the student who majors in General Business. This stu- 
dent must complete 28 hours in a department which offers a major. He may not 
minor in Finance or Management within the School of Business Administra- 
tion. Otherwise, he may minor in Accounting, Economics, or Marketing, or in 
any other department within the University. A minor in Accounting, Economics 
or Marketing will require five advanced courses above the requirements listed 
in the freshman curriculum, sophomore curriculum, and business core. The se- 
lection of a minor in other areas of the University should be discussed with 
the student's adviser. 

ELECTIVES 

A student must take eight additional quarter hours outside the School of 
Business Administration in any department he chooses. The remainder of his 
electives may be taken within the School of Business Administration or from 
any other department within the University. The student majoring in Indus- 
trial Management must take Industrial Arts 121. 

DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING (ACC) 

H. O. Jackson, Acting Chairman 
Anderson, Bizzell, Calcote, Carpenter, Estes, J. Kelley, Kenamond, Taylor 

Those students who plan to major in Accounting should take Accounting 
201, 202, and 203 in their freshman year and postpone part of their Basic College 
core. They should continue by taking Accounting 301 and 302 in their sopho- 
more year. 

The following courses are recommended for students planning to minor 
in Accounting: Accounting 202, 203, 301, 302, and three advanced accounting 
courses. 

ACCOUNTING 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum 102 

Business core 30 

Accounting courses as listed below 36 

Accounting ^01 — Intermediate Accounting I 4 

Accounting 302 — Intermediate Accounting II 4 

Accounting 310— Auditing 4 

Accounting 320 — Cost Accounting 4 

Accounting 330— Federal Income Tax 4 

Accounting 401 — Advanced Accounting 4 

Accounting 405 — Current Accounting Theory and Research 4 

Accounting Electives 8 

Electives 24 

192 



147 



School of Business Administration 



ACCOUNTING COURSES (ACC) 
201 — Principles of Accounting I. Four hours. 

The meaning and purpose of accounting; accounting statements and the ac- 
counting cycle; special journals; notes and interest; bad debts; inventories. 

202 — Principles of Accounting II. Four hours. 

Plant assets and depreciation; bank reconciliation and petty cash; 'voucher 
system; concepts and principles; payrolls; taxes; partnerships; corporations. 

203 — Principles of Accounting III. Four hours. 

Departmental and branch accounting; job order, process, and standard cost 
accounting; budgeting and internal reports; source and application of funds; 
statement analysis. 

300 — Administrative Applications of Accounting. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ACC 203. 

A study of the uses of accounting data with particular emphasis on form, 
analysis, and interpretation of financial statements. 

301 — Intermediate Accounting I. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ACC 203. 

A resume of accounting theory and a brief review of accounting statements, 
followed by an intensive study of inventories, tangible and intangible fixed as- 
sets, cash and temporary investments, receivables, and current and contingent 
liabilities. 

302 — Intermediate Accounting II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ACC 301. 

A study of permanent investments, long-term debt, corporate capital, state- 
ments from incomplete data, correction of errors, special problems of income 
determination, analytical techniques, fund and cash flow statements. 

310— Auditing I. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ACC 301 and 302. 

A study of auditing principles, techniques, and procedures, professional 
ethics and legal responsibility, the audit program, field work, and the audit re- 
port. 

320 — Elementary Cost Accounting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ACC 301 or consent of instructor. 

Manufacturing statements and cost terminology; job order and process cost 
accounting; material, labor, and overhead costs; standard costs and variance 
analysis; direct costing; spoilage; joint and by-product costing. 

330 — Federal Income Tax Accounting I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ACC 301 or consent of instructor. 

An introductory course with emphasis on the computation and reporting of 
ordinary income, capital gains and losses, exclusions, and deductions applicable 
principally to individuals. 

401 — Advanced Accounting. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ACC 302 or consent of instructor. 

Partnership accounting, joint ventures, consignments and installment sales, 
home office and branch, fund accounting, and annuities. 

405-G405 — Current Accounting Theory and Research. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ACC 310, 320, 330 and 401 or consent of instructor. 

The study of current accounting problems, with special emphasis on the 
published bulletins (pronouncements) of professional accounting organizations. 
Students will explore specific contemporary controversial topics and write re- 
search papers. 



148 



Economics 



410-G410— Auditing II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ACC 310. 

A study of AICPA audit bulletins, application of statistical sampling tech- 
niques to auditing, review of internal control procedures, and case studies in 
auditing procedures. 

420-G420 — Advanced Cost Accounting and Budgeting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ACC 320. 

A study of the managerial uses of accounting data including budgetary pro- 
cedures and control. Emphasis will be on analyzing cost behavior, distribution 
costing, cost analysis, break-even analysis, cost-profit-volume relationships, de- 
cision making, budget preparation, cash and capital budgeting. Students will 
also be required to write a research paper on a selected topic. 

430-G430 — Federal Income Tax Accounting II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ACC 330. 

A continuation of Accounting 330 with emphasis on research in taxation, 
accounting methods, special sales, payment of taxes, guides for partnerships, 
estates, trusts, and corporations, and preparation and filing of required returns. 

450-G450 — Accounting Systems. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ACC 310. 

A study of the nature and procedure of systems work with attention given 
to the design and use of business papers and forms, mechanical equipment and 
auxiliary devices, punched-card accounting methods, journals, ledgers, internal 
checks, and applied accounting systems and procedures. 

460-G460 — Consolidated Statements and Accounting for Fiduciaries. Four 
hours. 

Prerequisite: ACC 401 or consent of instructor. 

Fiduciary accounting principles and reports, parent and subsidiary account- 
ing including consolidations and mergers, and foreign exchange. 

470-G470 — Municipal and Governmental Accounting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ACC 203. 

A study of the principles and standards of governmental accounting, with 
emphasis on classification of accounts, fund accounting, statements and reports. 

492-G492 — Research in Accounting Problems. One to four hours. 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of instructor. 

A seminar course for advanced study in problems in cost accounting, budget- 
ing, auditing, income tax, or governmental accounting. 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS (ECO) 

Kenneth R. Grubbs, Chairman 
deArrigunaga, Greene, Lee, McQuiston, Smith, Williams 

The major curricula in Economics are intended to prepare students for 
positions as economists in education, business, and government. The recom- 
mended minor in Economics constitutes a systematic study of the economic 
environment in which we live. A few advanced courses have been designed to 
provide appropriate instruction in Economics to students in other major fields; 
and several comprehensive introductory courses may be taken by those who 
are interested in Economics in a less formal way. 

The recommended minor in Economics for students outside the School of 
Business Administration consists of Economics 251, 252, 330, 340', 345, 400, and 
470. 

The School of Business Administration does not require a minor field. How- 
ever, a student in the School may, if he so desires, minor in Economics or in- 
clude an emphasis on Economics through his choice of electives. Such a student 
should consult closely with the Department of Economics faculty. 



149 



School of Business Administration 



ECONOMICS— BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Hours 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum 102 

Business core 30 

Major requirements as listed below 36 

Hours 

Economics 310 — Economic History of the United States 4 

Economics 340 — Price Theory 4 

Economics 345 — Income Theory 4 

Economics 470 — Comparative Economic Systems 4 

Economics (Electives) 20 

Electives* 24 

192 

♦Students considering graduate work in economics should consult frequently with Eco- 
nomics Department advisers, and are urged to take some mathematics courses beyond 
the minimum core requirements. 

ECONOMICS— BACHELOR OF ARTS 
FOREIGN TRADE— BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts in Economics or Foreign Trade is granted 
by the College of Arts and Sciences. Curricula are outlined in the College of 
Arts and Sciences section of this catalog. 

ECONOMIC COURSES (ECO) 

200 — Introduction to Economics. Four hours. 

Not to be counted toward major, minor, or meeting the core requirements 
of the School of Business Administration. Credit for graduation will not be 
given for both Economics 200 and 251. 

An elementary survey of political economy and economic analysis for stu- 
dents taking only one course of economics. 

251 — Principles of Economics I. Four hours. 

An introduction to political economy and economic analysis with reference 
to price determination in markets for both resources and final products under 
competition and monopoly. 

252 — Principles of Economics II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Normally preceded by ECO 251. 

An introduction to political economy and economic analysis with reference 
to international trade, economic growth, and the determination of income, em- 
ployment, and the price level. 

305 — Elementary Operations Research. Four hours. 

An introduction to the use of quantitative techniques in managerial de- 
cision-making. 

310 — Economic History of the United States. Four hours. 

A study of the economic forces that have influenced the development of the 
United States from its European origins to the present. 

330 — Money and Banking. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ECO 251 and 252. 

An intermediate study of the nature and functions of money, the banking 
system of the United States, and monetary theory. 

335 — Economics of the Firm. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ECO 251. 

An intermediate study of the application of economic theory to managerial 
decision-making. 

340— Price Theory. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ECO 251. 

An intermediate study of the determination of prices in factor and final 
product markets. 



I50 



Economics 






345 — Income Theory. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ECO 252. 

An intermediate study of the determination of income and employment. 

365 — Economics of Labor. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ECO 251 and 252. 

A study of the labor market with special reference to the institutional set- 
ting, wage determination, and employment problems in an industrial economy. 

400- G400— Public Finance. Four hours. 
Prerequisites: ECO 251 and 252. 

A study of federal and state spending and fund raising policies within the 
context of the social goals to be accomplished by such policies. 

405-G405 — Quantitative Analysis in Economics I. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ECO 335 or 340 or consent of instructor. 
Usually offered in alternate years. 

A survey of mathematical concepts particularly suited for their applica- 
tion in economic theory of consumer and theory of the firm. 

406-G406 — Quantitative Analysis in Economics II. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ECO 405. 
Usually offered in alternate years. 

Design, estimation, and testing of mathematical models in economic theory, 
with emphasis on microeconomics. 

420-G420 — Economics of Public Utilities. Four hours. 
Prerequisites: ECO 251 and 252. 
Usually offered in alternate years. 

A study of the development, institutional bases, structure, and regulation 
of public utilities. 

430-G430 — Economics of Urban Areas. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ECO 251 and 252. 

Usually offered in alternate years. 

A study of the economic problems of urban areas, with special reference to 
the problem of urban land utilization and the spending and fund-raising prob- 
lems of municipal government. 

435-G435 — International Trade Theory. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ECO 330. 

A study of the historical development of international trade theory, the im- 
portance of international trade, the mechanism of international payments, and 
modern theories dealing with the subject. 

436-G436 — International Economic Relations. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ECO 435. 

A study of the problems and policies arising out of international economic 
relations and practices. 

440-G440 — Economic Growth, Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ECO 330. 

A study of the nature, causes, and effects of regional and national economic 
development. 

445-G445 — Business Cycles. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ECO 330. 

A study of the nature, causes, and effects of business cycles, and of policies 
to promote economic stability. 

450-G450 — Money Markets and Monetary Policy. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ECO 330. 

Usually offered in alternate years. 



*5* 



School of Business Administration 



A study of the nature and structure of money markets, of interest rate de- 
termination and patterns, and of the effects of monetary policy on money mar- 
kets. 

460 -G460— Fiscal Theory. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ECO 330. 

Usually offered in alternate years. 

A study of the theoretical bases for governmental fiscal operations. 

470-G470 — Comparative Economic Systems. Four hours. 
A course designed to acquaint the student with the origins, development, 
and characteristics of fascism, socialism, communism, and capitalism. 

482-G482 — Contemporary Economic Problems I. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: ECO 330. 
Usually offered in alternate years. 

A study of the economic problems of monopoly, international trade, and in- 
come distribution. 

484-G484 — Contemporary Economic Problems II. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: ECO 330. 
Usually offered in alternate years. 

A study of the economic problems of the business cycle, inflation, growth, 
and the size and influence of the public economy. 



DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE (FIN) 

R. E. Wubbels, Chairman 

Clements, Hardin, Jordan, Otto, Rittenhouse, Weisend, West 

The objective of the Department of Finance is to prepare its graduates to 
assume responsible positions in private business and financial institutions and 
governmental agencies, to promote and operate their own businesses more 
effectively, or to continue study in graduate or professional schools. The cur- 
ricula in the Department are designed to give the student a broad knowledge 
of our society and of the business world in which he will function. Enough 
specialization is included to prepare students for positions in respective areas 
of business. The Department includes majors in Finance, General Business, 
and Real Estate and Insurance. 

The recommended minor in General Business for a non-business major 
is Accounting 201 and 202 or Economics 251, 252; Finance 389, and four ad- 
vanced courses in the Department. There is no minor in Finance. 

Major — General Business 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum 102 

Business core 30 

Major requirements, minor and electives 60 

Finance 415 or Economics 400 — Gov't, and Bus., or Public Finance 4 

Finance 325 — General Insurance 4 

Economics 365 — Economics of Labor 4 

Management 364 — Personnel Management 4 

Electives in Finance or Management 8 

*Minor and Electives 36 

•A major in General Business may not minor in Management or Finance but may minor 

in any other department within the School of Business Administration or may choose a 
minor in any other department within the University. 



15* 



Finance 



Major — Finance 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum . . , 102 

Business core 30 

Major requirements as listed below 32 

Finance 325 — General Insurance 4 

Finance 350 — Banking Administration 4 

Finance 370 or Economics 360— Applied Statistics or 

Business Cycles 4 

Finance 452 — Investment Finance 4 

Economics 410 — Public Finance 4 

Finance 480— Financial Management 4 

Electives in Finance 8 

Electives 28 

Major — Real Estate and Insurance 

Freshman and Sophomore Currriculum 102 

Business Core 30 

Major requirements as listed below 

Finance 325 — General Insurance 4 

Finance 330— Real Estate 4 

Finance 425 — Life Insurance 4 

Finance 430— Real Estate Law 4 

Finance 432 — Real Estate Finance 4 

Finance 445 — Fire and Casualty Insurance 4 

Electives in Finance 8 

Electives 28 

FINANCE COURSES (FIN) 

100 — Introduction to Business. Four hours. 

This course may not be taken for credit by juniors and seniors following 
programs in the School of Business Administration. 

An introductory course to practically all phases of the business and 
economic world. 

290 — Concepts of Business Data Processing. Two hours. 
To acquaint the student with the various types of data processing equip- 
ment and to give a concept of the steps involved in processing business data. 

300 — Elementary Statistics. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 102 or 112. 

This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed 
CSS 200. 

A survey of probability concepts, measurements of central tendencies and 
dispersion, statistical inference, and correlation. 

310 — Business Law. Four hours. 

The fundamental principles of law that apply to common business trans- 
actions. 

311 — Business Law. Four hours. 

A more specific course in law as applied to business, especially suitable for 
the accouunting, finance, and insurance majors. 

320 — Personal and Family Finance. Four hours. 

A study of the financial problems that people encounter in planning and 
managing their own individual affairs. Emphasis is given to choosing an oc- 
cupation, budgeting, borrowing, savings and investments, life insurance, social 
security and annuities, home ownership, taxes, estate planning, and wills and 
trusts. 



J 53 



School of Business Administration 



325 — General Insurance. Four hours. 

A beginning course in insurance designed to explain the fundamental 
principles of risk and risk bearing and to introduce the insurance mechanism 
as a device for reducing risk and sharing losses. 

330— Real Estate. Four hours. 

An introduction to the field of real estate covering the principles of valua- 
tion, appraisal, financing and marketing of real estate. 

350 — Bank Administration. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ECO 330. 

A comprehensive survey of practical bank administration, covering such 
topics as bank practices and problems, loans and discounts, investments, fiduci- 
ary and other services, and the money market. 

361 — The Organization and Operation of a Small Business. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Principles of Accounting and Economics. 

A course designed to give the student a knowledge of sound business 
principles to be applied to the problems of organizing and operating a small 
business. 

370 — Applied Business Statistics. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: A basic course in statistics. 

The use of statistics in solving business problems. 

375 — Business Problem Analysis and Report Writing. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Completion of Business Core. 

To develop the student's ability to use sources of business information, 
handle tabular and graphic presentation, and write business reports based upon 
research and statistical techniques applied to problem-solving. 

389 — Corporation Finance. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ACC 203 and ECO 252. 

A course dealing with the organization of corporations, methods of financ- 
ing and types of securities, analysis of causes of failure, and rehabilitation of 
bankrupt corporations. 

415-G415 — Government and Business. Four hours. 

A study of the place of government in the business world, with emphasis 
on types of controls, regulation of public service corporations and financial in- 
stitutions, laws to enforce competition, and government aids to business. 

425-425G — Life Insurance. Four hours. 

A comprehensive treatment of life insurance, with the use of materials 
paralleling those approved by the American College of Life Underwriters. 

430 — Real Estate Law. Four hours. 

Designed to give the student a general background in real estate law cover- 
ing such major points as land and its elements, easements, titles, deeds, record- 
ing, brokers and managers, contracts of sales, insurance, and landlord and 
tenant, with emphasis on case and problem solutions. 

432-G432— Real Estate Finance. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: FIN 330. 

Functions of real estate finances; the loan contract; the mortgage market; 
elements of mortgage risk; loan policy and administration of loans; and analysis 
of current mortgage market conditions. 

440- G440— Transportation. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Principles of Economics, Marketing, and junior standing. 

The principles, practices and problems of transportation that prevail in 
the United States. 

445 — Fire and Casualty Insurance. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: A previous course in insurance. 

An analysis of the fire policy, consequential loss contracts, ocean and inland 
marine risks, automobile underwriting, business liability protection. 



154 



Management 



452-G452 — Investment Finance. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: FIN 450. 

The techniques of investment analysis as applied to industrial, railroad, 
public utility, and other securities, with emphasis placed upon the importance 
of a knowledge of American industry. 

480-G480 — Financial Management. Four hours. 

A study of the theory of assembling, investing, and managing capital. The 
principles of choosing from among available, alternative combinations of 
short-term debt, long-term debt, and equity. The principles of evaluating and 
selecting capital projects; and the principles for combining capital and other 
inputs in such a way as to maximize efficiency and maintain liquidity. 

492 — Independent Study. Four hours. 

A case problem to be worked out to meet the needs of the particular stu- 
dent; to include a research paper to be presented to the major professor and 
chairman of the department. 

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT (MGT) 

Martin Stegenga, Chairman 
Bracey, J. Davis, Ellis, Sanford, Etzold, Reeves 

The program of study in management has two major objectives: (1) to give 
the student a broad perspective of the organization and operation of the modern 
business enterprise, with particular reference to its relationship to the economy 
as a whole and (2) to prepare the student, by specialized training, to begin em- 
ployment which may lead to positions of managerial responsibility. 

Students interested in the management field have the option of electing to 
major in either Industrial Management or Personnel Management. The Indus- 
trial Management option places emphasis on production activities, motion and 
time study, wage incentive methods, and the nature and characteristics of spe- 
cific industries. The Personnel Management option emphasizes the study of 
collective bargaining, labor law and legislation, the administration of wage 
systems, and the administration of personnel with special reference to the 
human relations aspects of the business enterprise. 

Careers in management are available in industry, government, and teach- 
ing. Beginning employment opportunities for which the management graduate 
is trained include such sample jobs as: job analyst, foreman, production sched- 
uler and dispatcher, time study man, employment interviewer, assistant training 
supervisor, and junior management trainees. The student's broad education and 
training will, when coupled with additional maturity and experience, serve to 
further his career in more responsible management positions, such as production 
or plant manager, labor relations director, and personnel manager. 

The recommended minor in Management for a non-business major is Eco- 
nomics 251 and 252; Management 360; and four courses in the Management 
Department. 

Major — Personnel Management 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum 102 

Business Core 30 

Major requirements as listed below 36 

Accounting 300 — Administrative Applications of Accounting, 

or an advanced economics course 4 

Management 364 — Personnel Management 4 

Management 370 — Labor Law and Legislation 4 

Economics 410 — Economics of Labor 4 

Finance 415 — Government and Business 4 

Management 454 — Human Relations 4 

Management 456 — Industrial Training 2 



*55 



School of Business Administration 



Management 468 — Wage and Salary Administration 4 

Management 472 — Collective Bargaining 4 

Management 474 — Supervisory Management 2 

Management 484 — Problems in Personnel Administration 4 

Electives 24 

Major — Industrial Management 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum 104 

Business Core 30 

Major requirements as listed below 38 

Accounting 320— Elementary Cost Accounting 4 

Management 362 — Introduction to Industrial Management 4 

Management 370 — Labor Law and Legislation 4 

Finance 370 — Applied Business Statistics 4 

Management 386 — Industrial Safety 2 

Management 464 — Time and Motion Study 4 

Management 466 — Production and Quality Control 4 

Management 468 — Wage and Salary Administration 4 

Management 476 — Managerial Systems Analysis 4 

Management 482 — Production Problems Seminar 4 

Electives 20 

MANAGEMENT COURSES (MGT) 

360 — Principles of Management. Four hours. 

Basic management concepts and principles applied to the functions of plan- 
ning, organization, and control in business enterprise. 

362 — Introduction to Industrial Management. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MGT 360. 

The basic principles and policies in the management of an industrial plant, 
covering such topics as plant location and layout, purchasing, materials hand- 
ling, maintenance, and production control systems. 

364 — Personnel Management. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MGT 360. 

A course covering the tools of personnel management, with principal em- 
phasis on the major task of procuring, developing, maintaining, and using an 
effective work force. 

370 — Labor Law and Legislation. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MGT 360. 

A study of the development of legislation and of court decisions pertaining 
to labor relations. Special emphasis is given to the importance of legal principles 
involved in managerial decisions. 

386— Industrial Safety- Two hours. 

Prerequisite: MGT 362. 

A study of the nature, causes, and costs of industrial accidents and occupa- 
tional diseases. An analysis of safety problems and procedures in establishing 
industrial safety programs 

454 — Human Relations. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MGT 364. 

A study of individual and group interaction and behavior in the business 
and industrial environment with emphasis on interpersonal and intergroup mo- 
tivations and conflicts. 

456 — Industrial Training. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: MGT 364. 

A study of the methods, procedures, and psychology in planning and organ- 
izing effective in-service training programs for employees and management. 

464 — Motion and Time Study. Four hours. 
Prerequisites: MGT 362 and FIN 300 or MAT 320. 



56 



Marketing 



A general course in the fundamentals of operation analysis, motion economy, 
micromotion techniques, time study, job standards, and fatigue and industrial 
efficiency. 

466 — Production and Quality Control. Four hoursJ 

Prerequisites: MGT 362 and FIN 300 or MAT 320. 

An evaluation of some of the problems of management as they relate to the 
production and quality of output, with emphasis upon statistical methods and 
other management techniques to achieve acceptable quality in production at 
minimum cost. 

468-G468— Wage and Salary Administration. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: MGT 362 or MGT 364. 

A study of wage and salary structures; preparation and use of job analyses, 
descriptions, and specifications; job evaluation, incentive systems, and individ- 
ual wage determination; and wage surveys, fringe benefits, and merit rating 
systems. 

472-G472 — Collective Bargaining. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MGT 370. 

A study of the practices, techniques, procedures, methods, and legal and 
administrative requirements of collective bargaining, with a consideration of 
the points of view of the worker, the union, the employer, and the general public. 

474 — Supervisory Management. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: MGT 360 or MGT 364. 

A study of the responsibilities of the line supervisor; development of tech- 
niques and skills in job training, maintenance of morale, motivation, handling 
grievances, interviewing, and counseling through case studies, role playing, and 
conference procedures. 

476 — Managerial Systems Analysis. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: MGT 464 and MGT 466. 

An analysis of management systems and procedures techniques for im- 
proving managerial controls and reducing operating costs; includes a study of 
work measurement, forms control, Monte Carlo and queuing theories, and an 
introduction to electronic data processing concepts and business applications. 

482-G482 — Production Problems Seminar. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Management majors only and consent of adviser. 

Special study of selected current problems in manufacturing production. A 
case approach to such problems as plant and warehouse location, selection and 
maintenance of equipment, product mix and quality, purchasing, and production 
controls. 

484-G484 — Problems in Personnel Administration. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Management majors only and consent of adviser. 

An application through case analysis of the principles and techniques in 
personnel administration. A problems and case approach to develop proficiency 
in applying principles and developing decision -making ability. 

DEPARTMENT OF MARKETING (MKT) 

Richard C. Vreeland, Chairman 
Bullard, Ellis, Sorbet, Szilasi 
There are three basic functions performed by any business organization: 
marketing, production, and finance. The goal of the Department of Marketing 
is to train students to fill competently positions as managers of the marketing 
function. It is necessary, therefore, that the student not only learn the subject 
of marketing but that he also master certain executive skills, of which ability 
to think is usually considered the most important. Other attributes of significance 
are the ability to: (1) solve problems; (2) communicate orally and in writing; 
(3) understand and work with people. 



*57 



School of Business Administration 



The context of marketing courses provides the student with a basic knowl- 
edge of marketing principles and techniques. The method used in teaching the 
material enables the student to develop the skills necessary to utilize this 
knowledge after graduation. 

For a student not majoring in the School of Business Administration, a 
minor in Marketing can be earned by completing 28 hours of courses in the fol- 
lowing recommended sequence: 

1. Finance 100, and Marketing 300 

2. Marketing 330, 332, and 355 (select any two) 

3. Marketing 400, 432, or 375 (select one) 

4. Any two marketing electives 

Students majoring in Marketing are required to take a specialized program 
in either General Marketing, Sales and Sales Management, Advertising, or Re- 
tail Management. In each of these programs a marketing core of three courses 
is essential and should be completed in the following recommended sequence 
during the senior year: 

1. Marketing 370, Marketing Problems 

2. Marketing 410, Marketing Research 

3. Marketing 480, Marketing Management 

The courses needed to complete an area of specialization are listed below: 

General Marketing 

Staff, Advisers 

Hours 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum . . 102 

Business Core 30 

Major requirements as listed below 32 

Marketing 330 — Salesmanship 4 

Marketing 332 — Principles of Retailing 4 

Marketing 355 — Principles of Advertising 4 

Marketing Core 12 

Marketing Electives 8 

Electives 28 

Sales and Sales Management 

Mr. Ellis, Adviser 

Hours 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum 102 

Business Core 30 

Major requirements as listed below 32 

Marketing 330 — Salesmanship 4 

Marketing 400 — Sales Management 4 

Marketing Core 12 

Marketing Electives 12 

Electives 28 

Advertising 

Dr. Sorbet, Adviser 

Hours 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum 102 

Business Core 30 

Major requirements as listed below 32 

Marketing 355— Principles of Advertising 4 

Marketing 375 — Advanced Advertising 4 

Marketing 475 — Promotion Development 4 

Marketing Core : 12 

Marketing Electives 8 

Electives 28 



158 



Marketing 



Retail Management 

Dr. Vreeland, Adviser 

Hours 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum 102 

Business Core 30 

Major requirements as listed below 32 

Marketing 332 — Principles of Retailing 4 

Marketing 435 — Advanced Retailing 4 

Marketing Core 12 

Marketing Electives 12 

Electives 28 

MARKETING COURSES (MKT) 

300 — Principles of Marketing. Four hours. 

A survey course designed to give a general understanding of marketing in 
present day society, the channels involved in the distribution of goods, the func- 
tions performed by the institutions and agencies in marketing. 

330 — Salesmanship. Four hours. 

A study of the principles of persuasion as applied to the art of salesmanship. 

332 — Principles of Retailing. Four hours. 

A survey course comprising an analysis of the factors underlying the suc- 
cessful operation of retail stores including location, stock arrangement, buying 
and selling, advertising and display, merchandise, planning and control, per- 
sonnel management, and customer relations. 

355 — Principles of Advertising. Four hours. 

A study of methods used to disseminate among groups information concern- 
ing goods and services, the sales promotional aspects of such dissemination, and 
the evaluation techniques available. 

360— Credit and Collection. Four hours. 

A study of the nature of credit in its relation to the distribution of goods, 
the management activities involved, and collection procedures available. 

370— Marketing Problems. Four hours. 

An introductory course in problem-solving techniques which emphasizes 
creative problem-solving methodology as applied to marketing. 

375 — Advanced Advertising. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MKT 355. 

A study of principles and techniques of advertising presentation adaptable 
to mass communication media and direct advertising. 

380— Industrial Marketing. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MKT 300. 

A study of the special problems involved in marketing materials, equip- 
ment, and supplies to manufacturers, other business firms, and institutions that 
use the goods in further production; determination of methods and policies ap- 
propriate to the goods and the marketing situations. 

400 — Sales Management. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MKT 330. 

A study of the principles involved in the selection, training, and manage- 
ment of salesmen. Also considered is the application of these principles in order 
to make the selling function more efficient. 

410-G41G— Marketing Research. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MAT 320. 

A study of principles and techniques used in marketing research to solve 
factual and qualitative marketing problems. 



*59 



School of Business Administration 



432-G432— Advanced Retailing. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: MKT 332. 

A study of the various operations performed in a retail store. The modified 
case method of instruction is used. 

475-G475 — Promotion Development. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MKT 355 or consent of instructor. 

A study of the relationship of the business organization to the various 
interest groups which affect its promotional results, and the policies and pro- 
cedures utilized in connection with such groups. 

480-G480 — Marketing Management. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Open only to majors or minors in Marketing during their 
senior year. 

A comprehensive course designed to synthesize the more specialized 
marketing knowledge of the student. The interrelation of all marketing activi- 
ties in reaching the firm's objectives is emphasized through the study of case 
histories. 



160 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Carl L. McQuagge, Dean 
L. Conrad Welker, Assistant Dean 

The University of Southern Mississippi, through its School of Education 
and Psychology, holds membership in the American Association of Colleges for 
Teacher Education. All undergraduate programs in teacher education are fully 
accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

The teacher-education programs offered by the University on the under- 
graduate level fall into three major categories: Elementary Education, Second- 
ary Education, and Special Areas. For details of graduate teacher-education 
programs, consult the Graduate Bulletin. 

PURPOSES 

The purposes of the School of Education and Psychology are: (1) to prepare 
teachers for the public schools and the colleges and universities of Mississippi 
and other states; (2) to offer, in addition to the undergraduate teacher- education 
programs categorized above, non -teaching degree programs on the under- 
graduate level in Library Science, Industrial Arts, Office Management, Execu- 
tive Secretarial Studies, Psychology, Corrective Therapy, and Recreation (for 
graduate level non-teaching degree programs, consult the Graduate Bulletin); 
(3) to provide clinical and professional services to the public schools of Mis- 
sissippi and to the University; and (4) to promote educational and psycho- 
logical research. 

These purposes are achieved through: (1) the work of the various depart- 
ments in the School; (2) clinics and offices for professional services; (3) co- 
operation with the public schools; and (4) cooperation with other colleges, 
schools, and divisions of the University in the development of teacher-educa- 
tion programs that meet requirements for Mississippi certification. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. A 2.1 quality point average on all courses undertaken. 

2. Completion of the University's Basic College core. 

3. A "C" average in Freshman English. (Courses with grades below "C" may be 

repeated to raise the grade) 

4. An application for admission must be made to the School of Education and 

Psychology and approved by the Dean of the School. The application must 
show all college work completed, quality point average, and a planned 
program for each quarter the student expects to be in the School of Educa- 
tion and Psychology. In addition to the above, the student must indicate a 
major and a minor if required. A student enrolled in the Basic College of 
the University of Southern Mississippi will file a completed application for 
transfer from the Basic College. Transfers into the School of Education and 
Psychology from other colleges will be given tentative approval based upon 
an evaluation of the transcripts filed with the Admissions Office. Upon 
coming to the campus for registration, each transfer student will be re- 
quired to file the program plan for each quarter required to complete his 
degree. When this is done the student will be given final approval for ad- 
mission, clearing him for registration. (See instructions for filing applica- 
tions and programs.) 

5. All applicants to a teacher-education program will be screened for charac- 

teristics that might impair their teaching effectiveness. The screening proc- 
ess will be part of FED 300 which every applicant to teacher- education 
except music education majors must take. Music education majors will be 
screened by the Music Education Department. Any student who is not ap- 
proved by the screening may appeal to the Dean of the School of Educa- 
tion and Psychology for further consideration by a special committee. 
The student will make application for admission to a teacher- education 
program during the quarter he takes FED 300. 



161 



Teacher-Education 



TEACHER-EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND REQUIREMENTS 

No program in teacher- education is available to the student still enrolled in 
the Basic College. The student must be admitted to an upper-level college, 
school, or division of the University and must be approved for a teacher-educa- 
tion program by the Dean of the School of Education and Psychology before 
entering upon the program. 

Having completed the Basic College core, students enrolling in the School 
of Education and Psychology to seek teaching degrees must also complete the 
additional requirements of the School and the special requirements for the 
major and minor in teacher-education programs. These requirements are de- 
tailed below. 

To prepare for a career in Elementary Education, grades one through 
eight, the student will engage in a comprehensive elementary education pro- 
gram which requires no minor area of study. The recommended program of 
studies is treated in detail under the Elementary Education Section of this 
catalog. 

To prepare for a career in Secondary Education, grades seven through 
twelve, the student will major in an academic area and minor in Secondary 
Education, following the Secondary Education curriculum recommended below. 
The academic majors available for certification in Secondary Education are: 
Biology German 

Business Education (40-49 hours) History* 

Chemistry Home Economics (52 hours)** 

Economics* Industrial Arts (45 hours) 

English (45 hours) Library Science 

French Mathematics 

General Science Physics 

General Speech Political Science* 

Geography* Sociology* 

Spanish 

♦Students majoring in economics, geography, history, political science, or sociology and 
minoring in Secondary Education must include in their degree programs the following 
courses: world history — 8 quarter hours; American' history — 8 quarter hours; Mississippi 
history — 4 quarter hours; economics — 4 quarter hours; political science — 4 quarter hours; 
geography — 4 quarter hours. 

Note: One cannot be certified in economics, geography, history, political science, or 
sociology. (See note above for requirements). A major in one of the social studies areas 
is a University requirement. 

**Home Economics majors will enroll in the Division of Home Economics, but will 
also apply to the School of Education and Psychology for approval of their secondary edu- 
cation teaching program. 

The Special Areas in which teacher-education programs are available, 

grades one through twelve, are: 

School of Fine Arts 

Art Education 
Music Education 

School of Education and Psychology 

Audiology*** 

Health and Physical Education (22 hours Health, 22 hours Physical 

Education) 
Language Disorders*** 
Library Science 
Special Education 
Speech Pathology*** 

♦♦♦Curricula for the Audiology, Language Disorders, and Speech Pathology majors 
will be found in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Any student preparing to become a Special Areas teacher in one of these 
major fields will enroll in the School of Education and Psychology, and will then be as- 
signed to the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences for courses in the major. The 
teaching degree will be awarded by the School of Education and Psychology. 



:6i 



Teacher- Education 



TEACHING DEGREES 

The student preparing to teach will normally pursue the Bachelor of Science 
teaching degree which is offered only in the School of Education and Psychology. 
The major exception is Home Economics, as explained in the note above. The 
student preparing to teach may also pursue the Bachelor of Arts degree, with 
Secondary Education as the minor. This B.A. teaching degree may be awarded 
by either the College of Arts and Sciences or the School of Education and Psy- 
chology. However, if the student elects to pursue the B.A. degree from the 
College of Arts and Sciences with Secondary Education as a minor, the stu- 
dent's program must be approved by the Dean of the School of Education and 
Psychology (all requirements for admission into a teacher- education program 
being applicable). 

CERTIFICATION 

A student completing successfully any of the degree programs listed above 
will meet the requirements for certification in Mississippi. He will also meet the 
accrediting requirements of the National Council of Accreditation for Teacher 
Education, and will receive the University of Southern Mississippi's institutional 
endorsement. Such institutional endorsement means that the student will be 
certified automatically in about thirty states in addition to Mississippi. 

COMBINED BASIC COLLEGE CORE AND SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND 
PSYCHOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHING DEGREE 

In addition to the Basic College core curriculum, the requirements of the 
School of Education and Psychology consist of courses essential to certification 
and institutional endorsement. These requirements vary for elementary and 
secondary education degree candidates. The National Teacher Examination is 
required of all candidates for the teaching degree. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Students preparing for elementary teaching must satisfy the following pro- 
gram requirements. Due to the comprehensive nature of the Elementary Edu- 
cation sequence, the following courses satisfy Basic College core curriculum 
and major and minor area requirements for an Elementary Education major in 
the School of Education and Psychology. The combined requirements- are: 

Courses by Departments: Hours 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202 or 433 20 

History 101 and 102 8 

Science 20 

Physical Science— FS 104 and 105—8 hours 

Biological Science— FS 106 and 107—8 hours 

Science Education 432 — 4 hours 

Mathematics 100 and 318 8 

Social Science 12 

Political Science 101—4 hours 

Elect Two different courses from the following: 
Economics 200 or 251 
Geography 103 

Sociology 103 or 201 — 8 hours 
Physical Education— 6 non- credit activity courses 

Health 179 and PE 409 8 

Military Science (men only) 6 

Public Address 101 or 310 4 

Psychology 201, Educational Psychology 316 and 319 12 

Music 165 (if Art 120 is not elected) and Music 361, Music 362 8 or 12 

Art 120 (if Music 165 is not elected) and Art 107 and 309 8 or 12 



63 



School of Education and Psychology 



Foundations in Education 300, 416, and 469 12^ 

Elementary Education 301, 305, 306, 309, 311, 317, 412 28 

Student Teaching 480 or 482 and EED 343 16 

Electives (including Military Science) 24 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

As noted above, the student preparing to teach at the secondary school level 
takes an academic major in a subject-matter field and a minor in Secondary 
Education. Advisement in the subject matter area will be given by the Depart- 
ment Chairman or someone he designates. Advisement for professional educa- 
tion will be given by the Chairman of the Department of Secondary Education. 
The combined requirements are: 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202 or 433 20 

History 101, 102 8 

Science 16 

Non-Science Majors 

Biological Science — 8 hours 
Physical Science — 8 hours 
Science majors must take laboratory sciences and should see re- 
quirements for majors in the sciences. Non-science majors may 
take Fundamentals of Science. 

Mathematics (any four quarter hour course) 4 

Social Science 12 

Political Science 101 — 4 hours 
Elect two courses from the following for 8 hours 
Economics 200 or 251 
Sociology 103 or 201 
Geography 103 
Other Courses — Students planning to enter the School of Education 

and Psychology must take the following „ 16 

Health 179 
Public Address 101 
Psychology 201 
Music 165 or Art 120 
Secondary Education Minor 

Foundations Education 300 4 

Educational Psychology 332 and 319 8 

Secondary Education 313, 451, and 481* 20 

Foundations Education 469 4 

Physical Education — six quarters (no credit) 

Military Science (for men) 6 

Major requirements and electives will constitute the balance of the 

degree requirements. 
*See student teaching below. 

Requirements to teach social studies as a second field 

Students wishing to teach social studies in secondary schools as a second 
field (most high schools in Mississippi desire teachers certified to teach in more 
than one field) should take the following courses, either as core or as electives: 

History 101, 102, 251, 252, and 367 20 

Secondary Education 451L 4 

Political Science 101 (core requirement) 4 or 8 

Sociology 103 or 201 4 

Geography 370 4 

Social studies electives 8 or 4 

This list is designed to cover the principal social studies fields a high school 
teacher might be called upon to teach. 



164 



Student Teaching 



OFFICE OF STUDENT TEACHING 

Leroy Rogers, Director 
Brantley, Campbell, Cooley, Padgett, Peddicord, Phillips, Scoggins 

The basic purpose of the student teacher program is to provide all students 
in teacher-education with opportunities that will assist them in developing the 
skills and competencies necessary for a beginning teacher. The student teach- 
ing program provides an environment for a realistic evaluation of the strengths 
and weaknesses of prospective teachers. 

All student teaching is done in off- campus cooperating schools designated 
by the Director of Student Teaching. The student teacher's assignment is for 
a full-day, full-quarter for which he earns twelve quarter hours credit. Super- 
vision is provided by cooperating school personnel and faculty members of the 
University. 

Each student must follow the procedure listed below in submitting both 
his request and application for student teaching. 

REQUEST — Formal request must be submitted to the Office of Student Teach- 
ing during the registration period two quarters prior to student teaching. 
Request for fall quarter student teaching must be filed during the registra- 
tion period of the previous winter quarter. 
APPLICATION — On the day the student is regularly scheduled to register, one 
quarter prior to student teaching, the prospective student teacher must 
obtain his application for student teaching. The application must be com- 
pleted and submitted with his adviser's signature within ten days. 
All student teachers: 

1. Must have completed a minimum of 132 quarter hours of college work. 

2. Each candidate must have completed a minimum of 24 quarter hours 
in his major field, eight of which must have been taken in residence in this in- 
stitution. 

3. At the time the student submits his application he must have at least a 
2.2 over-all grade average. 

4. Candidates for student teaching in the elementary school must have 
completed the following courses: FED 300, EED 301, EED 305, EED 306, EED 
307, EED 309, EED 311, EPY 316, and SCE 432. 

5. Candidates for student teaching in the secondary school must have com- 
pleted the following courses: FED 300, EPY 319, EPY 332, SED 451, and other 
methods. 

6. Each candidate must have passed the English Proficiency Examination. 

7. Each candidate must have been admitted to a teacher- education program 
for at least two quarters. 

8. The student will be expected to spend the entire school day in an off- 
campus school designated by the Director of Student Teaching. 

Candidates for student teaching in the secondary school should register -for 
SED 313, Principles of Teaching in High School, simultaneously with student 
teaching. 

Candidates for student teaching in the elementary school should register 
for EED 343, Methods and Materials in Elementary Education, simultaneously 
with student teaching. 

For specific requirements, see Elementary Education courses listed as EED 
480, 482, 489, and Secondary Education courses listed as SED 481 A through S, 
and SED 489. 

Regulations for Admission to Student Teaching Seminar 
EED 489 and SED 489 

Student teaching for in-service will be offered each summer quarter for 
eight quarter hours. To be eligible for this course: 



i6 5 



School of Education and Psychology 



1. The applicant should submit evidence of two years teaching experience 
and a recommendation from a principal or superintendent under whom the 
applicant has worked. 

2. The applicant shall present evidence of a contract for the coming school 
year. 

3. The applicant shall have previously earned sixteen quarter hours from 
this institution and shall not be on probation. 

4. The applicant must be in an undergraduate degree program at this in- 
stitution. 

5. The applicant must be teaching in Mississippi. 

6. The applicant must meet all the requirements for Student Teaching. 

7. Permission to enroll in these classes shall be granted by the Director of 
Student Teaching following an interview with the applicant. 

8. Application for in-service student teaching must be made in the Student 
Teaching Office by March 30. 

CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-TEACHING DEGREES 

The School of Education and Psychology offers major programs in Psy- 
chology, Library Science, Office Management, Executive Secretarial Studies, 
Recreation, and Industrial Arts leading to the Bachelor of Science non-teaching 
degree. Students in Psychology, Library Science, and Architectural Technology 
may take programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree. The requirements 
for these non-teaching degrees are listed below. 

Bachelor of Science (Non-Teaching) 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202 or 433 20 

History 101, 102 8 

Science* ■ 12 

Mathematics 4 

Social Science 12 

Political Science 101 — 4 hours. 
Elect two courses from the following for 8 hours 
Economics 200 or 251 
Sociology 103 or 201 
Geography 103 

Other Courses in the Basic College 12 or 20 

**Philosophy 101 or 210 
Fine Arts— Music 165, Art 120, THE 103 
Public Address 101 
Psychology 201 
♦♦Psychology 202 

Physical Education non-credit (six quarters) 

Military Science (for men) 6 

Major requirements and electives will constitute the balance of the degree 

requirements. 

*Biology or physic recommended for psychology major. 

**Required for psychology majors only. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Same as Bachelor of Science non-teaching degree with the addition of 
twelve (12) to eighteen (18) hours of a foreign language. 

SPECIAL SCHOOL SERVICES 
Audio- Visual Center 

S. L. Knight, Director 

Recognizing a need for audio-visual services in the state, the University of 
Southern Mississippi has established an Audio-Visual Center on the campus. 
Activities of the Center include a film service for Mississippi schools, a program 
for the use of audio-visual materials in college classes, and courses in audio- 
visual education taught both on and off the campus. 



166 



Special Services 



The Center is prepared to assist local schools in setting up a program for 
the use of audio-visual materials, and to assist through in-service and pre- 
service training in the interpretation of the values derived from the use of 
audio-visual instructional aids in education. 

The film collection of the Audio-Visual Center comprises over 1,700 reels 
on educational subjects. The collection includes University -owned films and films 
deposited by members of the South Mississippi Educational Film Association. 
Through a cooperative agreement member schools buy a specified number of 
films which may be used each week from the total collection of the film library. 
Thus an educational film service is provided for the schools of Mississippi at a 
fractional part of rental charges customary with commercial film libraries. This 
cooperative film service has been in operation for a period of nineteen years 
with a success which predicts a permanently functioning organization. 

The film library, one of forty-nine in the United States with over 1,000 
primary instructional films, is an important part of the audio-visual courses 
providing many stimulating opportunities for students enrolled in audio -visual 
education. 

Any school interested in membership in the South Mississippi Educational 
Film Association should write to the Director, Audio-Visual Center, Box 54, 
University of Southern Mississippi, for further information. 

Psychological and Special Education Clinic 

L. Erl Mehearg, Director 

The University of Southern Mississippi, through the Psychological and 
Special Education Clinic, affords students opportunity for clinical experience in 
addition to the course work in the several areas of psychology and special 
education. The program provides for experience in diagnostic testing, psycho- 
logical appraisal, psychotherapy, and counseling for work with both children 
and adults in a clinic setting. 

An important function of the Clinic is to provide doctoral level graduate 
students specializing in the clinical area with a variety of experiences with 
different forms of maladaptive behavior and learning problems. 

Service to university students, the community, and the state in the form of 
diagnosis and treatment of emotional and learning problems is an additional 
major function of the Clinic. 

Members of the Clinic staff and the Psychology Department serve on 
regional screening teams which assist the public schools of the area in psy- 
chological appraisal of children and the determination of eligibility for place- 
ment in special education classes. The staff works very closely with the State 
Supervisor of Special Education and with state school systems to provide 
students with excellent practicum facilities and experience. 

The Developmental Reading Center 

Elizabeth M. Antley, Director 

The Developmental Reading Center is an organized group of professional 
people whose primary function is that of helping various segments of the popu- 
lation to improve their reading abilities. 

The Center's functions are varied, but its primary concern is that of edu- 
cating teachers in methods, techniques, materials, and equipment for effective 
reading in the classroom. Additional functions include the training of graduate 
and advanced graduate students for reading specialization in developmental 
or diagnostic and remedial reading. As a part of the diagnostic and remedial 
reading specialization of graduate students, the Center is able to offer limited 
services in diagnosis of reading problems and remedial reading to children re- 
ferred to the Center. The cost of the diagnostic evaluation which includes a 
suggested program of remedial procedures is $20.00, or a proportionate part, 
based on ability to pay. Remedial instruction for four periods a week is $20.00 
per month. 



6 7 



School of Education and Psychology 



Consultant services are available to schools throughout the state by the 
Center staff. An up-to-date collection of materials used for reading instruction 
and a library of children's books are open for examination. 

University students and adults may obtain testing, counseling, and special 
reading instruction by applying at the Center. The type of instruction offered 
will depend upon the type of help needed and the availability of instruction at 
the time of application. University students can also receive instruction in the 
reading areas of comprehension, vocabulary development, and study skills im- 
provement through enrolling in the Center's "Improvement of Study" course. 

An annual reading conference is held each June where nationally known 
reading authorities present the program. 

The Developmental Reading Center Faculty and graduate students con- 
duct research in reading and are available to assist other researchers in read- 
ing research. 

Speech and Hearing Center 

Robert Peters, Director 
The Speech and Hearing Center is operated by the Department of Speech 

and Hearing Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, but it works with the 

School of Education and Psychology very closely in the preparation of Special 

Education teachers. 

This Center has a dual function. It provides facilities for the training of 

specialists in the area of clinical speech and audiology, and provides clinical 

services for persons with speech and hearing problems. 

The Center's services include both diagnostic examinations and therapy 

programs for both children and adults who have speech or hearing problems. 

These services are available to both university students and members of the 

community at nominal fees. 

Speech and Hearing Center Services: 

Audiometric Pure Tone Test $ 5.00 

Diagnostic Hearing Evaluation 10.00 

Hearing aid evaluation 15.00 

Hearing evaluation for medical-legal compensation claims 25.00 

Diagnostic Speech evaluation 10.00 

Speech or Hearing Therapy fees per session 2.00 

Therapy fees for university students per quarter 5.00 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS EDUCATION (BED) 

Annelle Bonner, Chairman 
Baldwin, Cameron, Conerly, Ewell, Lewis, Reck 

The Department of Business Education offers curricula in Business Teacher 
Education, Office Management, a four-year program in Executive Secretarial 
studies, and a two-year program leading to a specialized certificate in Secre- 
tarial Training. 

The student who plans to teach business subjects on the high school level will 
follow the curriculum prescriptions which lead to the Bachelor of Science teach- 
ing degree. He will enroll in the School of Education and Psychology upon com- 
pletion of his work in the Basic College and, therefore, must meet the admission 
requirements for that school. His major field of concentration will be in busi- 
ness subject matter prescribed by the Department of Business Education. The 
professional education and psychology requirements constitute the minor. 

The recommended minor in Secretarial Studies is 12 hours in typewriting, 
12 hours in shorthand, and 12 hours in advanced business education courses. A 
year of typewriting and a year of shorthand taken in high school will reduce the 
number of recommended hours to 28. 

To complete the curriculum requirements in Business Teacher Education, 
Executive Secretarial Studies, or Secretarial Training, one course in typewriting 
and one course in shorthand must be taken at the University of Southern Mis- 



68 



Business Education 



sissippi. A student with one year of typewriting in high school cannot get credit 
for BED 101, and a student with one year of shorthand in high school cannot 
get credit for BED 201. A student who has had more work than this in either or 
both fields should consult with the Chairman of the Department of Business 
Education about the appropriate beginning courses for his program. 

Business Teacher Education 

College Core requirements 76 or 82 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

English 201 4 

English 202 or 433 4 

History 101, 102 8 

Mathematics 4 

Science — Biological and Physical (May be Fundamentals 

of Science) 16 

Political Science 4 

Economics 251 4 

Health 179 4 

Sociology 103 or 201, or Geography 103 4 

Public Address 101 4 

Psychology 201 4 

Fine Arts 4 

Physical Education (one course each quarter for six quarters) 

Military Science (for men) 6 

Professional education and psychology 36 

These courses constitute the minor in Business Teacher Education. 
The special method course is SED 451A. 

Departmental subject matter requirements 80 

BED 102, 310; BED 201, 202, 305, 371, 372; ACC 201, 202, 203; BED 
300, 352, 354, 385, 450, 452, 453, 460; ECO 252; FIN 310, 389; and 
MKT 300. Business skills courses taken in high school will reduce 
the total number of hours required for the major. 

Electives to complete a total of 192 hours 

192 
Office Management 

Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum 102 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, 202 or 433 20 

History 101, 102 8 

Laboratory Science 12 

Mathematics 8 

(Mathematics 100 or Algebra 101, Mathematics 112 or 320) 

Social Science • 16 

Political Science 101 4 

Economics 251, 252 8 

Health 179 4 

Sociology 103, 201 or Geography 103 (select one) 4 

Public Address 101 4 

Psychology 201 4 

Music 165 or Art 120 4 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 12 

Physical Education (one course each quarter for six quarters) 

Military Science (for men) 6 

Electives to complete 102 hours 

102 

Major requirements 7 8 

Business Education 101, 102, 310— Typewriting 12 

Business Education 300— Business Writing 4 

Business Education 352— Filing Systems and Records Management 2 
Business Education 354— Problems in Typewriting 2 



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School of Education and Psychology 



Business Education 385 — Office Practice and Procedures 4 

Business Education 450 — Office Appliances 4 

Business Education 460 — Office Management 4 

Marketing 300 — Principles of Marketing 4 

Finance 310, 311 — Business Law, 375 — Report Writing, and 

389 — Corporation Finance 14 

Economics 330 — Money and Banking 4 

Management 360 — Principles of Management, 364 — Personnel 
Management, 454 — Human Relations, and 464 — Motion and Time 

Study 16 

Psychology 202 — Applied Psychology 4 

Psychology 449 — Industrial Psychology 4 

*See note below relative to business skills courses. 
Electives to total 192 hours 12 



Executive Secretarial Studies 



192 



Freshman and Sophomore Curriculum 102 

The same curriculum as shown for Office Management with this 
exception: Only four hours of mathematics are required. 

Major requirements 72 

*Business Education 101, 102, 310— Typewriting 12 

*Business Education 201, 202, 305, 371, 372— Shorthand 20 

Business Education 300 — Business Writing 4 

Business Education 352 — Filing Systems and Records 

Management 2 

Business Education 354 — Problems in Typewriting 2 

Business Education 385 — Office Practice and Procedures 4 

Business Education 450 — Office Appliances 4 

Business Education 460 — Office Management 4 

Marketing 300 — Principles of Marketing 4 

Finance 310, 311 — Business Law, 389 — Corporation Finance 12 

Economics 330 — Money and Banking 4 

*Business skills courses taken in high school will reduce the total 
number of hours required for the major. Hours thus saved may be 
applied to these recommended courses: Finance 100 — Introduction 
to Business — Psychology 202 — Applied Psychology, Sociology 103 — 
Introduction to Sociology, FED 334 — Improvement of Study 

Electives to total 192 hours 18 

192 
Secretarial Training 
Two- Year Curriculum 

Required core courses 24 

English 101, 102, 103— English Composition 12 

Public Address 101 — Oral Communication 4 

Mathematics 100 — Basic Mathematics or 101 — Algebra 4 

Physical Education — Activity courses (one each quarter) 

Social Studies— Government 101, History 101 or 102, 

Sociology 103, Geography 143, or Psychology 201 (Select one) 4 

Required business courses as listed below 68 

*Business Education 101, 102, and 310— Typewriting 12 

♦Business Education 201, 202, 305, 371, and 372— Shorthand 20 

Business Education 300— Business Writing 4 

Business Education 352 — Filing Systems and Records Management 2 

Business Education 354 — Problems in Typewriting 2 

Business Education 385 — Office Practice and Procedures 4 

Business Education 450 — Office Appliances 4 



I 7 



Business Education 



Business Education 460— Office Management 4 

Accounting 201 and 202 — Principles of Accounting 8 

Economics 251 — Principles of Economics 4 

Finance 310 — Business Law 4 

Elective 4 

96 

*A student who has had one year of typewriting in high school will 
start his program with BED 102, and a year of shorthand in high 
school, with BED 202. The hours saved are to be used on the follow- 
ing courses: FIN 100, ECO 252, ACC 203, MKT 300, FED 334; or 
the Social Studies courses listed in the core requirements. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION COURSES (BED) 

101 — Elementary Typewriting. Four hours. 

This course is for beginners in typewriting. Emphasis is given to acquiring 
keyboard control, developing correct typewriting techniques, and applying this 
acquired skill to letter writing and simple tabulated reports. No credit is given 
to a student whose high school transcript shows one unit in typewriting. 

102 — Intermediate Typewriting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of BED 101 with grade of C or better 
or equivalent. 

A review of keyboard and manipulative controls, with emphasis on letter 
styles, manuscripts, and tabulated reports. Students who have had more than 
one year of typewriting in high school should enroll in BED 310. 

201 — Beginning Shorthand. Four hours. 

The theory and practice of Gregg shorthand, with emphasis on fluency of 
writing and reading; a limited amount of dictation and transcription. English 
101, 102, and 103 to be taken concurrently or to have been completed previously. 

202 — Intermediate Shorthand. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of BED 201 with grade of C or better, 
or equivalent. 

Completion of theory of Gregg shorthand, with some emphasis on dictation 
and transcription. English 101, 102, and 103 to be taken concurrently or to have 
been completed. 

300 — Business Writing. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ENG 101, 102, and 103, and ability to typewrite. 

A study of principles and techniques used in writing effective business let- 
ters, memorandums, and other forms of business communication. Emphasis is 
placed on analyzing and solving business problems through written communica- 
tion. 

305 — Dictation and Transcription. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of BED 202 with grade of C or better, 
or two years of high school shorthand. 

A constant automatic review of shorthand theory, developing the student's 
shorthand speed and emphasizing mailable transcripts. 

310 — Advanced Typewriting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of BED 102 with grade of C or better, 
or equivalent. 

Preparation of stencils, business forms, and legal documents; additional em- 
phasis on tabulations, manuscripts, and letter forms, as well as on speed and 
accuracy. 

340 — Adding and Calculator Machine Operation. Two hours. 



I7 1 



School of Education and Psychology 



Sufficient practice provided to develop a thorough working knowledge of 
the operations involved in the use of the following machines: rotary printing 
and key-driven calculators, and full keyboard and ten-key adding machines. 
This course may not be taken for credit by a student who has had BED 450 
or its equivalent. 

352— Filing Systems and Records Management. Two hours. 

An introduction to major filing systems in business, with a study of stand- 
ard rules for alphabetizing, practice in the use of common systems of filing, 
and the application of filing principles to specific types of businessess. 

354 — Problems in Typewriting. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of BED 310 with grade of C or better. 

A review of techniques in skill building, with development of speed and 
accuracy in typing a variety of office forms and emphasis on shortcuts in produc- 
tion typewriting. 

371 — Advanced Dictation and Transcription. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of BED 305 with grade of C or better. 

Emphasis on dictation and transcription using the vocabulary of different 
departments of businesses. 

372 — Executive Secretarial Shorthand. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of BED 371 with grade of C or better. 

The finishing course in shorthand dictation and transcription, with primary 
emphasis on mailable copy. 

385 — Office Practice and Procedures. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of BED 102 with grade of C or better, 
or equivalent. 

A course covering practical secretarial problems and the developing of an 
employable personality. 

450 — Office Appliances. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of BED 101 with grade of C or better, 
or equivalent. 

Sufficient practice to develop a thorough working knowledge of the opera- 
tions involved on calculators, adding machines, posting machines, transcribers, 
electric typewriters, mimeoscope, and direct process mimeograph duplicators. 

This course may not be taken for credit by a student who has had BED 
340 or its equivalent. 

452-G452 — Philosophy of Vocational Business Education. Four hours. 

History of vocational business education; changing concepts resulting from 
Federal legislation; changing nature of office systems and occupations; chang- 
ing employment opportunities and consequent changes in procedurers and 
techniques of vocational business education. 

453-G453 — Coordination of Office Occupations Programs. Four hours. 

Problems of the coordinator in the development of programs to meet the 
needs of employed youth and adults in the office occupations programs. 

460-G460— Office Management. Four hours. 

A study of the principles of management as applied to office work, covering 
office organization, supervision, layout, supplies, machines, personnel, office 
forms and reports, and office services. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS (FED) 

H. B. Easterling, Chairman 
Baxter, Brantley, Cooley, Gunn, Hagenson, S. L. Knight, Landskov, McQuagge, 
Miller, Peddicord, Spurlin, Welker, White, Wilier 
The Department of Educational Foundations is essentially a service depart- 
ment. It offers no degree programs or majors. Its purpose is to offer courses 
in education required by a number of departments in the University; also, 
those courses not specifically identified with the subject matter of any given 
department in the School. 



171 






Elementary Education 



EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS COURSES (FED) 

300 — Public Education in the United States. Four hours. 

An orientation to public education in the United States including the back- 
ground, purposes, organization, trends, and issues and the evolution of teaching 
as a profession. 

To be taken the last quarter of the sophomore year. 

Required as a phase of screening for admission to a teacher-education pro- 
gram in the School of Education and Psychology. 

334 — Improvement of Study. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

An analysis of effective study techniques for use by secondary school 
teachers. Useful for college students who wish to improve their own reading 
and study habits. 

336 — Principles of Guidance. Four hours. 

An introductory course dealing with the fundamental philosophy, methods, 
and organization of guidance services in the public schools. 

416 — Audio-Visual Education. Four hours. 

A general course for teachers with emphasis upon sound and visual class- 
room teaching aids. Careful attention given to the sources, selection, preparation, 
and uses of audio-visual materials. 

469 — Tests and Measurements. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: EPY 319, 332 or 316, and senior standing. 

Consideration of good evaluative practices in elementary and high schools, 
the preparation and use of informal objective and essay-type tests, a study of 
typical standard tests, and an introduction to elementary statistical procedures 
useful in interpretation of results. 

DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (EED) 

John P. Van Deusen, Chairman 
Antley, D. Knight, Easterling, Miller, Padgett, Phillips, Wall, Warren 

Students preparing to teach in the elementary school will enter a compre- 
hensive Elementary Education Program of studies which does not require an 
academic minor. The Elementary Education sequence, therefore, includes all 
requirements to satisfy both the major and minor area of study 

The required courses an elementary education major must satisfy are 
listed below in suggested sequence. Basic Colkge core curriculum require- 
ments must be satisfied within twelve hours of completion prior to admission 
into the Teacher-Education Program of the School of Education and Psy- 
chology. 

The Basic College requirements for Elementary Education are listed under 
the freshman and sophomore year schedules. Courses appearing in the junior 
and senior year schedules are reserved only for students who have satisfied 
core curriculum requirements and have been formally admitted into the School 
of Education and Psychology. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR 

Hours Credit 
Freshman Year 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

History 101, 102 8 

Mathematics 100 4 

Science 16 



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School of Education and Psychology 



Physical— FS 104 and 105—8 hours 

Biological— FS 106 and 107—8 hours 

(FS 104 is prerequisite to all sciences) 

Physical Education Activity Courses (3 non-credit courses) 

Art 107 4 

Military Science (men only) 3 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 or 433 8 

Music 165 or Art 120 4 

Health 179 4 

Public Address 101 or 301 4 

Social Science 12 

Political Science 101 — 4 hours 

Elect two different courses for 8 hours from: 

(A) Economics 200 or 251 

(B) Sociology 103 or 201 

(C) Geography 103 

Physical Education Activity Courses (3 non-credit courses) 

Psychology 201 (Sophomore year only) 4 

Education Foundations 300 (to be taken last quarter of 

sophomore year or first quarter junior year) 4 

Military Science (men only) 3 

Junior Year 

EED 301— Methods and Materials in Arithmetic 4 

EED 305— Social Studies in the Elementary Grades 4 

EED 306 — Language Arts in the Elementary School 4 

ART 309— Elementary School Art 4 

EED 309— Developing Skills in Reading 4 

EED 311 — Developmental Reading in the Elementary School 4 

EPY 316— Human Growth and Development, Pt. 1, Child 4 

EED 317 — Methods and Materials in Children's Literature 4 

MAT 318— Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers 4 

EPY 319— Educational Psychology 4 

Senior Year 

Hours Credit 

MED 361— Music for Elementary Teachers, I 4 

MED 362— Music for Elementary Teachers, II 4 

PE 409 — Physical Education in the Elementary School 4 

EED 412 — Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disabilitv 

for the Classroom Teacher 4 

FED 416— Audio -Visual Education 4 

SCE 432 — Science for Elementary Teachers 4 

FED 469— Tests and Measurements 4 

EED 480-482— Student Teaching in the Elementary Schools and 

EED 343, Methods and Materials in Elementary Education 16 

Total Hours 168 

Electives (including Military Science) 24 

Grand Total 192 



l 74 



Elementary Education 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION COURSES (EED) 

301— Methods and Materials in Arithmetic. Four hours. 

A course in the methods of teaching arithmetic in the elementary grades. 
Special attention is given to developing an understanding of numbers, teach- 
ing basic combinations, and the use of arithmetic textbooks and workbooks. 

305 — Social Studies in the Elementary Grades. Four hours. 

Social studies in the broad fields and core curriculum with emphasis on 
objectives and content. Areas, sequence of units, and the evaluation of social 
studies units for elementary grades is stressed. Preparation and presentation 
of a complete social studies unit is required. 

306 — Language Arts in the Elementary School. Four hours. 

A course dealing with the development of skills in writing, spelling, listen- 
ing, speaking, and related fields. 

309 — Developing Skills in Reading. Four hours. 

An undergraduate course which makes an intensive study of the skills re- 
quired in reading; methods and materials required to teach these skills; and 
classroom techniques for evaluating proficiency in the development of read- 
ing skills. 

311 — Developmental Reading in the Elementary School. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: EED 309. 

A study of reading as a growth process and as a developmental task; to 
include also the nature and principles of a developmental program with flexi- 
ble grouping. Consideration will be given to the slow-learner and the gifted 
child with regard to reading. 

317— Methods and Materials in Children's Literature. Four hours. 

Reading in mythology, legend, history, biography, fiction, and poetry. Nar- 
rative and dramatic presentation. Comparative editions, graded bibliographies, 
and standard practice in building collections of books for children. 

343 — Methods and Materials in Elementary Education. Four hours. 

An examination of materials and their relatedness to methods. Stresses ap- 
proved techniques in light of research in these fields: Language arts, social 
studies, number relationships, handwriting, spelling, science, health, and cre- 
ative experiences. Only offered concurrently with student teaching. 

403-G403 — Kindergarten -Primary Education. Four hours. 

A study of the contributions which group living makes to the mental and 
physical health of young children, with emphasis upon child development re- 
search in curricular experiences and records. Designed to help teacher and 
parents understand the readiness program. Laboratory is included. 

412 — Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disability for the Classroom 
Teacher. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: EED 311 or SED 311. 

This course deals with the need for corrective and remedial reading in 
the school; nature and causes of reading disability; procedure in making a 
classroom diagnosis, including interpretation of results; remedial treatment of 
reading difficulties to include techniques and materials; and some opportu- 
nity for testing and remedial teaching in the public schools. 

480 — Student Teaching in Lower Elementary. Twelve hours. 

Prerequisites: FED 300, EED 301, 305, 306, 309, 311, EPY 316, and SCE 432. 

Students arrange for this course with Director of Student Teaching two 
quarters in advance. (EED 343 — Methods and Materials in Elementary Educa- 
tion is concurrent with this course). 

482 — Student Teaching in Upper Elementary. Twelve hours. 

See statement under EED 480. 

489 — Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching. Eight hours. 



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School of Education and Psychology 



In-service student teaching designed for experienced teachers who have 
demonstrated their interest and ability as classroom teachers. Two years ex- 
perience as a teacher is required and enrollment will be limited to the summer 
quarter only. This course will deal with classroom management, programs of 
instruction, and student role in the educational environment. 

490 or G490 — Workshop in Aviation Education. Four hours. 

491 or G491 — The Reading Conference I, II, III. One and one-half hours 
each. 

An intensive program for five days during the summer quarter consisting 
of lectures, group discussion, and demonstration lessons. 

496 — Projects in Elementary Education I, II, III. Four hours. 

Designed for school systems planning local projects of curriculum revision 
and course of study construction. Available for credit more than once if proj- 
ects require more than one quarter to complete. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUIDANCE (GED) 

Herman Boroughs, Chairman 
Alcorn, Allen, Gutsch, Weatherford 

The Department of Guidance offers separate curricula at the graduate level 
to prepare candidates in three areas of personnel and guidance work. These 
areas are: (1) public school counselors, (2) college and junior college counselors, 
personnel workers and specialists, and (3) counselors, personnel workers, and 
specialists in community agencies. See the Graduate Bulletin for the course pat- 
terns of each curriculum mentioned. The Department of Guidance offers work 
leading to the M.Ed., M.S., Ed.S., Ed.D., or Ph.D. degrees. (Note: If included 
in a Master's degree, the GED courses 506, 522, 571, 581, 582, 587, 593 I, II or 
600 will meet Mississippi State Department of Education's academic require- 
ments for certification as a school counselor.) 

DEPARTMENT OF 
HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 

C. E. McCarver, Chairman 

Instructors: Alexander, M. Brown, Falsone, Grantham, Hennington, M. C. 
Johnson, McCarver, McDavid, Martin, Milam, Myers, Nesbitt, Slay, Switzer, 

Terry, Thompson, Townley, Yarrow. 
Varsity Coaches: Berry, Clark, Cook, Floyd, Green, Harrington, Lambright, 

Poole, Taylor, Underwood, Vann, Van Hook. 

Specialists in Therapy: E. A. Hiller, Director, Biloxi Veterans Administration 

Center; E. L. Maddry, M.D.; W. B. Hawkins, M.D.; S. A. Chavez, M.D.; 

K. M. Clements, M.D.; R. A. Parrish; O. W. Stringer. 

The program for the Department of Health, Physical Education, and Rec- 
reation is designed to meet the following objectives: (1) to promote the health 
and fitness of university students; (2) to provide information and a scientific 
basis for the formation of sound health attitudes and habits; (3) to offer op- 
portunities for recreation; (4) to prepare teachers, coaches, health educators, 
supervisors, administrators, recreation directors, and other specialists in the 
field of school and community health, safety, physical education, and recrea- 
tion. 

The Department emphasizes the close relationship of health, physical edu- 
cation, and recreation. Students majoring in the Department are expected to 
acquire an understanding of this relationship to enrich whatever area of spe- 
cial concentration they may eventually select. 



l7 6 



Recreation 



REQUIRED PROGRAM 

Non-credit physical education activity courses are required of all students 
during the freshman and sophomore years: one course each quarter for six 
quarters (excluding the summer quarter). Marching band members, Dixie 
Darlings, and Pom Pons will be excused from this requirement during 
one quarter each year of participation. Varsity athletes will be excused from 
this requirement while participating in varsity sports. Non-credit activity 
courses may not be repeated. Students are required to have suitable uniforms 
as determined by the Department. 

The required non-credit activity courses for men are: 

Freshman Year: Fall Quarter Winter Quarter Spring Quarter 

PE 43M PE 44M PE 45M 

Sophomore Year: Fall Quarter Winter Quarter Spring Quarter 

PE 57M PE 58M PE 59M 

The required non-credit activity courses for women are: 

Freshman Year: Fall Quarter Winter Quarter Spring Quarter 

PE 43W PE 44W PE 45W 

Sophomore Year: Fall Quarter Winter Quarter Spring Quarter 

Non-credit Non-credit Non-credit 

elective elective elective 

DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 

Bachelor of Science Professional Degree in Health and Physical Education 

The major in Health and Physical Education for the Bachelor of Science 
Professional degree requires 44 quarter hours with a minimum of 22 hours 
in health, and the remainder of the 44 hour requirement in physical educa- 
tion above the Basic College core and professional requirements (see certifi- 
cation requirements). 

Recommended courses in major include: * 

Health 482 (prerequisite Biology 228 and 229), 484 

Physical Education 412, 405, 406. 

♦Recreation 440 is recommended for Health and Physical Education majors. 

ALTERNATE CORRECTIVE THERAPY CURRICULUM LEADING 

TO A NONPROFESSIONAL DEGREE 

IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Recommended courses: 
Biology 228, 229 
Health 179, 452, 482, 485 
Physical Education 379, 401, 412 
Psychology 337, 445, 481 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN RECREATION 

Departmental Requirements: 

Recreation 420, 430, 433, 440, 445, 450, 469, 470, 474, 481, 488. 
A minor from areas related to recreation, selected with the approval 
of the major adviser. Among the related areas are: 



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School of Education and Psychology 



(1) Sports and Games: individual and group (Physical Education) 

(2) Dance: folk, square, modern, social (Physical Education) 

(3) Arts and crafts: painting, ceramics, woodwork, leathercraft, 
photography (Fine Arts and Industrial Arts) 

(4) Industrial Arts: building construction (Industrial Arts) 

(5) Music: appreciation, fundamentals, recreational (Music) 

(6) Dramatics: public address, theatre (Communication, Theatre) 

(7) Administrative: personnel and office management, accounting, 
economics, marketing (Business Administration) 

(8) Sociology: urban and rural, social problems, family and delinquency 
problems, social work methods, social institutions (Sociology) 

(9) Psychology: applied, social, abnormal, industrial (Psychology) 

(10) Political Science: public administration; municipal, county, and 
state government (Political Science) 

(11) Philosophy: introduction, logic, ethics (Philosophy) 

(12) Education: guidance, special, audio-visual (Education) 
Students may concentrate in one of several special areas within the broad 

field of Recreation: Recreation Leadership, Municipal Administration, Park 
Management, Camping and Outdoor Education, Agency Administration, Church 
Recreation, College Recreation, Hospital or Institutional Recreation, Military 
Recreation, Industrial and Commercial Recreation. Although course require- 
ments within the Department are essentially the same for all specific areas, 
students will be guided into programs of elective courses according to their 
areas of concentration. 

DEPARTMENTAL MINORS 

Minor in Health and Physical Education With Emphasis in Dance 

A minor in Health and Physical Education with emphasis in dance may be 
obtained by completing 28 hours in Ballet, Tap, Modern, Social, Folk, Square 
Dance, and related areas. 

Minor in Health and Physical Education With Emphasis in Health 

This minor may be obtained by completing the following requirements: 

Health 179, 333, 335, 425, 437, 485, and electives to equal 28 hours. 
Minor in Health and Physical Education With Emphasis in Physical Education 

This minor may be obtained by completing the following requirements: 

Physical Education 379, 405, 411, 412 

Physical Education — men — 402, 410, and electives to equal 28 hours. 

Physical Education — women — 314, 400, and electives to equal 28 hours. 

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

All health, physical education, and recreation majors are encouraged to 
acquire certificates in the following areas: 

Driver Education Instructor 

Issued by the University of Southern Mississippi for the Mississippi State 

Department of Education and the American Automobile Association 

(HTH 333, 335, 437, and HTH 453) 
Swimming and Water Safety 

Senior Life Saving and Water Safety 

Issued by the University of Southern Mississippi for the American Red 

Cross (PE 403) 
Water Safety Instructor 

Issued by the University of Southern Mississippi for the American Red 

Cross on completion of Life Saving and Water Safety Requirements and 

PE 404 



I7 8 



Health 



First Aid 
First Aid Certificate 

Issued by the University of Southern Mississippi for the American Red 
Cross (HTH 333) 
First Aid Instructor's Certificate 
Issued by the University of Southern Mississippi for the American Red 
Cross on completion of requirements for Standard First Aid Certificate 
and HTH 343 

Instructor in Marksmanship 

Issued by the University of Southern Mississippi for the National Rifle 
Asociation of America (REC 382) 
Corrective Therapy Certificate 
Certificate in Corrective Therapy issued on completion of therapy training 
and satisfactorily passing the examination by the American Board for 
Certification of Corrective Therapists. 

HEALTH COURSES (HTH) 

127 — Community Health. Four hours. 

Community control of environmental health hazards, community control 
of disease; health agencies. 

179 — Personal Health. Four hours. 

The human body and its function as related to problems of health and 
disease. 

333— First Aid. Two hours. 

Standard first aid as approved by the American Red Cross. Emphasis on 
preparing students in the knowledge and skills needed in preventing accidents 
as well as rendering first aid to the victim of accidents and sudden illness. 

335 — Safety Education. Two hours. 

A study of the general program of safety education in public schools, with 
special reference to the selection and knowledge of materials, including 
methods and techniques of instruction: visual aids, safety projects, special 
programs, and the utilization of new methods of civil defense. 

343 — Advanced and Instructor First Aid. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: HTH 333. 

An advanced study certifying personnel to conduct first aid courses in 
schools and community, and new methods of civil defense. 

425— Problems of Child Health. Four hours. 

Child safety, nutrition, diseases of children, mental health of children, 
growth. 

431 — Sanitation. Four hours. 

Problems of sanitation in the home and school, in food, producing and 
handling, water supply, waste and excreta disposal. Based on an understanding 
of general biology. 

437 or G437 — Introduction to Driver Education. Four hours. 

Critical analysis of traffic accidents, attitude factors, essential knowledge 
of automobile operation, and traffic law and regulations. Includes introduction 
of laboratory experiences in the use of psychophysical testing and in the 
development of driving skills. 

452 or G452 — Physiology of Exercise. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: BIO 229. 

A study of the physiological changes which occur in the body during 
muscular activity. 

453-G453 — Methods of Driver and Traffic Safety Education. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: HTH 437. 

Methods and techniques to develop competence in transferring knowledge 
t.nd skill as well as inspiring satisfactory attitudes. Organization and adminis- 



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School of Education and Psychology 



tration of the program, including scheduling, financing, and developing good 
public relations. 

454 — Health Education in Elementary Schools. Four hours. 

Methods and materials for the elementary teacher, with special emphasis 
on instruction and on coordination of school and community health programs. 

455- — Health Education in Secondary Schools. Four hours. 

Primarily for students majoring or minoring in health and physical edu- 
cation. Materials and techniques for high school teachers of health; conducting 
the school health program at the secondary level. 

482 or G482 — Kinesiology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 228. 

Analysis of movement based on a knowledge of anatomy and physiology 
as applied to the function of muscles in body mechanics. 

483— School Health. Four hours. 

Organization and operation of school health program, with emphasis on 
policies, procedures, problems, cooperating agencies, and field work. 

484 or G484 — Evaluation in Health and Physical Education. Four hours. 

Administration and interpretation of tests in health, physical fitness, and 
skills. 

485 — Marriage and Family Life. Four hours. 

Physical, emotional, and medical basis for successful courtship, marriage, 
and parenthood. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES (PE) 
300— Varsity-Football. One hour. 
301 — Varsity -Basketball. One hour. 
302— Varsity-Baseball. One hour. 
303— Varsity-Track and Field. One hour. 
304 — Varsity-Tennis. One hour. 
305— Varsity-Golf. One hour. 
312— Softball for Women. One hour. 
313 — Soccer and Speedball for Women. One hour. 
314— Officiating Team Sports for Women. Four hours. 

Development of personal skills and officiating techniques in team sports. 
315— Stunts and Tumbling for Women. One hour. 

317— Techniques of Teaching Stunts, Tumbling, and Apparatus. Two hours. 
320— Women's Basketball. One hour. 
321— Volleyball. One hour. 

322— Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. Two hours. 
326 — Badminton. One hour. 
328 — Archery. One hour. 
330— Golf. One hour. 
341 — Square Dancing. One hour. 
342— Folk, Contra, and Round Dances. One hour. 
349 — Bowling. One hour. 
351 — Modern Dance. One hour. 

Emphasis on beginning techniques and movement fundamentals. 
352— Intermediate Modern Dance. One hour. 
Prerequisite: PE 351 or by permission of instructor. 
353 — Advanced Modern Dance. One hour. 
Prerequisite: PE 352 or by permission of instructor. 



180 



Physical Education 



354 — Composition. One hour. 

Prerequisite: PE 353 or by permission of instructor. 

355 — Advanced Composition. One hour. 

Prerequisite: PE 354 or by permission of instructor. 

356 — Techniques of Production and Performance in Dance. One hour. 

Prerequisite: PE 355 or by permission of the instructor. 

363 — Swimming. One hour. 

365 — Tennis. One hour. 

367 — Gymnastics. One hour. 

371 — Social Dancing. One hour. 

373— Coaching Football. Two hours. 

Player selection, fundamentals, training, and game strategy. 

374 — Coaching Basketball. Two hours. 

The growth and popularity of basketball, selection, practice and training 
of players, offensive and defensive strategy. 

375 — Coaching Baseball. Two hours. 

A study of the background and development of baseball, coaching of the 
fundamentals, player selection and placement, and other coaching problems. 

376— Coaching Track and Field. Two hours. 

Selecting of personnel, fundamentals and training techniques. 

378 — History of Physical Education. Two hours. 

379 — Introduction to Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. Four hours. 

A survey of the areas of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. 

380— Conducting Drill Team. Two hours. 

381 — Markmanship. One hour. 

382— Ballet I. One hour. 

383— Ballet II. One hour. 

Prerequisite: Ballet I or by permission of instructor. 

384— Ballet III. One hour. 

Prerequisite: Ballet II or by permission of instructor. 

385— Ballet IV. One hour. 

Prerequisite: Ballet III or by permission of instructor. 

386— Ballet V. One hour. 

Prerequisite: Ballet IV or by permission of instructor. 

387— Ballet VI. One hour. 

Prerequisite: Ballet V or by permission of instructor. 

390 — Modern Jazz I. One hour. 

Prerequisite: Ballet or Modern Dance experience. 

392 — Acrobatics I. One hour. 

394— Tap I. One hour. 

397A, 397B, 397C— Ballet Workshop. One hour each. 

398A, 398B, 398C— Modern Dance Workshop. One hour each. 

399 — Techniques of Teaching Ballet and Modern Dance. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: All Ballet and Modern Dance courses. 

400 — Officiating Individual and Dual Sports for Women. Four hours. 

Development of personal skills and officiating techniques in individual 
and dual sports. 

401-G401 — Preventive and Corrective Physical Education. Four hours. 

Recognition of and corrective exercises for functional abnormalities. 

402— Techniques of Officiating Sports for Men. Four hours. 

Personal skills and officiating techniques of varsity sports. 

403 — Life Saving and Water Safety. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Proficiency in swimming. 



181 



School of Education and Psychology 



American Red Cross Senior Life Saving Certificate awarded upon course 
completion. 

404 — Water Safety Instructor's Course. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Life Saving and Water Safety. 

Emphasis on knowledge and skills beyond the scope of Senior Life Saving 
and certifying personnel to conduct water safety courses in schools and com- 
munities. 

405, 406, 407 — Coaching the Minor Sports. (Beginning, Intermediate, and 

Advanced). Two hours each. 

Experiences in the various phases of intramurals and physical education 
activity programs. 

408-G408— Techniques of Teaching Rhythms. Two hours. 

Practical experience in group instruction in various areas of dance. 

409 — Physical Education in Elementary Schools. Four hours. 

Materials and methods in the elementary grades; both theory and practical 
experiences in selecting, organizing, and directing activities for the elementary 
school. 

410 — Physical Education in Secondary Schools for Men. Four hours. 

Developing personal skills in individual, dual, and team sports for men. 

411 — Theory of Teaching Swimming and Diving. Two hours. 

Organization and administration of the community swimming program, 
including pool operation, maintenance, and sanitation. 

412 — Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Education. 
Four hours. 

The theory and procedure in adopting policies and programs necessary 
to the development and administration of a sound health and physical edu- 
cation program. 

423 — History of Dance. Two hours. 

A survey of dance in various civilizations from prehistoric times to the 
present. 

RECREATION COURSES (REC) 

382 — Marksmanship. Two hours. 

Instructor's course in marksmanship as certified by the National Rifle 
Association. 

420 — History and Principles of Recreation. Four hours. 

The history, principles, and values of recreation. The contributions and 
responsibilities of the many organizations active in the field are described. 

430 — Outdoor Education and Recreation. Four hours. 

Designed to acquaint recreation leaders, teachers, and administrators with 
the values, programs, opportunities, and relationships of outdoor education 
and recreation. 

433 — Camp Counseling and Administration of Camping. Two hours. 

Development of skills in camp leadership and administration. 

440 — Recreational Leadership Theory. Four hours. 

Developing individual competency in leading recreational activities. 

445 — Social Recreation Programming. Two hours. 

Planning, programming, and conducting of social recreation activities. 

450 — Youth Service Programs. Four hours. 

Administration, organization, and leadership of youth-serving organizations 
in the community, and the relationship of youth-service programs to the total 
community recreation activity. 

469 — Recreational Skills. Four hours. 

Adapting different craft media for use in recreation programs: making 
game equipment, stage properties, decorations, hobbies, and other crafts. 



i8:l 



Industrial Arts 



470 — Park and Recreation Areas and Facilities. Four hours. 

Presenting to the professional recreation worker the fundamental princi- 
ples, standards, and techniques in the design, construction, and mainten- 
ance of park and recreation areas and facilities. 

474 — Community Centers and Playgrounds. Four hours. 

The specific problems and programs unique to recreation centers and play- 
grounds, emphasizing techniques for administration and operation. 

481 — Introduction to Administration of Recreation Service. Four hours. 

A study of official, voluntary, and private organizations for recreation, 
with special consideration of legal aspects, personnel, facilities, financing, and 
public relations. 

488 — Field Work in Recreation. Four to twelve hours. 

A supervised course designed to give the professional recreation student 
practical experience in developing skills in various recreation programs. 

THERAPY COURSES (THY) 

301— Research I, II, III. One hour. 

Research in the area of rehabilitation theory and its application. 

421 — Clinical Experience. One to six hours. (May be repeated). 

Lectures and supervised internship in various rehabilitation theories and 
their application. 

431, 432, 433 — Rehabilitation Theory and Application. Four hours each. 

Lectures, directed clinical work, and research in rehabilitation theory and 
its application. 

441, 442, 443 — Psychology of Rehabilitation. Four hours each. 

The approach to rehabilitation as it involves the individual in the mental 
and physical phases of readjustment. 

453 — Supervision of Therapy and its Application. Twelve hours. 

METHODS COURSE 

SED 451P— Methods and Principles in Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation. Four hours. 

For grades 1 through 12. Primarily for students majoring or minoring in 
health, physical education, and recreation. Materials and techniques of teach- 
ing health, physical education, and recreation in public schools. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS (LA) 

Zed H. Burns, Chairman 
Crowder, Hunter, Salinas, Thomas 

The Department of Industrial Arts offers a choice of three undergraduate 
curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science degree: (1) the Industrial Arts 
teaching major; (2) the Industrial Technology major; and (3) the Archi- 
tectural Technology major. For graduate work in the Department, consult the 
Graduate Bulletin. 

The major for students who plan to teach Industrial Arts requires 45 hours, 
with the minimum hours in each area as shown below: 

General Shop — 4 hours Drawing — 9 hours 

Metal Work — 9. hours Industrial Arts electives — 14 hours 

Woodwork — 9 hours 

The Industrial Technology major requires 36 hours. With this non-teaching 
major the student is encouraged to minor in some related technical field, such 
as mathematics, physics, chemistry, or management. 

A minor in Industrial Arts requires 28 hours. 

The Department also offers a four-year curriculum in Architectural Tech- 
nology. The first two years of this curriculum can serve as pre-professional 
training for students planning to become professional architects. 



*3 



School of Education and Psychology 



In the field of Industrial Arts, double majors are impractical and are 
strongly discouraged. 



CURRICULUM RECOMMENDED FOR 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS TEACHING MAJOR 



Fall Hrs. 

ENG 101 4 

HIS 101 4 

HTH 179 4 

IA 131 3 

PE Activity 



Freshman Year 
Winter Hrs. 

ENG 102 4 

HIS 102 4 

MAT 100, or 101 .... 4 

PS 4 

PE Activity 



Spring Hrs. 

ENG 103 4 

PA 101 4 

Soc. Sci. Elective 4 

IA 121 3 

PE Activity 



ROTC 



1 ROTC 1 ROTC 



16 



Fall Hrs. 

ENG 201 4 

BIO 101 4 

PSY 201 4 

IA 122 3 

PE Activity 

ROTC 1 



17 

Sophomore Year 
Winter Hrs. 

BIO 102 4 

IA 321, or 350 3 

IA 136 4 

IA 330 3 

PE Activity 

ROTC 1 



16 



Spring Hrs. 

IA 301 4 

Physical Science 4 

IA 331 3 

IA 341 3 

PE Activity 

ROTC 1 



16 



Fall Hrs. 

EPY 319 4 

FED 300 4 

IA 314 3 

Physical Sci 4 



15 

Junior Year 
Winter Hrs. 

EPY 332 4 

IA 340 3 

IA 315 3 

SED 462 or 464 2 

Elective 2 

ENG 202 or 433 4 



15 



Spring Hrs. 

IA 342 : 3 

Electives 10 

Fine Arts 4 



15 



Fall Hrs. 

IA 400 5 

FED. 469 4 

Elective . , 5 



18 

Senior Year 
Winter Hrs. Spring 

IA 401 5 SED 481G 

Elective 8 SED 313 . 

SED 451G 4 



17 

Hrs. 

..12 
... 4 



14 



17 



16 



CURRICULUM RECOMMENDED FOR 
ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY MAJOR 



Fall Hrs. 

ART 111 4 

ENG 101 4 

MAT 101 4 

HIS 101 4 



Freshman Year 
Winter Hrs. 

ART 112 4 

ENG 102 4 

MAT 102 4 

HIS 102 4 



Spring Hrs. 

ART 113 4 

ENG 103 4 

MAT 103 4 

Elective 4 



ROTC 1 ROTC ..' 1 ROTC 1 



17 



17 



17 



184 



Industrial Arts 



Fall Hrs. 

MAT 171 4 

PHY 101 5 

ART 101 4 

Arch. Design I 4 

ROTC 1 



Sophomore Year 
Winter Hrs. 

MAT 276 4 

PHY 102 5 

ART 321 4 

Arch. Design II 
ROTC 1 



Spring Hrs. 

MAT 277 4 

PHY 103 5 

ART 341 4 

Arch. Design III 4 

ROTC 1 



18 



18 



18 



Fall Hrs. 

Arch. Design IV 4 

Structures I 5 

Elective 4 

ENG 201 4 

17 



Junior Year 
Winter Hrs. 

Arch. Design V 4 

Structures II 5 

PA 101 4 

ENG 202 4 

17 



Spring Hrs. 

Arch. Design VI 4 

Structures III 5 

PS 101 4 

ENG (Elec.) 4 

17 



Fall Hrs. 

Arch. Design VII 4 

Build. Const. I 2 

Elective 10 



Senior Year 
Winter Hrs. 

Arch. Design VIII 4 

Build. Const. II 2 

Elective 10 



Spring Hrs. 

Arch. Design IX 4 

Build. Const, m 2 

Elective 10 



16 



16 



16 



Electives must be selected so as to meet all requirements for graduation 
including the core, major, minor, hours numbered 300 or above, and total hours. 
Normally the B.S. degree is granted on the basis of the above curriculum; 
however, the A.B. degree may be earned in this field if all requirements are 
met including two years of French. 



CURRICULUM RECOMMENDED FOR 
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY MAJOR 



Fall Hrs. 

ENG 101 4 

HIS 101 4 

Elective 4 

IA 121 3 



Freshman Year 

Winter Hrs. 

ENG 102 4 

HIS 102 4 

MAT 4 

IA 122 3 



Spring Hrs. 

ENG 103 4 

PA 101 4 

Soc. Sci. Elective 4 

IA 131 3 



ROTC 



1 ROTC 1 ROTC 



16 



16 



16 



Fall Hrs. 

ENG 201 4 

Lab. Science 4 

Soc. Sci. Elective 4 

IA 321 3 

ROTC 1 

16 



Sophomore Year 

Winter Hrs. 

MAT 4 

ENG 202 4 

IA 350 3 

Lab. Science 4 

ROTC 1 

16 



Spring Hrs. 

PSY 201 4 

Lab. Science 4 

IA 331 3 

PS 4 

ROTC 1 

16 



*5 



School of Education and Psychology 







Junior Year 








Fall 

IA 342 

Elective 

Fine Arts 


Hrs. 

3 

8 

4 


Winter 

IA 340 

Elective 


Hrs. 

... 3 
...12 


Spring 

IA 314 

Elective 


Hrs. 

3 
12 




15 


Senior Year 


15 




15 


Fall 

Elective 


Hrs. 

17 


Winter 

Elective 


Hrs. 

...17 


Spring 

Elective 


Hrs. 

17 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS COURSES (IA) 

121 — Engineering Drawing I. Three hours. 

Use of drawing instruments, geometric construction. Conventions used in 
depicting objects for reproduction. Representation in two and three dimensions. 
Object drawing. Special practice in lettering. Orthographic projection, dimen- 
sioning. 

122 — Engineering Drawing II. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: I A 121. 

Multiview projection, sectional views, auxiliary views, revolutions, work- 
ing drawings, pictorial drawings. 

131 — Woodwork. Three hours. 

A course designed to develop skill, knowledge and appreciation in the care 
and use of woodworking tools, materials, processes, and products. Hand and 
machine tools, tool processes, wood and lumber, joints, gluing, nails and screws, 
wood turning, and finishing. 

136 — General Shop. Four hours. 

A general course in accordance with the modern development of in- 
dustrial arts and crafts. 

300 — Industrial Arts Design. Three hours. 

A basic course in design with special emphasis on industrial arts use. 
Such topics as texture, form, balance, stability and free-form are included. 

301 — Industrial Arts Electricity. Four hours. 

An introduction to some phases of electricity such as magnetism, bell wir- 
ing, bell transformers, repair of electrical appliances, sources of electrical 
energy, house wiring, and generators and motors. 

305 — Power Mechanics I. Three hours. 

Small engine operation, design and care. Ignition, carburetion, displace- 
ment, compression ratios, camshaft and valve design are among the topics 
considered. 

310 — Bookbinding. Three hours. 

A complete course in hand binding. Included are stripping and collating, 
sewing, backing and gluing, case making, titling, and finishing. 

314 — Leather Craft. Three hours. 

Instruction in tooling, embossing, lacing, and designing selected leather 
projects. 

315— Plastics. Three hours. 

A study of plastics in common use; general operations in design, shaping 
and finishing selected projects. 

317 — Photography in Industrial Arts. Three hours. 

Evaluation of photography in the industrial arts curriculum. Camera selec- 
tion, construction, and techniques, exposure factors, film characteristics and 
selection, developing, printing, enlarging, copying and other basic darkroom 
procedures. The making of photographic slides for industrial arts, both black 
and white, and color. 



186 



Industrial Arts 



319 — Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers. Four hours. 

A course for teachers of both lower and upper elementary work. Intended 
as an aid to the teacher in her preparation to guide the children in all free 
activities. Not open to Industrial Arts majors except by special permission. 

321 — Engineering Drawing III. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: LA 121 and 122. 

Use of instruments, engineering lettering, freehand sketches, pictorial draw- 
ings, sectional views, and working drawings from written descriptions as well 
as from actual objects. 

322 — Engineering Drawing IV. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: IA 121, 122, and 321. 

Advanced Engineering Drawing. 

325 — Descriptive Geometry. Five hours. 

Prerequisite: I A 121. 

A study of the general principles of descriptive geometry and their appli- 
cation to engineering, architecture, and geology. 

330— Wood Finishing. Three hours. 

A general course in wood finishing consisting of finishing materials, tech- 
niques, and equipment, applicable to industrial arts projects. 

331 — Advanced Woodwork. Three hours. 

Emphasis on the selection of projects to implement the objectives of an 
industrial arts program. The importance of individual design and use of ma- 
chines is stressed. 

340— Welding. Three hours. 

Theory and practice in oxy-acetylene and arc welding. Construction of 
appropriate projects is required. 

341— Sheet Metal Work. Three hours. 

An introduction to the application of hand and machine processes. Simple 
pattern drafting. Study of materials. Working cold iron; cutting, forming, seam- 
ing, burring, crimping, and fastening, as applied to the making of sheet metal 
products. 

342 — Machine Shop. Three hours. 

Introduction to the procedures in grinding; thread cutting; quick change 
gears; the drill press and its operation; taper turning; cutting tools; grinding 
machines; and the assembling of machine parts. 

343— Art Metal Work. Three hours. 

An introduction to the processes involved in the construction, finish, and 
evaluation of art metal projects and articles: class demonstrations, assigned 
readings, and special reports. 

350 — Architectural Drawing. Three hours. 

A beginning course in architectural drawing. Lettering, details, working 
drawings, and office practice. 

351-2-3 — Architectural Design I, II, III. Four hours each. 

Analysis and solution of simple problems in architectural design. Emphasis 
on domestic and simple public buildings. Attention to construction and finish 
details through research, discussion, drawing and models. Three quarters of 
architectural design. 

375 — Structures I. Five hours. 

Prerequisites: PHY 101 or 201 and MAT 103. 

An elementary technical study of force systems and their action on rigid 
bodies at rest. Topics considered are center of gravity, moment of inertia of 
areas. For architectural and engineering students. 

376 — Structures II. Five hours. 

Analysis of fundamental structural principles, application of mathematics 
of structural theory. 



i8 7 



School of Education and Psychology 



377— Structurtes III. Five hours. 

Study of statically determined structures including shear and bending 
moments, torsion, slope and deflection, design of beams, columns, trusses, struts, 
problems dealing with wood, reinforced concrete, steels, and other materials. 

381, 382, 383— Building Construction I, II, III. Two hours each. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Study and examination of materials and methods of construction. Founda- 
tions, walls, roofs, stairs, partitions, doors, windows, etc., are studied. Also 
considered are specifications, contracts, and office practice. 

400 — School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection. Five hours. 

Lay out of rooms and other building facilities. Purchase and arrangement 
of equipment. Selection of suitable equipment for special conditions. The cost 
of equipment, supplies, and maintenance. 

401 — Shop Care and Management. Five hours. 

A study of machine placement; student movement; arrangement of safety 
zones; upkeep and repair of tools; tool storage and distribution; storage of 
materials; assembly areas; and the general appearance of the shop. 

409 — History and Philosophy of Industrial Arts. Five hours. 
A critical consideration of various points of view; important contributions 
to general education; philosophy of industrial arts education, and leaders. 

451-2-3 — Architectural Design IV, V, VI. Three quarters of Architectural 
Design. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: Architectural Design I, II, III. 

Analysis and solution of architectural problems of greater complexity than 
the 350 series. Emphasis is on presentation of ideas in design. 

454, 455, 456— Architectural Design VII, VIII, IX. 

Three quarters of architectural design. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: Architectural Design 453. 

Analysis and solution of problems in architectural design of moderate com- 
plexity. Attention is given to site planning, landscape design, etc., through 
lectures, slides, drawing, and research. 

DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE (LS) 

Warren F. Tracy, Chairman 

deGrummond, Flynt 

A student majoring in Library Science may elect one of several alternate 
plans. He may work toward either the B.A., the B.S. non-teaching, or the B.S. 
teaching degree. The student's choice of program should be determined by his 
plans for the future and in close conjunction with his adviser. 

Students wishing to prepare for positions in the public, college and univer- 
sity, and special library fields should major in an academic subject (other than 
Library Science) at the undergraduate level, take the 20 quarter hour pre- 
requisite of undergraduate library science courses (see Graduate Bulletin), and 
complete the Master's program in Library Science. Students who are planning 
to study librarianship should consult the chairman of the Department of Li- 
brary Science for advice regarding their curricula. 

Curriculum for Bachelor of Science 

Degree with a Major in Library Science 

(Professional Teaching Program) 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Courses listed in Basic College core and School of Education and Psychology 
requirements. 



188 



Library Science 



Junior and Senior Years 

Hours 

Library Science 301, 302, 303, and 315-316 20 

Library Science 427, 428, 462 and 463 16 

FED 300, FED 416, FED 469, SED 313*, and SED 481R 28 

Educational Psychology 319 and 332 8 

Fine Arts 4 

Electives 27 

♦Prerequisite: EPY 319 

SED 313 and SED 481R are taken concurrently. 

The Bachelor of Science degree with Library Science as a major may be 
had in the non-teaching program and may follow the library science require- 
ments for the B.A. degree. 

Curriculum for Bachelor of Arts 

Degree with a Major in Library Science 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Courses listed in Basic College core and School of Education and Psychology 

requirements. 

Junior and Senior Years 

Hours 

Library Science 301, 302, 303 12 

Library Science 427, 428, 462, 463 and 489 21 

Foundations Education 416 4 

Electives and minor 60 

Departmental Requirements 

General requirements: The student wishing to major in Library Science 
should take 37 hours in the Department of Library Science, all of which must 
be in courses numbered above 300. Required of all majors and counted as a 
library science course is FED 416. 

No correspondence or extension work is counted toward this credit. For the 
B.S. teaching degree 12 hours of directed teaching will be in school library 
practice, SED 481R. The B.A. and non-teaching B.S. may include LS 489 
instead. FED 416 will be counted toward the major in Library Science, provided 
it is done in residence. 

Minor and Electives 

In addition to the core requirements, the certification requirements and the 
departmental requirements, the student must also complete the requirements 
for a minor, preferably in a related field. Courses not used to fulfill any of these 
requirements are free electives and may be taken in any department of the 
University. 

The student minoring in Library Science must take 28 hours in the Depart- 
ment. 

Students may qualify for the Class A Certificate by completing at least 36 
quarter hours of Library Science. Students may qualify for a permit by com- 
pleting Library Science 302, 303, 315, and 316. 

Qtr. Hrs. 

Books and Related Materials for Children and Young People 8 

Organization and Administration of Libraries 8 

Electives in Library Science 20 

Elementary School Librarian 

It is recommended that persons interested in entering the elementary 
school library field follow the curriculum listed below. The State of Mississippi 
has made provision for separate certification of elementary school librarians. 
This program meets the requirements for certification of the office of Teacher 
Education, Certification and Placement. 



189 



School of Education and Psychology 



Freshman and Sophomore Years 
Basic College Core and School of Education and Psychology Requirements 

Junior and Senior Years 

Hours 

LS 301, 302, 315 and 316 16 

LS 427, 428, 462 and 463, FED 416 20 

FED 300, EED 305 8 

EED 306, EED 309, EED 343, EED 480 32 

EPY 316 4 

Fine Arts 4 

Electives 27 

LIBRARY SCIENCE COURSES (LS) 

301 — Book Selection. Four hours. 

A general study of principles of selection and standards for evaluation of 
books, periodicals and other library materials; book publishers, series and 
editions; use of standard book selection aids. 

302 — Books and Related Materials for Children. Four hours. 

A study of library materials and their uses for children of preschool age 
through the elementary grades; emphasis on the examination of both printed 
and audio-visual materials. 

303 — Books and Related Materials for Young People. Four hours. 

A study of the reading needs and interests of adolescents with criteria for 
selecting books for the school library. Emphasis on a wide study of both books 
and allied materials. 

315 — Organization and Administration of School Libraries. Four hours. 

A study of the technical processes involved in organizing a library, circula- 
tion, classification and cataloguing; care of collection; maintenance of library 
materials, library quarters and equipment, finance, the acquisition of books and 
non-book materials. 

316 — Organization and Administration of School Libraries. Four hours. 
Continuation of LS 315. To be taken concurrently with LS 315. 
NOTE: FED 416 may be counted as Library Science. For description, see 
Department of Educational Foundations. 

427 — School Library Reference Materials. Four hours. 

Required for the 28-hour program and above. 

The study and evaluation of basic reference materials for school library use 

428 — School Library Reference Materials. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: LS 427. Not required on 28-hour program. 
A study of the more specialized reference material, including bibliographic 
and government materials, lectures, and problems. 

462 — Classification and Cataloguing. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: LS 315, 316 and 427. 

A study of the fundamental principles and methods of classification and 
cataloguing suitable for the average school library situation. Dewey Decimal 
Classification and simplified cataloguing with emphasis on the printed cards 
and other aids. 

463 — Classification and Cataloguing. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: LS 462. 

Expansion of the principles and methods of classification and cataloguing 
with attention given to more advanced problems. 

489 — Practice Work. Five hours. 



190 



Psychology 



Culmination course of majors in Library Science to be taken, with B.S. 
non-teaching degree. Experience in various phases of library work. Approxi- 
mately 180 hours of laboratory work. 

490 — School Library Problems. One and one-half hours each. 

An intensive course through group study in the analysis of special problems 
in the library field. Full-time work for five days, offered during the summer 
quarter; to be conducted through the cooperative efforts of the Department of 
Library Science and the State Department of Education. May be taken three 
times. 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) 

Including Educational Psychology (EPY), Special Education (SPE), 
and Human Relations (HUB) 

Ray S. Musgrave, Chairman 

Baker, Barker, Basham, Christensen, Gough, Hildman, Huckabee, Lowe, Lucy, 

Mehearg, Norsworthy, Rabin, Stritch, Ward 

The Department of Psychology offers a full range of courses in Psychology 
in either of two major sequences: general and pre-professional. It also func- 
tions as a service department in teacher-education, offering certain courses 
required for teacher certification. The Department also offers courses for other 
schools and departments which require or recommend courses in Psychology 
in their respective curricula. For graduate programs consult the Graduate 
Bulletin. 

Requirements for Major 

A student majoring in Psychology may elect one of several alternative 
plans. He may work toward either the B.S. or the B.A. degree. In each degree 
program he may follow either the pre-professional major sequence, or he may 
elect the general major program. The student's choice of program should be 
determined by his plans for the future. A major consists of thirty -six hours of 
Psychology, including Educational Psychoolgy. 

General Psychology Major 

This major is provided for the student who is interested in Psychology and 
who plans to enter an occupation other than professional psychology. The stu- 
dent who elects this major will not be recommended for professional work in 
Psychology or for graduate professional training. Students aspiring to ad- 
vanced professional training in Psychology should take the pre-professional 
sequences. , 

Pre -Professional Psychology Major 

This major sequence is planned to provide the student with the background 
and skills essential for graduate professional training in Psychology. 

A. Curriculum — Basic College and School Requirements 

The student working toward either degree must include the appropriate 
core curriculum requirements for his degree. 

Students who contemplate advanced graduate work are reminded that a 
reading knowledge of two foreign languages is usually required. Study of 
German or French is recommended as a part of the undergraduate program 
for pre-professional psychology majors. Bachelor of Arts students will take one 
of these languages to meet core requirements. 

B. Curriculum — Departmental Requirements 

1. General and Specific Requirements. 

The student wishing to major in Psychology, regardless of his degree plan, 
must take 36 hours in the Department of Psychology. Required of all majors 
are PSY 201, 302, 450, 466 or 467, and 484. 



I 9 I 



School of Education and Psychology 



The student taking the pre -professional psychology major should take, in 
addition to PSY 201, 302, 450, 466 or 467, and 484, as indicated above, PSY 445, 
451, 482, and one course from the group 337, 480, or 481. 

Courses designated EPY may be used toward a psychology major. 

C. Curriculum — Minor and Electives 

In addition to the core, school, and departmental requirements, the student 
must also complete the requirements for a minor, preferably in a related field. 
Courses not used to fulfill any of these requirements are free electives and may 
be taken in any department of the University. 

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) AND EDUCATIONAL 
PSYCHOLOGY (EPY) COURSES 

PSY 201 — General Psychology. Four hours. Every quarter. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior and experience. 

PSY 202 — Applied Psychology. Four hours. Every quarter. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201. 

Application of psychological methods and principles to occupational fields 
other than education, including business and industry, law, medicine, the 
ministry, and others. 

PSY 302 — Advanced General Psychology. Four hours. Fall and Spring. 

An advanced course in General Psychology covering in greater depth se- 
lected topics. Required of all psychology majors. 

EPY 316 — Human Growth and Development, Part I: Child. Four hours. 
Every quarter. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201. 

Study of the child through the elementary school years, emphasizing prin- 
ciples and problems of development. Case studies of individual children. 

EPY 319 — Educational Psychology. Four hours. Every quarter. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201. 

Application of psychological methods, facts, and principles to education. 

EPY 332 — Human Growth and Development, Part H. Adolescent. Four 
hours. (132) Every quarter. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201. 

A course dealing with development of the individual through the ado- 
lescent years. Case studies of individual adolescents. 

PSY 337 — Mental Hygiene. Four hours. Winter and Summer. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201. 

Characteristics of the wholesome personality and the building of healthy 
emotional attitudes; promotion of good mental health and prevention of ab- 
normalities. Emphasis is placed on increased personal efficiency. 

PSY 445- G445— Social Psychology. Four hours. Winter and Summer. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201. 

Psychological factors and influences in group behavior. Study of the indi- 
vidual in group situations, and the influence of the social environment on his 
behavior and development. 

PSY 449-G449^Industrial Psychology. Four hours. Fall and Spring. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201. (PSY 450 recommended). 

Applications of psychological principles and methods to problems of in- 
dustry, emphasizing employee selection and placement, merit rating, accident 
reduction, training, and measurement and improvement of employee morale. 

PSY 450-G450— Introduction to Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences. Four 
hours. Every quarter. 

Computation of measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. 
Introduction to concepts of sampling techniques (t tests, chi square, and analysis 
of variance). 



iqi 



Special Education 



PSY 451-G451 — Psychological Measurement. Four hours. Winter and Sum- 
mer. 

Prerequisites: PSY 201 and 450. 

Theory, problems and techniques of psychological measurement. Group 
tests of ability, aptitude, interests, and personality are emphasized. 

PSY 466-G466 — Experimental Psychology I. Four hours. Fall and Spring. 
Prerequisites: PSY 201 and 450 and permission of the instructor. 
Two hours of lecture and two 2 -hour laboratory periods per week. 
Introduction to psychological laboratory work. Experiments include study 
of sensory and perceptual processes, emotion and motivation. 

PSY 467-G467 — Experimental Psychology II. Four hours. Winter and Sum- 
mer. 

Prerequisites: PSY 201 and 450 and permission of the instructor. 

Two hours of lecture and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Introduction to psychological experimental techniques. Experiments in- 
clude study of learning, memory, and thinking. 

PSY 480-G480 — Psychology of Personality. Four hours. Winter and Sum- 
mer. 

Prerequisites: PSY 201 and permission of the instructor. 

A study of the facts involved in the development of the mature personal- 
ity, with an analysis of the structure and dynamics of personality; critical re- 
view of methods of personality evaluation. 

PSY 481 -G481— Abnormal Psychology. Four hours. Fall and Spring. 
Prerequisites: Good background in psychology and permission of the in- 
structor. 

Study of the major psychoses, the psychoneuroses, and mental deficiency; 
field trips and demonstration clinics. Primarily for psychology majors, pre- 
medical students, and students planning to enter law, social work, teaching, or 
the ministry. 

PSY 482-G482 — Physiological Psychology. Four hours. Winter and Summer. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201. 

Relationships between physiological functions, especially those of the 
nervous system, and psychological functions, including perception, emotion, 
motivation and learning. Primarily for psychology majors and premedical 
students. 

PSY 484-G484^History and Systems of Psychology. Four hours. Fall and 
Spring. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Review of the history of psychology, and intensive study of current sys- 
tems of psychology. Primarily for psychology majors as final senior course. 

PSY 492 — Special Problems in Psychology. Two to four hours. As needed. 

Prerequisites: Twenty-eight hours in psychology and approval of the de- 
partment chairman. 

Intensive study of a specific topic or problem in contemporary psychology. 
Preparation of a series of formal papers and reports. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPE) 

Lowe, Mehearg, Musgrave, Norsworthy 

The University of Southern Mississippi prepares teachers to teach mentally 
retarded children at both the elementary and the secondary level, and trains 
speech therapists to work with children in the public schools who have speech 
and hearing defects. Students who wish to become speech therapists should 
follow the program outlined under the Department of Speech and Hearing 
Sciences. 



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School of Education and Psychology 



Teachers who specialize in teaching the mentally retarded ordinarily major 
in Special Education with emphasis on the mentally retarded. They do part 
of their student teaching with mentally retarded children and part with normal 
children. It is possible for students to major in Elementary Education and take 
the additional specified courses to obtain an endorsement to teach the mentally 
retarded. 

Students wishing to major in Special Education and prepare to teach men- 
tally retarded children should follow the program outlined below: 

Program of Courses for a Major in Special Education 
and Certification to Teach the Mentally Retarded* 

Freshman and Sophomore Years Quarter Hours 

ENG 101, 102, 103 12 

ENG 201, and 202 or 433 8 

HIS 101, 102 8 

PS 101 4 

FS 104, 105, Physical Science I and II, and 

106, 107, Biological Science I and II 16 

MAT 100 4 

ART 107— Introductory Art 4 

ART 309 or ART 392 4 

PA 101 4 

Social Studies: Choose two from Geography 103, Economics 

200 or 251, or Sociology 103 or 201 8 

PSY 201 4 

MUS 165— The Enjoyment of Music 4 

HTH 179— Personal Health 4 

FED 300— Public Education in the United States 4 

Physical Education Activity Courses — 6 quarters 

88 
Elective to make total 96 hours for the year plus PE. 
Men students will be required to take the prescribed Military Science courses. 
"Students interested in teaching the mentally retarded at the secondary level should 
plan their programs with Mr. Norsworthy. 

Junior and Senior Years 

MED 361, 362— Music for Elementary Teachers 8 

EED 301— Arithmetic for Children 4 

EED 317 — Methods and Materials in Children's Literature 4 

SCE 432— Science for Elementary Teachers 4 

EED 305— Social Studies in the Elementary Grades 4 

EED 306— Language Arts in the Elementary School 4 

EED 309— Developing Skills in Reading 4 

EPY 319— Educational Psychology 4 

EPY 316— Human Growth and Development, Part I— Child 4 

EED 311— Developmental Reading Methods 4 

SPE 486— Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child 4 

SPE 455— Speech and Hearing Problems for the Classroom Teacher— or 

SHS 301— Introduction to Speech Pathology 4 

SPE 450— Psychology and Education of the Mentally Retarded 4 

SPE 460— Methods and Materials for Teaching the Mentally Retarded . . 4 



194 



Special Education 



SPE 480 or 481— Student Teaching of the Mentally Retarded 12 

EED 343 — Methods and Materials in Elementary Education 4 

SPE 470 — Curriculum Adaptations for Teaching Handicapped Youth . . 4 

SPE 487— Problems in Special Education 4 

84 
Electives to make total 96 hours for the years (Suggested PE 409, FED 416, 
FED 469, PSY 481, EED 412, MAT 318) 

Majors in Speech Therapy and Audiology may minor in Special Educa- 
tion. The minor will require EPY 316, EPY 319, EPY 332, FED 300, SPE 451, 
SPE 486, SPE 471, Student Teaching and Clinical Experience in Special Educa- 
tion for a minimum of 12 hours in SPE 471. 

Prospective teachers of exceptional children are urged to consult with Mr. 
Norsworthy in planning their programs. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSES (SPE) 
450-G450— Psychology and Education of the Mentally Retarded. Four 

hours. 

A study of the social, emotional, physical, and intellectual characteristics 
of the mentally retarded; methods of diagnosis and differentiation; and special 
class organization. 

451 — Methods in Speech and Hearing. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Speech Therapy 301, 330, and 401. 

A course designed to acquaint the Speech and Hearing major with clinical 
conditions as found in public schools, including practice with various types of 
speech and hearing cases, and instruction in working with parents, teachers, 
and the public in solving speech and hearing problems. 

455-G455 — Speech and Hearing Problems for the Classroom Teacher. 
Four hours. 

A course designed to acquaint the teacher with speech and hearing prob- 
lems commonly found in the classroom. 

460-G460— Methods and Materials for Teaching the Mentally Retarded. 
Four hours. 

A study of methods and materials most useful in teaching the mentally 
handicapped. Emphasizes the use of arts and crafts as instructional media. 

470-G470 — Curriculum Adaptations for Teaching Handicapped Youth. Four 
hours. 

Examination of the educational needs of mentally, physically, and emo- 
tionally handicapped youth of secondary school age and methods of meeting 
these needs. Emphasizes the principles and procedures of the cooperative Spe- 
cial Education- Vocational Rehabilitation program. 

471— Student Teaching and Clinical Experience in Special Education. Up 
to 12 hours. 

480 — Student Teaching of the Mentally Retarded — Elementary. Twelve 
hours. 

481— Student Teaching of the Mentally Retarded— Secondary. Twelve 
hours. 

486-G486 — The Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child. Four 
hours. 

Considers the psychological and educational needs of children in the 
atypical groups; physically, visually, or auditorially handicapped; defective 
speech, mentally retarded, or socially and emotionally maladjusted. 

487 -G487— Problems in Special Education. Four hours. 

Organization and administration at both state and local levels of the edu- 
cation of the exceptional child. 



*95 



School of Education and Psychology 



489— Seminar in Special Education Student Teaching. Eight hours. 

In-service student teaching designed for experienced teachers who have 
demonstrated their interest and ability as classroom teachers. Two years ex- 
perience as a teacher is required and enrollment will be limited to the summer 
quarter only. This course will deal with classroom management, programs of 
instruction, and student role in the educational environment. 

490-G490 — Workshop in Special Education. Four and one-half hours. 

Workshops in selected areas of Special Education. 

HUMAN RELATIONS (HUR) 

Gough 

34 — Personal and Social Development (women). No credit. 

A program aimed at self- enhancement of the individual student, with 
emphases on the development of personal attributes and social competence 
through practical demonstration and class interaction. 

135 — Foundations of Human Relations. Four hours. 

The development of the qualities of human personality from the standpoint 
of human relations. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION, 
SUPERVISION, AND CURRICULUM (AED) 

James H. Mailey, Chairman 
Anzalone, Baxter, Lucas, McPhail, McQuagge, Owings, Thomas 

The Department of Educational Administration, Supervision, and Curricu- 
lum offers programs for the preparation of administrators for the public schools 
and colleges and for teachers of educational administration. These preparation 
programs are offered only at the graduate level and lead to the master's degree, 
the sixth year specialist certificate, and the doctor's degree. For a description 
of these programs, consult the Graduate Bulletin. 

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE EDUCATION (SCE) 

Including Fundamentals of Science, (FS) 

A. G. Morgan, Chairman 

F. Brown, Frazier, Mauldin, Swann 

The Department of Science Education is operated jointly by the College of 
Arts and Sciences, and the School of Education and Psychology. The facilities 
are in the College of Arts and Sciences. Programs in teacher- education are in 
the School of Education and Psychology. Responsibility for the curriculum is 
shared jointly. Graduate programs are described in the Graduate Bulletin. 

PURPOSES 

The objectives of the Department of Science Education are: (1) to provide 
those courses in both the physical and biological sciences which would give a 
minimum degree of scientific literacy to all students; (2) to provide, in coopera- 
tion with the Department of Elementary Education, a curriculum in the sci- 
ences and science methods for elementary school teachers; (3) to provide 
advisement for those students planning to teach the sciences at the secondary 
school level; (4) to provide programs leading to advanced degrees in science 
education; (5) to work with public schools in the development of curricula, 
workshops, science fairs, and other activities designed to improve science in- 
struction at all public school levels. 



.0)6 



(p*74/A 



Science Education 



CURRICULUM AND PROGRAM 

The Department of Science Education is concerned primarily with teachers 
and prospective teachers of science. Although some students will be planning 
to teach a specific science, current public school organization does not encourage 
too much specialization; familiarity with principles and concepts common to all 
of the several scientific disciplines is prerequisite. Hence, courses in science 
education are so organized as to give teachers and prospective teachers a broad 
understanding of several of the sciences, with the opportunity for enough spe- 
cialization in one area to pursue advanced study. 

In general, all prospective science teachers will study mathematics through 
trigonometry. Calculus is prerequisite for some courses in chemistry and physics. 
Specialization in one scientific discipline will require a minimum of forty (40) 
quarter credit hours in that discipline. Certain courses offered by the various 
science departments specifically for public school teachers are applicable only 
to the degree programs in education offered by the School of Education and Psy- 
chology. 

The Department of Science Education offers a major in general science for 
secondary school teachers, grades 7 through 12. The recommended course of 
study is outlined below: 



Freshman Year: 

ENG 101, 102, 103 
MAT 101, 102, 103 
CHE 101, 102, 103 
GHY 103 
PS 101 
MUS or ART 

Junior Year: 

PA 101 

FED 300 (education) 

EPY 319, 332 (psychology) 

FED 469 (education) 

CHE 301, 302, 303 

BIO 104 or 311, 300 

GLY 101, 260 



Sophomore Year: 

BIO 101, 102, 103 

ENG 201, 433 

HIS 101, 102 

SOC 103 

PHY 101, 102, 103 

HTH 179 

PSY 201 

Senior Year: 

SED 451, 313, 481 (education) 
Electives 20 hours in biology, 

chemistry, geology, or physics 
Electives 8 hours 



The above program provides a broad background and some depth in all sci- 
ence areas, opportunity for considerable depth and specialization in one science 
area, and background in professional education necessary for effective teaching. 

Because of the nature of the teacher training program, a minor in general 
science is not offered by the Department. Students in the College of Arts 
and Sciences should discuss minors in the sciences with their major adviser 
and/or the particular science department chairman. Students in the School 
of Education and Psychology can major in Science Education and minor in 
Secondary Education. An adequate minor in general science is not possible. 
The program as outlined above for science teachers meets certification standards 
in all states in the areas of biology, chemistry, physics, earth sciences, general 
science, and physical science; and, in most cases, satisfies requirements for 
certification in combined areas, i.e., biology, chemistry, and general science, 
or chemistry, physics, and general science. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION COURSES (SCE) 
Including Fundamentals of Science (FS) 

Fundamentals of Science: A sequence of two courses in the physical sci- 
ences and two in the biological sciences. Each course carries four hours of credit 
and consists of four one-hour lecture -demonstration sessions per week. A work- 
ing knowledge of algebra is presupposed. These courses are designed to give 
students an acquaintance and understanding of certain fundamental principles 



197 



School of Education and Psychology 



and laws of the major science disciplines. Credit in these courses will not count 
toward the degree requirements for a major or minor in the sciences or in sec-~ 
ondary school science teaching. 

In as much as there is overlapping and duplication in these courses and 
those offered by various science departments, the student should read care- 
fully the prerequisites and limitations for each of the FS courses. Any ques- 
tions should be answered by the student's adviser and/ or the Department of 
Science Education prior to enrolling in these courses. 

FS 104 — Physical Science I. Four hours. 

A student who has credit for two quarters or one semester of physics can- 
not receive credit for this course. 

A study of matter and energy in the universe; their sources, transformation, 
and interactions; the forces acting within the universe; and the laws governing 
these phenomena. 

FS 105 — Physical Science II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: FS 104, or one semester or two quarters of physics. 

A student who has credit for one semester or two quarters of chemistry 
and,/ or physical or historical geology cannot receive credit for this course. 

A continuation of FS 104. Primary emphasis is on elementary and compound 
substances, the arrangement of and forces acting on these substances in the 
formation of the earth, atmosphere, and the universe. 

FS 106 — Biological Science I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: FS 105, or one semester or two quarters of chemistry. 

A student who has credit in BIO 101 and 102, one semester of biology, or 
freshman biology cannot receive credit for this course. 

Elementary studies of cell structure and function; gametogenesis, ontogeny, 
heredity, ecology, taxonomy, and phylogeny, with emphasis on the major groups 
of animals. 

FS 107 — Biological Science II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: FS 105, or one semester or two quarters of chemistry. 

A student who has credit in Botany 104 or other botany courses cannot 
receive credit for this course. 

Elementary studies of plant morphology, physiology, ecology, taxonomy, 
and phylogeny, with emphasis on the major groups of plants. 

SCE 400-G400— BSCS Biology for Secondary Teachers. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: 36 hours of biology. 

This course is for teachers only, and may not be used for credit toward a 
major in biology. 

A detailed critical examination of the subject matter, techniques, and meth- 
ods for teaching biology in secondary schools, as proposed by the Biological 
Sciences Curriculum Study. Designed to orient teachers in modern biology sub- 
ject matter and special techniques by presenting background material and spe- 
cial laboratory exercises. Emphasis is placed on the laboratory as the source of 
information from which sound conclusions can be drawn. 

SCE 401-G401— CHEM Chemistry for Secondary Teachers— Methods and 
Techniques. Four hours. 

Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: Thirty-six hours of chemistry including analytical chemistry 
or consent of instructor. 

A course designed to familiarize chemistry teachers with the materials, 
methods, and techniques of teaching chemistry developed by the Chemical 
Education Materials Study Committee. Unifying principles of chemistry are 
emphasized, with laboratory work providing the basis of development. 

SCE 432— Science for Elementary Teachers. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: FS 104, 105, 108, 107, or 8 quarter hours in physical science 
and 8 quarter hours in biological science. 



198 



Secondary Education 



Six hours of lecture, audio-visual, and laboratory work per week. 

Designed to relate basic scientific principles to the elementary grades, and 
provide experience in presenting these principles to the elementary school child 
through the use of a variety of materials, activities, and methods. Required 
of and designed only for elementary education majors. 

SCE 447 — Nature Study and Elementary Science. Four hours. 

Six hours of lecture and field work per week. 

Familiarizes prospective teachers with the biological and physical materials 
commonly close at hand and assists in the identification and utilization of these 
materials. Considers the whole environment of the child and his observation 
and interpretation of it. May be taken as an elective for elementary education 
majors. 

DEPARTMENT OF SECONDARY EDUCATION (SED) 

Eric M. Gunn, Chairman 
Campbell, Hagenson, Landskov, Rogers, Scoggins 

The student who plans to teach at the high school level will work toward 
the Bachelor of Science "Professional" degree. This degree requires an academic 
major and a minor in Secondary Education. The majors available for this de- 
gree are listed under the General Degree Requirements Section of this catalog. 
The Basic College, school, and professional or minor requiremnts are listed on 
preceding pages. The National Teacher Examination is also part of the degree 
requirement. A student in Secondary Education will have two advisers: the 
Chairman of the Department of Secondary Education and the chairman of the 
department in which he is majoring. Students should also read carefully the 
requirements for student teaching. No more than twelve quarter hours in pro- 
fessional education courses taken by correspondence may be accepted for a 
degree. 

The ''professional" degree meets the requirements for certification by state 
and national certification agencies. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION COURSES (SED) 

310 — Junior-Senior High School Reading Methods. Four hours. 

A course designed to familiarize junior and senior high school teachers with 
reading methods and materials. Special emphasis is placed on improving read- 
ing skills in the subject matter areas and providing suitable material for poor 
readers. 

313 — Principles of Teaching in High School. Four hours. 

Taken simultaneously with SED 481. 

Aims of secondary education, motivation and direction of learning, school 
organization, including guidance, and an introduction into methodology. 

451A — Methods in Business Education. Four hours. 

A study of business education trends and aims, teaching procedures, tests 
and measurement, special helps, and teaching materials. 

451B — Methods in Art. Four hours. 

Aims, objectives, and methods of art education in the elementary and sec- 
ondary schools. 

451G — Methods in Industrial Arts. Four hours. 

Methods and materials in the teaching of industrial arts. 

451H — Methods in English— Secondary. Four hours. 

Required of English majors who follow the professional teaching program. 
Should be taken in the third quarter of the junior year or in the summer pre- 
ceding the senior year. A course in methods of teaching English in the junior 
and senior high schools. 

4511 — Methods in Foreign Languages. Four hours. 



I 99 



School of Education and Psychology 



Required of foreign language majors who follow the professional teaching 
program. A course in methods of teaching French, Spanish, and German in 
high schools. 

SED 451J — Methods in Teaching Science — Secondary. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing (this course should be taken one or two 
quarters before student practice teaching). 

A course designed to familiarize teachers with trends in the secondary 
science curriculum. It includes a study of materials and techniques used in 
presenting subject matter to the secondary school student. Emphasis is placed 
upon the design of activities dealing with science as a form of inquiry and in- 
vestigation. Readings are required in the science and science education pe- 
riodicals. 

451K — Methods in Mathematics — Secondary. Four hours. 

Should be taken after the student has completed most of his mathematics 
courses. 

A course designed to give the student a knowledge of the foundation on 
which mathematics is built, the aims and purposes of teaching the subject in 
high school, curriculum problems, organization and presentation of subject 
matter, methods of teaching, and methods of testing. 

451L — Methods in Social Studies — Secondary. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: EPY 319 or consent of instructor. 

A study of principal methods of teaching, application of psychological prin- 
ciples to teaching, methods of selecting content, and materials available. The 
work is adapted to the social studies in the high school. 

451M — Methods in Speech. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

A general orientation to the teaching of speech, followed by individualized 
unit work in the special fields of speech. 

451P — Methods and Principles in Health, Physical Education, and Recrea- 
tion. Four hours. 

For grades 1 through 12. Primarily for students majoring or minoring in 
health, physical education, and recreation. Materials and techniques of teach- 
ing health, physical education, and recreation in public schools. 

451T — Methods in Journalism. Four hours. 

A course designed to prepare the student for the teaching of journalism 
on the secondary school level. Should be scheduled after the student has taken 
the majority of his courses in journalism. 

462-G462— Curriculum of the Secondary School. Two hours. 

A critical examination of the present day curriculum with emphasis upon 
the core curriculum. 

464-G464 — Student Activities in Secondary Schools. Two hours. 

Consideration is given to the general nature and organization of the pro- 
gram popularly known as extra-curricular activities. Major emphasis is placed 
upon the various activities that constitute an activity program in a modern 
high school. 

481-A-S — Student Teaching in High School. Twelve hours. 

Prerequisites: The completion of 132 hours of college including FED 300, 
EPY 319, EPY 332, SED 451, and 2/3 of the work in the student's major field, 
of which at least eight hours must have been taken in residence in this insti- 
tution. (See Student Teaching.) 

The individual courses in pre-service student teaching are listed below: 

481A (Business Education) Twelve hours 

481B (Art) Twelve hours 

481G (Industrial Arts) Twelve hours 

481H (English) Twelve hours 



lOO 



Secondary Education 






4811 (Foreign Languages) Twelve hours 

481 J (Sciences) Twelve hours 

481K (Mathematics) Twelve hours 

481L (Social Studies) Twelve hours 

481M (Speech) Twelve hours 

481P (Health, Physical Education, Recreation) Twelve hours 

481R (Library Science) Twelve hours 

481S (Music Education) Twelve hours 

489 — Seminar in Secondary Student Teaching. Eight hours. 

In-service student teaching designed for experienced teachers who have 
demonstrated their interest and ability as classroom teachers. Two years ex- 
perience as a teacher is required and enrollment will be limited to the summer 
quarter only. This course will deal with classroom management, programs of 
instruction, and student role in the educational environment. 



XOI 



SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 

Raymond Mannoni, Dean 
PURPOSE 

The primary purpose of the School of Fine Arts is to provide its students 
with a well-rounded preparation for professional or teaching careers in one of 
the many branches of art, music, or theater. In addition, it seeks to provide 
opportunities for students in all departments of the University to participate in 
artistic activities and develop an awareness of cultural values. 

To achieve its purposes, the School of Fine Arts offers courses of study 
centered around a core of theoretical, historical, and other academic subjects, 
and designed to develop artistic ability and general cultural awareness. 

ORGANIZATION 

The School of Fine Arts is organized into four departments: Art, Music, 
Music Education, and Theatre. The baccalaureate degrees awarded are in Fine 
Arts, Art, Music, and Music Education, with appropriate majors. Undergraduate 
minors are available in Art History, Music, and Theatre. 

Since curricular requirements vary for each major, students aiming at 
degrees from the School of Fine Arts should follow the course sequences for 
each year outlined in detail under each department in the following pages. 

A student majoring in Elementary Education who wishes to minor in Fine 
Arts may do so by electing the following courses: 

MUS 165 THE 103 

MED 361 ART 107 

MED 362 ART 120 

MED 463 ART 309 

DEPARTMENT OF ART (ART) 

Walter Lok, Chairman 
Ambrose, Barrio, Campbell, Felty, Merrifield, Poirier, Willis 

Curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts are offered in 
Drawing and Painting, Commercial Art, Three Dimensional Design, and 
toward Teacher Certification. The National Teacher Examination is required 
of all candidates for teacher certification. A major is available in Art leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. A minor program is also available in the 
History of Art. 

All transfer students are required to submit a portfolio of representative 
work prior to registration in order to receive advanced standing. 

Exhibitions on tour and students' exhibitions aiv arranged and presented 
by the faculty, student committees, and members of the local chapter of Kappa 
Pi, national honorary art fraternity. 

The Department reserves the right to retain student work for exhibition 
purposes. 

The FRESHMAN year is a common course of study for all major programs 
in Art. 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Art 120; Appreciation 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

Art 101, 102, 103; Drawing 4 4 4 

Art 111, 112, 113; Design 4 4 4 

17 17 17 
The remaining three years are detailed below for each undergraduate major. 



lOI 



Art 



DRAWING AND PAINTING MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts) 
Sophomore 

English 201, 202 4 4 

Mathematics 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 

Physical Education , 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Art 315, 325, 335; History 4 4 4 

Art 201, 202, 203; Figure Drawing 4 4 4 

17 17 17 

Junior 

Science 4 4 4 

Core Electives from two of the following areas: 

Health 179, Philosophy 101 or 201, Public Address 101 4 4 

Art 321; Watercolor 4 

Foreign Language 4 4 4 

Art 331; Oil Painting 4 

Art Electives 4 4 

16 16 16 

Senior 

Art 322, 423; Watercolor 4 4 

Art Elective 4 

Art 332, 433; Oil Painting 4 4 

Art 470; Painting Project 4 

Electives 8 8 8 

16 16 16 

COMMERCIAL ART MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts) 
Sophomore 

English 201, 202 4 4 

Mathematics 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Art 315, 325, 335; History 4 4 4 

Art 201, 202; Figure Drawing 4 4 

Art 321; Watercolor 4 

17 17 17 

Junior 

Science 4 4 4 

Core Electives from two of the following: 

Health 179, Philosophy 101 or 201, Public Address 101 4 4 

Art Elective 4 

Art 341, 342, 343; Commercial 4 4 4 

Foreign Language 4 4 4 

16 16 16 

Senior 

Art 441, 442, 443; Advertising 4 4 4 

Art Elective 4 4 

Art 480; Advertising Project 4 

EHectives 8 8 8 

16 16 16 



103 



School of Fine Arts 



THREE DIMENSIONAL DESIGN MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts) 

Sophomore 

English 201, 202 4 4 

Mathematics 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 201, 202, 203, (male students) 1 1 1 

Art 315, 325, 335; History 4 4 4 

Art 201, 202; Figure Drawing 4 4 

Art 321; Watercolor 4 

17 17 17 

Junior 

Science 4 4 4 

Core Electives from two of the following: 

Health 179, Philosophy 101 or 201, Public Address 101 4 4 

Art 355, 356, 457; Ceramics 4 4 4 

Art Elective 4 

Foreign Language 4 4 4 

16 16 16 

Senior 

Art 351, 352, 453; Sculpture 4 4 4 

Art Elective 4 4 

Art 493, Three Dimensional Design Project 4 

Electives 8 8 8 

16 16 16 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION CURRICULUM 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts) 
Sophomore 

English 201, 330 4 4 

Mathematics 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Social Science Core Electives 4 

Psychology 201 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Physical Science 104 4 

Art 315, 325, 335; History 4 4 4 

Art 355; Ceramics I 4 

Art 356; Ceramics II 4 

17 17 17 

Junior 

Physical Sciencev 105 4 

Biological Science 106, 107 4 4 

Public Address 101 4 

Health 179 4 

Educational Psychology 319 4 

Foundations in Education 300 4 

Art 309; Elementary School Art 4 

Art 310; Public School Art 4 

451B; Methods in Art : 4 

Art 351; Sculpture I 4 

Art 352; Sculpture II 4 

16 16 16 



104 



Art 



Senior 

Test & Measurements— FED 469 4 

Human Growth & Development— EPY 342 II 4 

Student Teaching— SED 481 B 12 

Principles of Teaching in High School— SED 313 4 

Art Elective 8 

Crafts— ART 412-412G 4 

Art Education Project— ART 492, 492G 2 2 

Commercial Art— ART 342 4 

Watercolor— ART 321 4 

Oil— ART 331 4 

18 18 16 

ART MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts) 

Sophomore 

English 201, 202 4 4 

Mathematics 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Physical Education 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Art 315, 325, 335; History 4 4 4 

*Art Sequence I 4 4 4 

17 17 17 

Junior 

Science 4 4 4 

Core Electives from two of the following: 

Health 179, Philosophy 101 or 201, Public Address 101 4 4 

* *Minor or Elective 4 

Foreign Language 4 4 4 

*Art Sequence II 4 4 4 

16 16 16 

Senior 

Foreign Language 4 4 

**Minor and Electives 12 12 12 

16 16 16 

♦Twelve hours of art from a single area constitutes a sequence. 
**Minor hours must total twenty-eight from an approved subject field. 

ART COURSES (ART) 

101 — Beginning Drawing. Four hours. 

Basic problems in black and white sketching and modeling. Techniques 
for dry media such as pencil, conte crayon, charcoal. 

102 — Intermediate Drawing. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 101 or permission of instructor. 

Fluid media techniques; pen and ink; felt nibs; wash. More emphasis on 
composition. 

103 — Advanced Drawing. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 102 or permission of instructor. 

Creative drawing in all media. Introduction of color. Emphasis on inter- 
pretation and composition. 

107 — Introductory School Art. Four hours. 

For students in teaching programs. 

Fundamentals of lettering, drawing, perspective, light and shade, color 
theory, and design. 



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School of Fine Arts 



111 — Beginning Design. Four hours. 

Study of the terms of visual design: problems involving all the design ele- 
ments in non-objective and more figurative modes. A color theory and some 
lettering. 

112— Intermediate Design. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ART 111 or permission of the instructor. 

Further study of the creative approach to design in a variety of media 
and techniques. 

113 — Advanced Design. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ART 112 or permission of the instructor. 
A course in design applied to some reproductive techniques and three 
dimensional expressions. 

120— Art Appreciation. Four hours. 

An introductory course providing a background for art appreciation. An 
approach to the understanding of the plastic arts. 

201 — Figure Drawing. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Study of the construction and use of the human figure in design. Drawing 
from the model in various media. 

202 — Figure Drawing. Four hours. 
A continuation of 201. 

203 — Figure Drawing. Four hours. 
A continuation of 202. 

261 — Graphic Arts. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 103 and 113 or equivalent or permission of the in- 
structor. 

A study of design for, and techniques of, the various graphic arts (etch- 
ing, drypoint, lithograph). Studio problems in some of the above techniques. 

Art 309— Elementary School Art. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 107 (Elementary Education Majors). ART 101 and ART 

111 (Art Education Majors). 

An application of art techniques to the elementary classroom situation 
through the study of growth patterns, motivation, guidance, and evaluation of 
class projects. 

Art 310— Public School Art. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 309. 

An application of art techniques to the secondary classroom situation 
through the study of growth patterns, unit plans, motivation, guidance, and 
evaluation of class projects. 

315 — History of Art. Four hours. 
Pre-Historic to medieval. A survey course. 

321— Watercolor Painting. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 103 and 113 or permission of the instructor. 

322— Watercolor Painting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 321. 

Continuation of Art 321 with problems in opaque media. 

325 — History of Art. Four hours. 

Medieval to eighteenth century. A survey course. 

331 — Oil Painting. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 103 and 113 or permission of the instructor. 



^o6 



Art 



Studies in the techniques of oil painting. Color, composition, and surface 
quality stressed. 

332— Oil Painting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 331. 

Further study in oil techniques. Greater emphasis on subject matter or 
content. 

335— History of Art. Four hours. 

Eighteenth century through modern. A survey course. 

341 — Commercial Art. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 103 and 113 or permission of the instructor. 

Recommended for those interested in any form of commercial art. The 
rendering of objects and materials for commercial presentation. 

342 — Commercial Art. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 103 and 113 or permission of the instructor. 

Hand and precision lettering, and advertising and show card layout. 

343 — Commercial Art. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 341, 342, or permission of the instructor. 

A study of commercial illustrative techniques and their application to a 
variety of layout problems. 

Art 351 — Sculpture. Four hours. 

Problems in three-dimensional design. Study of forming, assemblage, and 
casting techniques. 

Art 352 — Sculpture. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ART 351. 

A continuation of Art 351, with emphasis in modeling, direct carving, and 
metal sculpture. 

355 — Ceramics I. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 103 and 113 or permission of the instructor. 
The use of ceramic materials as a means of expression. Experiences in hand 
forming, application of glazes, and firing. 

356 — Ceramics II. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ART 355. 

A continuation of Art 355. Experiences in wheel forming, slip casting, and 
glazemaking. 

362 — Graphic Arts. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 261. 

Further problems in design and production using various graphic media. 

370— Illustration. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 201 and 103 or permission of instructor. 

Practical problems in the illustration of ^oems and short stories. Black 
and white and color studies involving the relation of medium and technique 
to subject. 

392 — Special Projects for Elementary Teachers I & II. Two hours each. 

Prerequisite: ART 107. 

Projects in art and methods of presentation to children in the grades. 
Need not be taken in sequence. 

410— Ancient Art. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 315. 

The artistic achievements of the ancient world. A careful analysis of im- 
portant examples correlated with their background. 

Art 412-G412— Crafts. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 113. 

A study of the crafts: dealing with jewelry, enameling, batik, and similar 
techniques. 



ioy 



School of Fine Arts 



420— Medieval Art. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 325. 

A study of the art of the western civilizations from the fall of the Roman 
Empire to the end of the fourteenth century, including Early Christian and 
Byzantine sources. 

423 — Watercolor Painting. Four hours. 

Advanced study in opaque and transparent watercolor. Experiments with 
mixed media. 

430 — Renaissance Art. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: ART 325. 

The art of Italy, France, Germany, Spain, and the Low Countries from 
the close of the Middle Ages through the sixteenth century. 

433 — Oil Painting. Four hours. 

Further study in oils based on experiments in Arts 331 and 332 with 
special emphasis on techniques and specialized subject matter fields. 

440 — Baroque and Rococo Art. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 325 and 335. 

The tracing of these movements through the western world from the 
close of the sixteenth through the eighteenth century. 

441 — Advertising Design. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 343 or permission of the instructor. 

Practical problems in advertising design, with particular attention to 
modern reproduction methods and preparation of suitable copy. 

442 — Advertising Design. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 441. 

A continuation of Art 441 including a study of color separation techniques 
and typographic experiments. 

443 — Advertising Design. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 442. 

A continuation of Art 442, with particular emphasis on professional pro- 
cedure. 

450 — Nineteenth Century Art. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 335. 

An analysis of Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism. 

453— Sculpture. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 352. 

Individual instruction in advanced sculptural techniques. 

457— Ceramics III. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 356. 

A continuation of Art 356. An application of ceramic techniques to a variety 
of expressive forms. Further experiments with clay bodies, firing, and glazing. 

460 — Twentietn Century Art. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 335. 

An analysis of Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, Surrealism, and Expressionism. 

463— Graphic Arts. Four hours. 

A continuation of Art 362. 

470 — Painting Project. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 433, 423, or permission of instructor. 

Full quarter series or unit project in painting involving considerable re- 
search. Seminar. 

480 — Advertising Project. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 443 or permission of instructor. 

Full quarter series or unit project in advertising design and presentation 
involving considerable research. Seminar. 



10S 



Music 



492-G492— Art Education Project. Two-four hours. 

Prerequisite: ART 309. 

A research project of considerable scope and depth in the area of specialized 
art techniques as applied to the classroom situation. Should be repeated to a 
total of four hours credit by all art education majors. 

493 — Three Dimensional Design Project. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: ART 453, 457. 

Full quarter series or unit project in three dimensional expression involving 
considerable research. Seminar. 

MUSIC AND MUSIC EDUCATION 

The University of Southern Mississippi is a fully accredited member of 
the National Association of Schools of Music. Requirements for entrance and 
for graduation are in accordance with the published regulations of this As- 
sociation. 

Entrance examinations in music theory are given all freshman music stu- 
dents. Transfer students are given validation examinations in theory and in 
their applied areas. 

Students desiring to major in music can elect piano, organ, voice, violin, 
viola, violoncello, string bass, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, French horn, saxo- 
phone, baritone, trumpet, trombone, tuba, music history and literature, theory- 
composition, church music, or vocal or instrumental music education as a major. 
Any student of the University not registered for a music degree may pursue 
such courses in music as he wishes if he pays the required fees. 

Music majors who have taken music courses under private instruction or 
in such way as not to receive credit may be excused from required courses 
in the music curriculum on the basis of tests of proficiency. 

Every music major is required to participate in the same major organiza- 
tion for 12 quarters, with the exception of music education majors, who will be 
excused the quarter of their internship. Departmental approval must be re- 
ceived if the student wishes to change organization. In addition, the student 
will be allowed to participate in one other ensemble. Permission for participa- 
tion in more than two ensembles must be granted by the Dean of the School. 
Music majors may enroll for credit in organizations if their loads permit. Every 
music major is also required to attend weekly recital class each quarter. 

The student who wishes to take a B.A. or B.S. degree and minor in music 
may do so by taking the following distribution of courses: 

Music Theory 101, 102, 103 12 hours 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 6 hours 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 3 hours 

Piano 6 hours 

Voice 3 hours 

Instrument Electives 3 hours 

Music Electives 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC (MUS) 

David Foltz, Chairman 

Allen, Andersen, Benner, Birmingham, Donohue, A. Gower, Hays, Hill, Huck, 

Imbragulio, Mannoni, Monachino, Presser, Stocker, Ware 

APPLIED MUSIC CURRICULA 

These curricula provide instruction designed to prepare a student for a 
career as a professional musician or private teacher. Careful attention is given 
to the development of technique, interpretation, and musicianship. A broad 
knowledge of literature and musical styles is emphasized. 



109 



School of Fine Arts 



Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Music in applied music must 

present recitals selected from composers of the classic, romantic, and modern 
schools of composition in their senior year. 

WIND MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music) 

Freshman 

Music Theory 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 2 2 2 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

Piano 101-1, 102-1, 103-1 1 1 1 

Major Wind Instrument 2 2 2 

Band or Orchestra 181B, 182B, 183B, or 181A, 182A, 183A 

18 18 18 

Sophomore 

Music Theory 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

History of Music 231, 232, 233 2 2 2 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 

Physical Education 

Science 4 4 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101 4 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Piano 201-1, 202-1, 203-1 1 1 1 

Major Wind Instrument 2 2 2 

Band or Orchestra 281B, 282B, 283B, or 281A, 282A, 283A 

18 18 18 

Junior 

Harmonic and Formal Analysis 301, 302, 303 2 2 2 

Counterpoint, 321, 322. 323 2 2 2 

Ensemble 371, 372, 373 2 2 2 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 1 1 1 

Voice Class 301, 302 3 3 

Major Wind Instruments 3 3 3 

Italian, French, or German 4 4 4 

Band or Orchestra 381B, 382B, 383B, or 381A, 382A, 383A 

17 17 14 

Senior 

Orchestration 401, 402 3 3 

Adv. Ensemble 471, 472, 473 2 2 2 

Wind Pedagogy 451E, 452E, 453E 2 2 2 

Instrumental Literature 441D, 442D, 443D 2 2 2 

Major Instrument 3 3 3 

Recital 415 3 

String Class 455 2 

Woodwind Class 457 2 

Brass Class 459 2 

Electives 2 2 

Band or Orchestra 481B, 482B, 483B, or 481A, 482A, 483A 

16 16 14 



XIO 



Music 



PIANO MAJOR 

(Leading to degree of Bachelor of Music) 

Freshman 

Music Theory 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 2 2 2 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

Piano 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 181 A, B, or C; 

182 A, B, or C; 183 A, B, or C 

17 17 17 

Sophomore 

Music Theory 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

History of Music 231, 232, 233 2 2 2 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 

Physical Education 

Science 4 4 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101 4 

Military Scienos 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Piano 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 281 A, B, or C; 

282 A, B, or C; 283 A, B, or C 

17 17 17 

Junior 

Harmonic & Formal Analysis 301, 302, 303 2 2 2 

Counterpoint 321, 322, 323 2 2 2 

Ensemble 371, 372, 373 2 2 2 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 1 1 1 

Voice Class 301, 302 3 3 

Piano 301-3, 302-3, 303-3 3 3 3 

Italian, French, or German 4 4 4 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 381 A, B, or C; 

382 A, B, or C; 383 A, B, or C 

17 17 14 
Senior 

Orchestration 401, 402 3 3 

Adv. Ensemble 471, 472, 473 2 2 2 

Piano Pedagogy 451B 452B, 453B 2 2 2 

Piano Literature 441B, 442B, 443B 2 2 2 

Piano 401, 402, 403 3 3 3 

Recital 415 3 

Electives 4 4 2 

16 16 14 

ORGAN MAJOR 

(Leading to degree of Bachelor of Music) 
Freshman 

Music Theory 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 2 2 2 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Physical Education 



ill 



School of Fine Arts 



Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

Piano 101-1, 102-1, 103-1 1 1 3 

Organ 111-2, 112-2, 113-2 2 2 2 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 181 A, B, or C; 

182 A, B, or C; 183 A, B, or C 

18 18 18 
Sophomore 

Music Theory 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

History of Music 231, 232, 233 2 2 2 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 

Physical Education 

Science 4 4 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101 4 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Piano 201-1, 202-1, 203-1 1 1 1 

Organ 211-2, 212-2, 213-2 2 2 2 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 281 A, B, or C; 

282 A, B, or C; 283 A, B, or C 

18 18 18 
Junior 

Harmonic & Formal Analysis 301, 302, 303 2 2 2 

Counterpoint 321, 322, 323 2 2 2 

Ensemble 371, 372, 373 2 2 2 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 1 1 1 

Voice Class 301, 302 3 3 

Organ 311-3, 312-3, 313-3 3 3 3 

Italian, French, or German 4 4 4 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 381 A, B, or C; 

382 A, B, or C; 383 A, B, or C 

17 17 14 
Senior 

Orchestration 401, 402 3 3 

Adv. Ensemble 471, 472, 473 2 2 2 

Organ Pedagogy 451C, 452C, 453C 2 2 2 

Organ Literature 441C, 442C, 443C 2 2 2 

Organ 411-3, 412-3, 413-3 3 3 3 

Recital 415 2 

Electives 2 2 2 

Gregorian Chant 461 2 

Hymnology 462 2 

Administration of Church Music 463 2 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 481 A, B, or C; 

482 A, B, or C; 483 A, B, or C 

16 16 15 

STRING MAJOR 

(Leading to degree of Bachelor of Music) 
Freshman 

Music Theory, 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 2 2 2 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

Piano 101-1, 102-1, 103-1 1 1 1 

Major Instrument 121-2, 122-2, 123-2 2 2 2 

Orchestra or Band 181A, 182A, 183A, or 181B, 182B, 183B 

18 18 18 



111 



Music 



Sophomore 

Music Theory 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

History of Music 231, 232, 233 2 2 2 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 

Physical Education 

Science 4 4 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101 4 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Piano 201-1, 202-1, 203-1 1 1 1 

Major String Instrument 221-2, 222-2, 223-2 2 2 2 

Orchestra or Band 281A, 282A, 283A, or 281B, 282B, 283B 

18 18 18 
Junior 

Harmonic & Formal Analysis 301, 302, 303 2 2 2 

Counterpoint 321, 322, 323 2 2 2 

Ensemble 371, 372, 373 2 2 2 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 1 1 1 

Voice Class 301, 302 3 3 

Major String Instrument 321-3, 322-3, 323-3 3 3 3 

Italian, French, or German 4 4 4 

Orchestra or Band 381A, 382A, 383A, or 381B, 382B, 383B 

17 17 14 
Senior 

Orchestration 401, 402 3 3 

Adv. Ensemble 471, 472, 473 2 2 2 

String Pedagogy 451D, 452D, 453D 2 2 2 

Instrumental Literature 441D, 442D, 443D 2 2 2 

Major String Instrument 421-3, 422-3, 423-3 3 3 3 

Recital 415 2 

String Class 455 2 

Woodwind Class 457 2 

Brass Class 459 2 

Electives 2 2 2 

Orchestra or Band 481A, 482A, 483A, or 481B, 482B, 483B 

16 16 15 

VOICE MAJOR 

(Leading to degree of Bachelor of Music) 
Freshman 

Music Theory 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 2 2 2 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

Piano 101-1, 102-1, 103-1 1 1 1 

Voice 161-2, 162-2, 163-2 2 2 2 

Chorus 181C, 182C, 183C 

18 18 18 

Sophomore 

Music Theory 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

History of Music 231, 232, 233 2 2 2 

Theater Production I, II, 201, 202 4 4 

Physical Education 

Science 4 4 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101 4 



M 3 



School of Fine Arts 



Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Piano 201-1, 202-1, 203-1 1 1 1 

Voice 261-2, 262-2, 263-2 2 2 2 

Chorus 281C, 282C, 283C 

18 18 18 
Junior 

Harmonic & Formal Analysis 301, 302, 303 2 2 2 

Counterpoint 321, 322, 323 2 2 2 

Opera Workshop 341, 342, 343 2 2 2 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 1 1 1 

Italian, French, or German 4 4 4 

Voice 361-3, 362-3, 363-3 3 3 3 

Electives 2 2 

Psychology 201 4 

Chorus 381C, 382C, 383C 

16 16 18 
Senior 

Orchestration 401, 402 3 3 

Opera Workshop 441, 442, 443 2 2 2 

Voice Pedagogy 451A, 452A, 453A 2 2 2 

Voice Literature 441A, 442A, 443A 2 2 2 

Diction 401, 402, 403 1 1 1 

Social Studies electives 4 4 

Voice 461-3, 462-3, 463-3 3 3 3 

Recital 415 3 

Chorus 481C, 482C, 483C 

17 17 13 
The Curriculum in Church Music 

The curriculum in Church Music, with either voice or organ as a major, 
is designed to provide a thorough and complete course of training for those 
who intend to pursue church music as a full time profession. Special emphasis 
is placed on literature to be used in the church services. A recital must be pre- 
sented on the major instrument during the senior year to be a candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Music with Church Music as the major. Students will not 
be enrolled for organ until satisfactory proficiency at the piano has been demon- 
strated. 

CHURCH MUSIC MAJOR 

(Leading to degree of Bachelor of Music) 

Freshman 

Music Theory 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 2 2 2 

Major Applied Music (organ or voice) 2 2 2 

Piano 101-1, 102-1, 103-1 1 1 1 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Political Science 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

Chorus 181C, 182C, 183C 

18 18 18 

Sophomore 

Music Theory 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

History of Music 231, 232, 233 2 2 2 

Major Applied Music (organ or voice) 2 2 2 

Piano 201-1, 202-1, 203-1 1 1 1 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 



i!4 



Music 



Science 4 4 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Chorus 281C, 282C, 283C 

18 18 18 
Junior 

Karmonic & Formal Analysis 301, 302, 303 2 2 2 

Counterpoint 321, 322, 323 2 2 2 

Major Applied Music (organ or voice) 3 3 3 

Minor Applied Music (voice or organ) 1 1 1 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 1 1 1 

History of Church Music 351, 352, 353 2 2 2 

Elementary Music Methods 311 2 

Intermediate Music Methods 312 2 

Junior High School Methods 313 2 

Old Testament— REL 201 4 

New Testament— REL 202 4 

Elective 4 

Chorus 381C, 382C, 383C 

17 17 17 
Senior 

Composition 311, 312, 313 2 2 2 

Advanced Choral Conducting 2 2 2 

Major Applied Music (organ or voice) 3 3 3 

Minor Applied Music (voice or organ) 1 1 1 

Liturgies 460 2 

Conducting from the Console 458 2 

Gregorian Chant 461 2 

Church Music and Materials 459 2 

Hymnology 462 2 

Administration of Church Music 463 2 

Italian, French, or German 4 4 4 

Recital 415 2 

Chorus 481C, 482C, 483C 

16 16 18 
The Curriculum in Music History and Literature 

The curriculum in Music History and Literature is planned for those who 
intend to teach on the college level or for those who desire careers in musical 
journalism, music publishing, or the recording industry — fields in which a wide 
and comprehensive knowledge of music history and literature is essential. 

The major in music literature will receive a strong foundation not only in 
his chosen field but also in theory and in academic subjects which will enrich 
the student's cultural background. 

MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE MAJOR 

(Leading to degree of Bachelor of Music) 
Freshman 

Music Theory 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 2 2 2 

Piano 101-1, 102-1, 103-1 1 1 1 

Applied Music Electives 2 2 2 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Political Science 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 181A, B, or C; 182A, B, or C; 183A, B, C 

18 18 18 



XI 5 



School of Fine Arts 



Sophomore 

Music Theory 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

History of Music 231, 232, 233 2 2 2 

Piano 201-1, 202-1, 203-1 1 1 1 

Applied Music Electives 2 2 2 

Science 4 4 4 

Italian, French, or German 4 4 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 281A, B, or C; 282A, B, or C; 283A, B, or C. . . .0 

18 18 18 

Junior 

Harmonic & Formal Analysis 301, 302, 303 2 2 2 

Counterpoint 321, 322, 323 2 2 2 

Baroque Music 435 4 

Eighteenth Century Music 436 4 

Nineteenth Century Music 437 4 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 1 1 1 

Applied Music Elective 2 2 2 

History of Church Music 351, 352, 353 2 2 2 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 381A, B, or C; 382A, B, or C; 383A, B, or C. ... 

17 17 17 

Senior 

Music Literature Electives 441, 442, 443 4 4 4 

Orchestration 401, 402 3 3 

History of Opera 431 4 

American Music 432 4 

Twentieth Century Music 433 4 

Applied Music Electives 2 2 2 

Electives 4 4 4 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 481A, B, or C; 482A, B, or C: 483A, B, or C. . . 

17 17 14 
The Curriculum in Theory- Composition 

This course is designed to prepare the student for teaching theory and com- 
position, writing and arranging music of serious intent, and arranging and 
writing music of a commercial nature. Various steps in the preparation of music 
from the preliminary sketch to the published composition are included. The 
student will become familiar with the Musicwriter, Vari-Typer, diazo- printing, 

offset-printing, copyright law, and the sale, distribution and promotion of 
published music. 

THEORY— COMPOSITION MAJOR 

(Leading to Degree of Bachelor of Music) 

Freshman 

Music Theory 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 2 2 2 

Piano 101-1, 102-1, 103-1 1 \ \ 

Applied Music Electives 2 2 2 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Physical Education J 

Militarv Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 181A, B, or C; 182A, B, or C; 183A, B, or C. . . 

18 18 18 



XI i 



Music 



Sophomore 

Music Theory 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

History of Music 231, 232, 233 2 2 2 

Piano 201-1, 202-1, 203-1 1 1 1 

Applied Music Electives 2 2 2 

Social Science Core Electives 4 4 

Science 4 4 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 281A, B, or C; 282A, B, or C; 283A, B, or C. . . 

18 18 18 
Junior 

Harmonic & Formal Analysis 301, 302, 303 2 2 2 

Counterpoint 321, 322, 333 2 2 2 

Composition 311, 312, 313 2 2 2 

Orchestration 401, 402 3 3 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 1 1 1 

Voice 161-2, 162-2, 163-2 2 2 2 

Applied Music Electives 1 1 1 

Italian, French, or German 4 4 4 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 381A, B, or C; 382A, B, or C; 383A, B, or C. . . 

17 17 14 
Senior 

Advanced Counterpoint 421, 422, 423 2 2 2 

Advanced Composition 411, 412, 413 2 2 2 

Advanced Orchestration 405, 406, 407 2 2 ? 

Strings Class 455 2 

Woodwinds Class 457 2 

Brass Class 459 2 

Percussion Class Methods 429 2 

Applied Music Electives 2 2 2 

Electives 4 4 

Music Literature Electives 2 2 2 

Orch., Band, or Chorus 481A, B, or C; 482A, B, or C; 483A, B, or C. . . 

16 16 14 

MUSIC COURSES (MUS) 

101-102-103— Music Theory. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: A knowledge of music notation. 

Scales, intervals, and part-writing, using triads, the dominant seventh chord, 
non-harmonic tones and modulation. Correlated keyboard harmony and dicta- 
tion. Sight-singing in bass and treble clefs. 

131-132-133— Survey of Music Literature. Two hours each. 

A cultural course in the appreciation and understanding of music. 

165— The Enjoyment of Music. Four hours. 

Study of the basic elements of music necessary for intelligent listening 
and appreciation; survey of the history of music in its social and cultural 
context. 

This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement in the university core but 
may not be applied toward a Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education, 
or a music minor. Music minors are to take MUS 131-32-33 in lieu of this 
course. 

201-202-203— Advanced Music Theory. Four hours each. 

Prerequisites: MUS 101, 102, 103. 

Part-writing, including secondary seventh chords, borrowed chords, altered 
chords, and foreign modulation. Correlated keyboard harmony, dictation, and 
sight-singing. 



il 7 



School of Fine Arts 



231-232-233— History of Music. Two hours each. 

Prerequisites: MUS 131, 132, 133 and MUS 101, 102, 103. 

Music of primitive nations; rise and developments of liturgy; the Poly- 
phonic Age; the rise of opera and oratorio; the periods of Bach and Handel, 
Haydn, and Mozart; advent of Beethoven; American musical development. 

301-302-303 — Harmonic and Formal Analysis. Two hours. 
Prerequisites: MUS 201, 202, 203. 

Music of various periods is analyzed formally, harmonically, and contra- 
puntally. 

311-312-313— Composition. Two hours. 
Prerequisites: MUS 301, 302, 303 and MUS 321, 322, 323. 
Composition in the smaller forms. Contemporary and stylistic techniques. 
Steps in the preparation of music for publication are included. 

321-322-323— Counterpoint. Two hours each. 
Prerequisites: MUS 201, 202, 203. 

Two, three, and four-voice contrapuntal writing in the style of Palestrina 
and/or Bach. 

351-352-353— History of Church Music. Two hours. 

History of Christian Church music, with emphasis on the use of literature; 
history of organ music with emphasis on its use in the church service; and 
history of choral music with emphasis on its use in the church service. 

401-402 — Orchestration. Three hours each. 
Prerequisites: MUS 201, 202, 203. 

A study of the instruments of the band and orchestra. Scoring for instru- 
mental and vocal combinations. 

405-406-407— G405, G406, G407— Advanced Orchestration. Two hours each. 

Prerequisites: MUS 401, 402. 

411-412-413— G411, G412, G413— Advanced Composition. Two hours each. 

Prerequisites: MUS 311, 312, 313. 

Writing in larger forms for various choral and instrumental combinations. 

421-422-423— G421, G422, G423— Advanced Counterpoint. Two hours each. 
Prerequisites: MUS 321, 322, 323. 

Eighteenth century canons and fugal writing. Sixteenth century writing in 
madrigal style. 

430-G430 — Musical Acoustics. Four hours. Winter and Summer. 

An investigation of the nature and perception of musical sounds designed 
to lead to a better understanding of problems of tone production, intonation, 
and allied musical aspects. 

431 -G431— History of Opera. Four hours. 

The history of the musical theatre from Greek drama to the present. Open 
to non-music majors with consent of instructor. Offered 1968-69 and alternate 
years. 

432-G432 — American Music. Four hours. 

A study of the development of music in North America with particular 
emphasis in three areas: (1) European heritage; (2) jazz; (3) composers of the 
twentieth century whose idiom evidences strong roots in American culture. 
Open to non-music majors with consent of instructor. Offered 1968-69 and 
alternate years. 

433-G433— 20th Century Music. Four hours. 

Examination of musical trends since Debussy and Mahler. Open to non- 
music majors with consent of instructor. Offered 1968-69 and alternate years. 



iiS 



Music 



435-G435 — Baroque Music. Four hours. 

Rise of oratorio and opera; keyboard literature; development of the con- 
certo principle; instrumental ensembles; sacred and secular cantatas; perform- 
ance practice. Open to non-music majors with consent of instructor. Offered 
1967-68 and in alternate years. 

436-G436— 18th Century Music. Four hours. 

Development of the sonata-concept and its application to musical forms 
through Beethoven; performance practice. Open to non-music majors with 
consent of instructor. Offered 1967-68 and in alternate years. 

437-G437— 19th Century Music. Four hours. 

Origins of musical romanticism; expansion of the sonata-concept; sym- 
phonic poem and music drama; piano works and Lieder; nationalism. Open to 
non-music majors with consent of instructor. Offered 1967-68 and in alternate 
years. 

441A-442A-443A— G441A, G442A, G443A— Vocal Literature. Two hours 
each. 

Required of all senior voice majors. 

441B-442B-443B— G441B, G442B, G443B— Piano Literature. Two hours 
each. 

Required of all senior piano majors. 

441C-442C-443C— G441C, G442C, G443C— Organ Literature. Two hours 
each. 

Required of all senior organ majors. 

441D-442D-443D— G441D, G442D, G443D— Instrumental Literature. Two 
hours each. 

Required of all senior instrumental majors. 

441E-442E-443E— G441E, G442E, G443E— Choral Literature. Two hours 
each. 

A survey of accompanied and unaccompanied choral music from Gregorian 
chant to the present. Open to non -music majors with consent of instructor. 

441F-442F-443F— G441F, G442F, G443F— Symphonic Literature. Two hours 
each. 

The history and literature of the symphony orchestra from 1600 to the 
present. Open to non-music majors with consent of instructor. 

441H-442H-443H— G441H, G442H, G443H— Chamber Music. Two hours 
each. 

A survey of music for small instrumental ensembles. Open to non -music 
majors with consent of instructor. 

458 — Conducting from the Console. Two hours. 

A study of techniques required to conduct rehearsals and performances 
while seated at the organ console. 

459 — Church Music and Materials. Two hours. 

A concentrated course in music literature and resources for church use. 

460-G460— Liturgies. Two hours. 

Liturgy in worship; the Jewish and Roman Catholic liturgies and their 
music; liturgies of the Reformation period; music of the Lutheran, Calvinist, 
and Anglician churches; music of the non-liturgical churches. 

461-G461— Gregorian Chant. Two hours. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the history and de- 
velopment of Gregorian Chant. Practical experience in conducting Gregorian 
Chant is offered also. 

462-G462— Hymnology. Two hours. 

The history of the Christian Hymn from its roots to present-day forms. 



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463-G463 — Administration of Church Music. Two hours. 

Practical aspects of church music are presented in this course, such as: 
building a church library, organizing and directing the various choirs of the 
church, the volunteer choir system, directing from the console, etc. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC EDUCATION (MED) 

William Gower, Chairman 
Becker, Carnovale, Drake, Hong, Jerome, Lebsack, McDonald, Madsen, 

Maier, Neumann, Pound, Saetre, Smythe, Young, Zahrt 
The courses in Music Education are designed to give thorough and practical 
training in music pedagogy, as well as the preparation in practical and theoretical 
music, psychology, education, and cultural subjects necessary for a music 
specialist of broad background. The National Teacher Examination is required 
of all candidates for Music Education degrees. The following curricula are 
planned to meet the demands of modern music education. 

MUSIC EDUCATION MAJOR 

Piano or Voice Major 
General Supervisor 

(Leading to degree of Bachelor of Music Education) 

Freshman 

Music Theory 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 2 2 2 

Major Applied Music (piano or voice) 2 2 2 

Minor Applied Music (piano or voice) 1 1 1 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Physical Education 

Chorus 181C, 182C, 183C 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

18 18 18 

Sophomore 

Music Theory 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

History of Music 231, 232, 233 2 2 2 

Major Applied Music (piano or voice) 2 2 2 

Minor Applied Music (piano or voice) 1 1 1 

English Literature 201 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101 4 

Psychology 201 4 

Physical Science I, FS 104 4 

Physical Science II, FS 105, or Musical Acoustics 430* 4 

Biological Science I, FS 106 4 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Chorus 281C, 282C, 283C 

18 18 18 

Junior 

Harmonic & Formal Analysis 301, 302, 303 2 2 J 

Elementary Music Methods 311 2 

Intermediate Music Methods 312 2 

Junior High School Methods 313 2 

Major Applied Music (piano or voice) 2 2 2 

Minor Applied Music (piano or voice) 2 2 2 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 1 1 1 

Biological Science II, FS 107 4 

Sno-ni stiHi es Core Elective 4 

Health 179 4 



HO 



Music Education 



Education Psychology 319 4 

Psychology of Human Growth & Development— EPY 332 or 316 4 

Brass Methods 459 2 

Opera Workshop 343 2 

Chorus 381C, 382C, 383C 

17 17 17 

Senior 

Orchestration 401, 402 3 3 

Senior High School Music Methods 421 2 

Senior H. S. Choral Methods & Literature 422A 2 

Curriculum Problems in Music Education 423A 2 

String Methods 455 2 

Woodwinds Methods 457 2 

Opera Workshop 441 2 

Major Applied Music (piano or voice) 3 3 

Minor Applied Music (piano> or voice) 1 1 

Education Elective 2 

Public Address 101 4 

Principles of Teaching in High School— SED 313 "4 

Student Teaching— SED 481S 12 

Chorus 481C, 482C, 483C 

17 15 16 

*Musical Acoustics must be taken at the Senior level. 

MUSIC EDUCATION MAJOR 

Instrumental Supervisor 

(Leading to degree of Bachelor of Music Education) 

Freshman 

Music Theory 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Survey of Music Literature 131, 132, 133 2 2 2 

Major Instrument 1 1 1 

*Piano 101-1, 102-1, 103-1 1 1 1 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

Band or Orchestra 181B, 182B, 183B, or 181A, 182A, 183A 

17 17 17 

Sophomore 

Music Theory 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

History of Music 231, 232, 233 2 2 2 

Major Instrument 1 1 1 

*Piano 201-1, 202-1, 203-1 1 1 1 

English Literature 201 4 

Mathematics 100 or 101 4 

Psychology 201 4 

Physical Science I, FS 104 4 

Physical Science II, FS 105, or Musical Acoustics 430** 4 

Biological Science I FS 106 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

Band or Orchestra 281B, 282B, 283B, or 281A, 282A, 283A 

17 17 17 
*A pianist who elects the Instrumental Supervision curriculum must substitute six hours 
in private study of appropriate instruments. 
**Musical Acoustics must be taken at the Senior level. 



Ill 



School of Fine Arts 



Junior 

Harmonic & Formal Analysis 301, 302, 303 2 2 2 

Elementary Music Methods 311 2 

Intermediate Music Methods 312 2 

Junior High School Methods 313 2 

Woodwind Methods 327 2 

String Methods 325 2 

Advanced String Methods 425 2 

Percussion Methods 429 2 

Brass Methods 329 2 

Conducting 331, 332, 333 1 1 1 

Major Instrument 2 2 2 

***Minor Instrument 1 1 1 

Biological Science II, FS 107 4 

Social Studies Core Elective 4 

Health 179 4 

Educational Psychology 319 4 

Human Growth & Development— EPY 332 4 

Band or Orchestra 381B, 382B, 383B, or 381A, 382A, 383A 

18 18 18 
Senior 

Orchestration 401, 402 3 3 

Senior High Methods 421 2 

Senior High Instrumental Methods 422B 2 

Organization & Administration of School Orch. & Bands 423B 2 

Advanced Wind Methods 427 2 

Voice Class 301, 302 3 3 

Major Instrument 3 3 

***Minor Instrument 1 1 

Education Elective 2 

Public Address 101 4 

Principles of Teaching in High School— SED 313 4 

Student Teaching— SED 481S 12 

Band or Orchestra 481B, 482B, 483B, or 481A, 482A, 483A 

18 16 16 
***An Instrumental education major is required to study two minor instruments. One is 
to be a stringed instrument, the other a wind instrument selected from the family 
(woodwinds or brass) other than that of his major instrument. Percussion majors will 
select a stringed instrument and either a brass or woodwind. 

MUSIC EDUCATION COURSES (MED) 

301-302— Voice Class. Three hours each. 

A course designed to give a general knowledge of the principles of good 
singing. Primarily for instrumental and piano majors, but open to non-music 
majors with consent of instructor. 

311— Elementary Music Methods. Two hours. Fall. 

This course covers those areas essential to the music specialist who will 
teach in the elementary grades — including rhythmic, listening, singing, and 
instrumental activities — with emphasis on primary grades one, two, and three. 

312 — Intermediate Music Methods. Two hours. Winter. 

A continuation of MED 311, stressing intermediate grades four, five, and 
six. 

313 — Junior High School Methods. Two hours. Spring. 

Materials and methods appropriate for seventh, eighth, and ninth 
grades; continuation of part-singing; the adolescent voice; choral and instru- 
mental activities; general music classes; materials suitable for junior high 
school students. 



325— Strings Methods. Two hours. Fall. 



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Music Education 



Practical class instruction on violin, viola, violoncello, and string bass; 
correct playing position for each instrument; problems of beginning string 
students; materials for public school classes. 

327— Woodwinds Methods. Two hours. Winter. 

Practical class instruction on clarinet, flute, oboe, bassoon, and saxophone; 
basic embouchure and fingering problems; adjusting reeds; materials 
appropriate for use in public schools. 

329— Brass Methods. Two hours. Spring. 

Class instruction of a practical nature on trumpet, French horn, baritone, 
trombone, and tuba; problems of beginning brass students; examination of ma- 
terials suitable for public school use. 

331-332-333— Conducting. One hour each. 

Prerequisite: MUS 201, 202, 203. 

Techniques of choral and instrumental conducting. 

341-342-343— Opera Workshop. Two hours each. 

An introduction to opera as a performing art. Acting and interpretative 
techniques for singers; participation in musical productions. Required of all 
junior voice majors. Open to any university student by permission of instructor. 

361— Music for Elementary Teachers I. Four hours. 

A laboratory course designed to provide students with a basic knowledge 
of principles of notation, basic rhythmics, singing, reading of music, and the 
use of the autoharp and piano as accompaniment instruments. May not be 
applied toward a Bachelor of Music or a Bachelor of Music Education degree. 

362— Music for Elementary Teachers II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: MED 361. 

Application of the fundamental skills of MED 361 in the study and selec- 
tion of music materials and methods of presentation for the elementary school. 
May not be applied toward a Bachelor of Music or a Bachelor of Music Edu- 
cation degree. 

382 — Recreational Music. Four hours. Winter. 

Prerequisites: MED 361 or consent of instructor based upon a successful 
proficiency examination. 

Materials and techniques useful in developing recreational music activities 
including vocal and instrumental ensembles, rhythm bands, musical games, 
and community singing. 

390A, 391A, 392A— Piano Workshop. One and one-half hours each. 

A course designed to meet the needs of the piano teacher, including a sur- 
vey of standard materials together with a presentation of modern teaching 
methods. Each year the workshop utilizes the services of a nationally known 
guest consultant and lecturer. 

390B, 391B, 392B— Instrumental Workshop. One and one-half hours each. 

A survey and analysis of problems relating to instrumental music edu- 
cation through lecture, performance, and discussion with nationally recognized 
authorities in the field of instrumental music education. 

390C, 391C, 392C— Choral Workshop. One and one-half hours each. 

An examination, study, and analysis of choral techniques and procedures. A 
thorough study of literature in chronological order from early classics through 
modern and new publications. Organized and designed to meet the need of 
teachers now actively participating in professional work or anticipating entering 
the profession immediately. 

390E, 391E, 392E— Elementary Music Workshop. One and one-half hours 
each. 

Intensive examination of current problems, trends, and materials in the 
field of elementary music education, with outstanding guest consultants lead- 
ing the lecture, discussion, and demonstration sessions. 

401-402-403— Diction. One hour each. 

Prerequisite: Junior Voice. 



11' 



School of Fine Arts 



The correct use and pronunciation of English, French, Italian, and German 
as applied to vocal literature. 

421— Senior High Methods. Two hours. Fall. 

Prerequisites: MED 311, 312, 313. 

Organization and administration of music in the high school; visual aids, 
elective music classes, concerts and festivals, tests and measurements; develop- 
ment of public school music in the United States; current philosophies of music 
education. 

422A— Senior High Methods; Choral. Two hours. Winter. 

Prerequisite: MED 421. 

Organization and administration of choral activities, voice class, small en- 
sembles, boys glee club, girls glee club, chorus, public performances, and 
rehearsal techniques; materials for high school use. 

422B— ^Senior High Methods: Instrumental. Two hours. Winter. 

Prerequisite: MED 421. 

Preparation for dealing with problems of rehearsal, instrumental ensembles, 
program building, evaluation of materials, and public performances. 

423A-G423A — Curriculum Problems in Music Education. Two hours. 
Spring. 

Prerequisite: MED 422A. 

Intensive investigation of current values and trends in music education in 
America. 

423B-G423B — Organization & Administration of School Orchestras and 
Bands. Two hours. Spring. 

Prerequisite: MED 422B. 

Techniques of developing and maintaining successful orchestra, bands, and 
instrumental ensembles; research by students; emphasis on problems of march- 
ing bands and pageantry. 

424 — Instrument Repair. Two hours. 

A study of the techniques and materials necessary to perform minor re- 
pairs and adjustments on woodwind, brass, and stringed instruments. 

425-G425 — Advanced Strings Methods. Two hours each. 

427-G427 — Advanced Winds Methods. Two hours each. 

Prerequisites: MED 327 and 329. 

429-G429— Percussion Methods. Two hours each. 

Percussion majors may take additional work in brass, woodwinds, or strings 
in lieu of this course. 

431A-432A-433A— G431A, G432A, G433A— Advanced Choral Conducting. 
Two hours each. 

Prerequisites: MED 331, 332, 333 and two years of voice. 

Conducting and interpretation of representative works of the great choral 
schools and composers since the sixteenth century; opportunities for the for- 
mation of judgment of choral music. Church chorus and sacred music studied 
in fall quarter. 

431B-432B-433B— G431B, G432B, G433B— Advanced Instrumental Conduct- 
ing. Two hours each. 

Prerequisites: MED 331, 332, 333, and MUS 301, 302, 303. 

441-442-443 — Opera Workshop. Two hours each. 

A continuation of MED 341, 342, 343. Required of all senior voice majors. 

451A-452A-453A— Vocal Pedagogy. Two hours each. 

Comparison of pedagogical concepts; study of vocal production problems 
and anatomy of the vocal tract. 

451B-452B-453B — Piano Pedagogy. Two hours each. 

Modern methods of teaching; lectures, observation of private and class 
lessons; teaching piano to adults. 



a*4 



Music Education 



451C-452C-453C— Organ Pedagogy. Two hours each. 
Required of all senior organ majors. 

451D-452D-453D— String Pedagogy. Two hours each. 
Required of all senior string majors. 

451E, 452E, 453E— Wind Pedagogy. Two hours each. 
Required of all senior wind majors. 

455 — Strings Class. Two hours. 

Practical string class instruction on violin, viola, violoncello, and double 
bass; correct playing position for each instrument; materials for public school 
purposes. For music students not following the curriculum in Instrumental 
Supervision. 

457 — Woodwinds Class. Two hours. 

Woodwind instruction of a practical nature on clarinet, flute, oboe, bassoon, 
and saxophone; advanced techniques and materials for public school purposes. 
For music students not following the curriculum in Instrumental Supervision. 

459 — Brass Class. Two hours. 

Practical instruction on trumpet, French horn, baritone, trombone, and tuba; 
critical examination of materials appropriate for use in public schools. For 
music students not following the curriculum in Instrumental Supervision. 

463 — Principles of Music in Action. 4 hours. Winter and Summer. 

Prerequisite: MED 362. 

A further refinement in music skills designed specifically for the minor in 
Fine Arts for elementary teachers. A laboratory course in basic theory, key- 
board, conducting, rhythmics, class instruments, and creative listening. May 
not be applied toward the Bachelor of Music or the Bachelor of Music Educa- 
tion degree. 

490A, 491A, 492A— G490A, G491A, G492A— Piano Workshop. One and one- 
half hours each. 

A continuation of MED 390A, 391A, 392A. 

490B, 491B, 492B— G490B, G491B, G492B— Instrumental Workshop. One and 

one-half hours each. 

A continuation of MED 390B, 391B, 392B. 

490C, 491C, 492C— G490C, G491C, G492C— Choral Workshop. One and one- 
half hours each. 

A continuation of MED 390C, 391C, 392C. 

490E, 491E, 492E— G490E, G491E, G492E— Elementary Music Workshop. One 

and one -half hours each. 

A continuation of MED 390E, 391E, 392E. 

APPLIED MUSIC AND ORGANIZATIONS (APM) 
First Year 



101-102-103 


Piano 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


111-112-113 


Organ 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


121-122-123 


Strings 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


131-132-133 


Woodwinds 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


141-142-143 


Brass 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


151-152-153 


Percussion 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


161-162-163 


Voice 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


181A-182A-183A 


Orchestra 


No Credit 


181B-182B-183B 


Band 


No Credit 


181C-182C-183C 


Chorus 


No Credit 


185A-186A-187A 


Orchestra 


1 Hr. Each 


185B-186B-187B 


Band 


1 Hr. Each 


185C-186C-187C 


Chorus 


1 Hr. Each 



ia5 



School of Fine Arts 









Second Year 


201-202-203 




Piano 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


211-212-213 




Organ 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


221-222-223 




Strings 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


231-232-233 




Woodwinds 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


241-242-243 




Brass 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


251-252-253 




Percussion 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


261-262-263 




Voice 


1-3 Hrs. Each 


281A-282A-283A Orchestra 
Prerequisite: 181A, 182A, 183A 


No Credit 


281B-282B-283B Band 
Prerequisite: 181B, 182B, 183B 


No Credit 


281C-282C-283C Chorus 
Prerequisite: 181C, 182C, 183C 


No Credit 


285A-286A-287A Orchestra 
Prerequisite: 185A, 186A 187A 


1 Hr. Each 


285B-286B-287B Band 
Prerequisite: 185B, 186B, 187B 


1 Hr. Each 


285C-286C-287C Chorus 
Prerequisite: 185C, 186C, 187C 


1 Hr. Each 








Third Year 


301-302-303 




Piano 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


311-312-313 




Organ 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


321-322-323 




Strings 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


331-332-333 




Woodwinds 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


341-342-343 




Brass 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


351-352-353 




Percussion 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


361-362-363 




Voice 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


371-372-373 




Ensemble 


2 Hrs. Each 



Prerequisite: Junior standing in the applied music area concerned. 
Instrumental ensemble in piano, organ, strings, and winds. The study and per- 
formance of two-piano literature, and/or ensemble works for string, piano, 
organ, voice, woodwinds, and brasses. 

315— Recital. Hrs. 

381A-382A-383A Orchestra No Credit 

Prerequisite: 281C, 282C, 283C 

381B-382B-383B Band No Credit 

Prerequisite: 281B, 282B, 283B 

381C-382C-383C Chorus No Credit 

Prerequisite: 281C, 282C, 283C 

385A-386A-387A Orchestra 1 Hr. Each 

Prerequisite: 285A-286A-287A 

385B-386B-387B Band 1 Hr. Each 

Prerequisite: 285B-286B-287B 

385C-386C-387C Chorus 1 Hr. Each 

Prerequisite: 285C-286C-287C 



116 



Theatre 







Fourth Year 


401-402-403 


Piano 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


411-412-413 


Organ 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


421-422-423 


Strings 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


431-432-433 


Woodwinds 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


441-442-443 


Brass 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


451-452-453 


Percussion 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


461-462-463 


Voice 


1-4 Hrs. Each 


471-472-473 


Advanced Ens< 


smble 2 Hrs. Each 



Prerequisite: 371, 372, 373, and senior standing in the applied music area con- 
cerned. 

The study of chamber music literature, with participation in public programs 

of chamber music. 

415— Recital. (2-3) Hrs. 

481A-482A-483A Orchestra No Credit 

Prerequisite: 381A-382A-383A 

481B-482B-483B Band No Credit 

Prerequisite: 381B-382B-383B 

481C-482C-483C Chorus No Credit 

Prerequisite: 381C-382C-383C 

485A-486A-487A Orchestra 1 Hr. Each 

Prerequisite: 385A-386A-387A 

485B-486B-387B Band 1 Hr. Each 

Prerequisite: 385B-386B-387B 

485C-486C-487C Chorus 1 Hr. Each 

Prerequisite: 385C-386C-387C 

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE (THE) 

G. F. Hartwig, Chairman 

Pollock, Zillmer 

Curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Fine 
Arts are given below. 

Students who plan to teach speech on a secondary level (both theatre and 
forensics) should plan their programs through the Department of Communica- 
tion in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Students not in the field of Theatre, but interested in producing musicals 
and operas, should take Theatre 201-203. 

A minor program of 28 hours is also available in Theatre and should be 
planned with the consent of the major professor. 

All theatre majors are required to enroll for THE 300 during the last six 
quarters of their undergraduate residency. 

Theatre Program Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Science 4 4 4 

Social Science Core Elective 4 4 

Theatre 103 4 

Music 165 or Art 120 4 

Public Address 101 4 

Elective 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

17 17 17 



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School of Fine Arts 



Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 4 4 

Foreign Language 4 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Mathematics 4 

Theatre 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

17 17 17 

Junior Year 

Theatre 317, 318, 319 4 4 4 

Foreign Language 4 4 4 

Theatre 302 4 

Theatre 306 4 

Theatre 304 2 

Theatre 413, 414 4 4 

Elective 6 

Theatre 300 1 1 1 

17 17 17 

Senior Year 

Theatre 435 4 

Theatre 412 4 

Theatre 401 4 

Theatre 418, 420 4 4 

Theatre 421, 422 4 4 

Electives 8 4 8 

Theatre 300 1 1 1 

17 17 17 

Theatre Program Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102, 103 4 4 4 

Science 4 4 4 

Social Science Core Elective 4 4 

Theatre 103 4 

Music 165 4 

Public Address 101 4 

Art 120 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 101, 102, 103 (male students) 1 1 1 

17 17 17 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 4 4 

Foreign Language 4 4 4 

Political Science 101 4 

History 101, 102 4 4 

Mathematics 4 

Theatre 201, 202, 203 4 4 4 

Physical Education 

Military Science 201, 202, 203 (male students) 1 1 1 

17 17 17 



1lS 



Theatre 



Junior Year 

Theatre 317, 318, 319 4 4 4 

Theatre 302 4 

Theatre 306 4 

Theatre 304 2 

Theatre 413, 414 4 4 

Electives 4 4 10 

Theatre 300 1 1 1 

17 17 17 

Senior Year 

Theatre 435 4 

Theatre 412 4 

Theatre 401 4 

Theatre 418, 420 4 4 

Theatre 421, 422 4 4 

Electives 8 4 8 

Theatre 300 1 1 1 

17 17 17 

THEATRE COURSES (THE) 

103 — Introduction to Theatre. Four hours. 

A comprehensive study of theatre as an art form, critical methods em- 
ployed, elements of dramatic construction, forms and styles; development of 
the theatre, and major movements since 1875; contemporary American the- 
atrical practice. 

Ill — Fundamentals of Oral Interpretation. Four hours. 

Study, analysis, presentation of poetry and prose for reading aloud, with 
emphasis upon voice analysis, and critique. 

201, 202, 203— Theatre Production I, II, in. Four hours each. 

A survey of all aspects of Theatre. Practical application of one area of 
Theatre in a major university production. Recommended for high school play 
directors, and those desiring an over- all acquaintance with the various phases 
of theatrical production. 

300 — Theatre Workshop. One hour. May be repeated for a total of six hours. 

Participation in the major and graduate productions of the department. 
Required of all theatre majors during the last six quarters of their under- 
graduate residency. 

302— Stagecraft. Four hours. 

Both study and practical application of the techniques of building and 
painting stage scenery and properties. 

304 — Stage Makeup. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Techniques of using stage makeup in the various styles and designs of 
theatrical presentations. 

306 — Scene Design. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: THE 302 or consent of instructor. 

Elements of stage design. Play analysis in terms of visualization and style, 
and the mechanics of developing an effective stage setting. 

311 — Advanced Oral Interpretation. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: THE 111., 

Plays, novels, and long poems arranged for public presentation. 

317, 318, 319— History of European Theatre. Four hours each. 
Study of the development of European theatres and their literatures from 
the time of early Egypt to the present. 

401-G401 — History and Design of Costumes. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 



1X9 



School of Fine Arts 



Study of both historical and contemporary costume designs and their 
methods of construction for theatrical presentations. 

412 -G412— Stage Lighting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Theory and application of general and special lighting, color, instrumenta- 
tion, and control. 

413- G413— Acting I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: THE 201, 111, or consent of instructor. 

Fundamentals of movement, pantomime, voice, and characterization for 
the stage. 

414-G414 — Acting II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: THE 413-G413. 

Continuation of Acting I with emphasis on scene work and style: 

416-G416 — Play writing. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Study and research in the elements of play structuring culminating in an 
original one-act play . 

| 418-G418 — Directing I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: THE 413-G413. 

Principles of stage directing. 

420-G420^Directing II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: 418-G418. 

Continuation of Directing I with emphasis on scene work. 

421-G421, 422-G422— History of the American Theatre. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: THE 201 or consent of instructor. 

The development of the American theatre and its literature from colonial 
times to the present. 

425- G425— Lyric Theatre. Four hours. 

Study of musical theatres and their literatures, together with an analysis 
of the various uses of music in theatrical presentations. 

430-G430, 431 -G431— Summer Theatre I, II. Four hours each. 

Prerequisite: Consent of staff. 

An eight-week program covering all phases of theatre production in an 
operating summer stock theatre. Hours must be taken concurrently. 

435-G435 — Advanced Scene Design. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: THE 306 or consent of instructor. 

The techniques of scene design as applied to non-realistic stage settings. 

492-G492— Problems in Theatre I, II. Two hours each. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
Special research study. 



i$o 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Mary R. Harkins, Dean 
Bain, Balmat, Whisenhunt 

PURPOSE 

The purpose of the School of Nursing is to educate students to become 
professional nurse practioners. 

HISTORY 

The School of Nursing of the University of Southern Mississippi was 
authorized by Senate Bill 2280 of the State Legislature during the general 
session of 1966. Legislation was enacted in response to the need for an increase 
in the number of qualified nurse practitioners. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students who are admitted to the School of Nursing must: (1) meet the 
requirements for admission to the University; (2) complete the Basic College; 
(3) demonstrate scholastic achievement; (4) possess personal and social fitness 
for professional nursing practice. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 



First Year 



Basic College Core Curriculum 



Fall Quarter 



Hrs. Winter Quarter Hrs. Spring Quarter 



Chemistry 101 5 

Biology 101 4 

English 101 4 

Mathematics 101 4 

Phy. Ed 

17 



Fall Quarter Hrs. 

Biology 228 4 

Pol. Sci. 101 4 

Chemistry 251 4 

Sociology 103 4 

Phy. Ed 

16 



Hrs. 



Chemistry 102 5 

Biology 102 4 

English 102 4 

Fine Arts 4 

Phy. Ed 

17 

Second Year 

Winter Quarter Hrs. 

Biology 229 4 

English 201 4 

Chemistry 252 4 

History 101 4 

Phy. Ed 

16 



Chemistry 103 5 



Biology 103 

English 103 

Public Address 101 
Phy. Ed 



4 
. 4 
. 4 
. 

17 



Spring Quarter Hrs. 

Chemistry 253 4 

English 202 4 

History 102 4 

Psychology 201 4 

Phy. Ed 

16 



NURSING 

The learning experiences in the major are selected by the Nursing faculty 
and are designed to enable the student, upon graduation, to practice profes- 
sional nursing in any setting in which organized nursing is performed. A va- 
riety of community health agencies have been designated to serve as the 
laboratory for learning nursing. All of the learning experiences are guided by 
the university faculty in Nursing. 

In addition to the nursing courses, students enroll in general education 
courses. 

COST 

The general fees and expenses are the same for nursing students as they 
are for the other university students. Additional charges are made for items 
and activities peculiar to nursing, such as uniforms and transportation. 



* 3 I 



DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Paul C. Morgan, Dean 

PURPOSES 

The University of Southern Mississippi is cognizant of community and 
public needs. It accepts the challenge of assisting in these areas so far as pos- 
sible within the scope of law and policy. It makes available its staff, its lead- 
ership, its facilities, and the products of its research in stimulating educational, 
cultural, governmental, and material growth. Such services are provided 
through consultations, conferences, institutes, workshops, resident centers, 
extension classes, correspondence study, and non-credit community service 
courses. 

DEPARTMENT OF CORRESPONDENCE 

For those who are unable to attend the University, the Department of Cor- 
respondence of the Division of Continuing Education offers at a nominal fee 
a number of courses which may be taken by correspondence for university 
credit. As many as 48 quarter hours (no more than 12 in one academic area) 
of the total 192 -hour baccalaureate degree requirements may be earned in 
such correspondence courses, subject to the provisions outlined in detail in the 
special issue of the University Bulletin devoted to the Division of Continuing 
Education. The Department of Correspondence has a contract with the United 
States Armed Forces Institute of Madison, Wisconsin. Under the terms of this 
contract, the United States Government will pay the tuition charge of cor- 
respondence courses for members of the Armed Forces throughout the world. 
Additional information concerning correspondence courses for military per- 
sonnel may be obtained from the 1966-67 Bulletin of the Division of Continuing 
Education, or from the 1966 edition of the United States Armed Forces Insti- 
tute's publication entitled, "Correspondence Courses Offered by Colleges and 
Universities through the United States Armed Forces Institute." 

The Correspondence Department has been approved by the Veterans 
Administration to offer correspondence courses to veterans under the terms of 
the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966. Veterans enrolling in cor- 
respondence courses under the terms of this act will be reimbursed by the 
Veterans Administration for the total cost of the courses enrolled in, but will 
not receive subsistence. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

In 1962, the Division of Continuing Education officially added a Depart- 
ment of Adult Education to serve as an administrative unit through which the 
University could offer non-credit courses of a special interest nature to the 
general public. This department was the forerunner of the present Department 
of Community Services. 

The activities of the Department of Community Services are being gradu- 
ally expanded, and currently include courses designed to appeal to the profes- 
sional cultural, and recreational interests of the adult citizens of the univer- 
sity community. In planning non-credit courses, an attempt is made to prevent 
duplication of credit courses currently offered in the university curricula. 

DEPARTMENT OF 
CONFERENCES, INSTITUTES, AND WORKSHOPS 

Conferences, institutes, and workshops have been sponsored by the Uni- 
versity of Southern Mississippi for many years. The coordination of these 
activities is a responsibility of the Division of Continuing Education. This Di- 
vision stands ready at all times to assist educational, professional, business, and 
industrial groups in setting up conferences, institutes, or workshops either on 
or off the university campus. 



*3* 



Nursing Degree 



Credit may be awarded for conference, institute, or workshop attendance 
provided prior approval is given by the Academic Council and provided quali- 
fied instructors, consultants, and lecturers are utilized. Normally, a maximum 
of one and one- half quarter hours credit per week may be earned in such 
activities. 

Conveniently located and comfortable building facilities are available on 
the university campus as meeting places for groups of any size. Housing in 
university dormitories or the University Union Building and meals in the Uni- 
versity Commons, all at nominal rates, are also available to individuals part- 
icipating in both credit and non-credit programs. Additional conveniences 
include the location of motels, resturants, and shopping centers within walking 
distance of the campus. 

DEPARTMENT OF EXTENSION AND RESIDENT CENTERS 

The function of the Department of Extension and Resident Centers is to 
make available, as largely as possible, to every community and individual in 
the state the advantages of the general equipment, educational training, and 
specialized information represented on the campus of the University. 

Arrangements can be made to offer by extension most of the undergradu- 
ate and some of the graduate courses included in the general catalog of the 
University. In-service programs, running over a period of six to nine months, 
and short term courses, with or without credit, may also be organized through 
the Extension Department. 

The University currently operates resident centers on Keesler Air Force 
Base, in the Jefferson Davis Junior College facilities at Handsboro, in the Mu- 
nicipal Junior College facilities at Meridian, in the Belhaven College facilities 
at Jackson, and in the Natchez-Adams County High School facilities at Natchez. 
The academic programs of the Jackson, Natchez, and Keesler Air Force Base 
Centers include the first three years of college work, while the centers at Hands- 
boro and Meridian offer only the third year of work in order that there may be 
no repetition of the courses offered by the local junior college. Graduate 
courses are being offered in increasing numbers at all the resident centers. 

Permanent extension centers are in operation in the Jackson County Jun- 
ior College facilities at Gautier, the Southwest Mississippi Junior College 
facilities at Summit, and on the Mississippi Test Site at Picayune. 

Individuals interested in enrolling in classes at any of the resident or ex- 
tension centers should contact either the center director or the Dean of Con- 
tinuing Education. 

ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING PROGRAM 

The University of Southern Mississippi, through its Division of Continuing 
Education, offers at its Natchez Resident Center an Associate Degree Program 
in Nursing which prepares graduates to function with intellectual competency 
in administering direct nursing care in hospitals and similar institutions. Stu- 
dents who complete this program, based on the completion of seven quarters 
of work, are awarded an Associate of Science in Nursing Degree by the Uni- 
niversity and are eligible to write the Mississippi State Board Test Pool Exam- 
ination for licensure as registered nurses. 

The Associate Degree Nursing Program is accredited by the Board of 
Trustees of Institutions of Higher Learning of the State of Mississippi which 
is the legal accrediting agency for nursing programs in the state. Agency mem- 
bership is held in the Department of Associate Degree Nursing Programs of 
the National League for Nursing. 

The purpose of the nursing program is the preparation of competent prac- 
titioners of nursing by providing organized subject matter and learning oppor- 
tunities which will enable the student to develop: 



*33 



Division of Continuing Education 



4. 



5. 



Scientific knowledge, understanding, and clinical skills necessary to 
identify nursing problems, plan a solution, initiate appropriate action, and 
evaluate the results as she practices nursing in general duty positions. 
Knowledge and skill in human relations to assist in administering effective 
nursing care. 

The ability to think and to base action on principles rather than on tech- 
niques. 

Sociological insights and understandings of patients as individuals and as 

members of a family and a community. 

Health knowledge and skill in interpreting information for the patient and 

his family. 
6. A realization of obligations — physical, spiritual, and moral — to herself, to 

the profession, and to those she serves. 

Applicants interested in the Associate Degree Nursing Program should 
write to Miss Flora Posey, Director, Box 794, Natchez, Mississippi 39120, for 
information concerning requirements for entrance. 

The program requirements are: 

1. Successful completion of the required program in effect at the time of 
graduation. 

2. Completion of the program within three years of the enrollment date. Any 
course taken more than three years prior to graduation must be re -evalu- 
ated for possible credit. 

3. Completion of the courses in nursing in the recommended sequence. 

4. A grade of C or better in each course in nursing for progression during 
the program and for recommendation for the licensure examination. 

5. Development of qualities considered by the nursing faculty to be essential 
for the practice of nursing. A student failing to develop these qualities may 
be requested to withdraw from the nursing program. 



THE ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN NURSING CURRICULUM 

First Year 



Fall Quarter Hrs. 

Biology 228 4 

English 101 4 

Fundamentals of 

Science 104 4 

Nursing 00 

Nursing 101 6 



Winter Quarter Hrs. 

Biology 229 4 

English 102 4 

Food & Nutrition 323. 2 

Nursing 102 4 

Psychology 201 4 



Spring Quarter Hrs. 

Biology 339 4 

English 103 4 

Nursing 103 6 

Psychology 316 4 



18 



18 



18 



Fall Quarter Hrs. 

Biology 340 4 

Nursing 201 10 

Sociology 103 4 



Summer Quarter Hrs. 

Nursing 104 8 

Second Year 

Winter Quarter Hrs. 

Elective* 4 

History 101 4 

Nursing 202 10 



Spring Quarter Hrs. 

History 102 4 

Nursing 203 10 

Nursing 204 4 



18 



18 



18 



*To be chosen from the Basic College core curriculum. 

Note: The curriculum may vary according to circumstances and changes in nursing. 



^34 



DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Sarah L. Weaver, Chairman 

Brister, Chichester, Dickerson, Drain, Fritzsche, Gayle, Golden, Gunn, 

Hamman, Hesson, Lancaster, McCarthy, Owings 

PURPOSE 

The curricula and courses in the Division of Home Economics are planned 
to place major emphasis on improving family life. Students are prepared to 

assume responsibilities in areas related to the various aspects of living con- 
cerned with the environment of the individual, the family, and the com- 
munity. These areas are child development, clothing and textiles, food and 
nutrition, home economics education, housing and home management, mar- 
riage and family life. 

ORGANIZATION 

Bachelor of Science majors are offered in Child Development, Clothing 
Merchandising, Clothing and Textiles, Food and Nutrition, Institution Man- 
agement-Dietetics, Institution Management-Commercial, Home Economics 
Education-Teaching, Home Economics Education-Extension Service, Home 
Economics in Equipment, and General Home Economics. A two-year schedule 
which leads to a certificate is offered for school lunch managers. 

CURRICULUM: BASIC COLLEGE AND DIVISION CORE 

The core curriculum for the Bachelor of Science degree as outlined below 
is to be followed by the student who pursues any major in the Division of Home 
Economics. 

English 101, 102, 103, 201, and 202 or 330 or 433 20 20 

History 101, 102 8 8 

Mathematics (Home Economics majors who take Chemistry 

must take Mathematics 101) 4 4 

Science 12 or 16 

Majors in Institution Management, Clothing and Textiles, Home Economics 
Education, Food and Nutrition must take: 

Chemistry 121, 122, 123, and Biology 101 
Majors in Child Development, Clothing Merchandising, 
Equipment, and General Home Economics must take: 

Biology 101, 339x, and a four-hour course in a laboratory 

science, or Biology 101, 102, and 339x 

Social Science* 16 16 

Political Science 101 

Economics (Economics 200 required except for Clothing 

Merchandising majors, who must take Economics 251) 

Sociology 103 

Psychology 201 

Other Courses 12 12 

Health 179 

Public Address 101 

Art 111 instead of Art 120 

Home Economics** 18 or 18 

Home Economics Education 122*** 

Food and Nutrition 137 or 178 (For Institution Management- 
Commercial) 



*35 



Division of Home Economics 



Food and Nutrition 285 or 262 (For Institution Management- 
Commercial) 
Clothing and Textiles 126 

Not required for Institution Management-Commercial majors 
Child Development 139*** 

Military Science (for men) 6 6 

Physical Education — six quarters (non-credit) 



Total 96 or 100 

Note: Majors in Institution Management-Commercial will have only 90 or 94 

hours. 
♦Increased hour requirement of courses listed in the core. 
**Required by the Division. 

xTo be taken the junior year after being admitted to the Division. 

***Not required of transfer students, or students majoring in Institution Management — 
Commercial. 

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE 

Freshman Year 

Course Hours 

Home Economics Education 122 2 

Food and Nutrition 137 or 178 (Institution Management-Commercial) . . 4 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

History 101, 102 8 

Political Science 101 , 

♦Clothing and Textiles 126 

Mathematics 101 or 100 

Biology 101 

Art 111 

♦Child Development 139 

Physical Education — one course to be taken each quarter Non-Credi 



Total 50 

♦Institution Management-Commercial majors substitute a course for these. 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 or 330 or 433 8 

Sociology 103 4 

♦Economics 200 4 

Health 179 4 

Psychology 201 4 

Speech 101 4 

Food and Nutrition 285 or 262 (Institution Management-Commercial) . . 4 

Chemistry 121, 122, 123, or Biology 102 12 or 4 

Requirements for Minor (or electives) 4 or 12 

Physical Education— one course to be taken each quarter . . Non-Credit 



Total - 48 or 48 

* Clothing Merchandising majors substitute Economics 251. 

Core for Junior- Senior Level 

All students in the junior and senior years regardless of the major selected 
in the Division of Home Economics are expected to take, in addition to the 
core plan for freshman and sophomore years, a common core of courses. 

Course Hours 

♦Food and Nutrition 335 4 



X$6 



Chad Development 



Marriage and Family Living 351 4 

**Child Development 338 4 

Health 333 or HHM 334 2 

Total in Core for Junior-Senior Level 14 

*For majors in Child Development, substitute F & N 336. 

**For majors in Clothing and Textiles, Clothing Merchandising, Home Economics in 
Equipment, and Institution Management-Dietetics, Child Development 139 may be sub- 
stituted. 

CURRICULUM MAJORS 

The curriculum requirements for majors are outlined under the respective 
sub -titles below. 

OFFERINGS FOR NON-MAJORS 

Students may earn a minor in Home Economics by selecting twenty -eight 
hours of work from the following courses: Child Development 139 and 338; 
Clothing and Textiles 126,304, and 312; Food and Nutrition 137, 178, 262, 285, 323, 
335, and 336; Housing and Home Management 305 and 482; Marriage and Family 
Life 151 and 351. The same courses may be selected for electives. The only 
prerequisite to these courses for non-majors is the necessary academic standing; 
courses with junior or senior numbers may not be taken by freshmen and 
sophomores. Non-majors who wish to substitute other courses for those named 
above may do so if they have had the necessary prerequisites to the courses. 

A student may minor in any area in which he can major. The twenty-eight 
hours of courses for a minor in a specialized area such as Institution Manage- 
ment should be approved by the Chairman of The Division of Home Economics. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT (CD) 

The Child Development curriculum is designed to interest majors with 
special abilities and interests in young children. It provides opportunities to 
observe and work with nursery school children. Specialization in this area pre- 
pares a student for nursery school teaching and administration and for leader- 
ship in educational programs of children's institutions. Those who wish to 
begin study for positions in such areas as child welfare, college nursery schools, 
or private nursery schools should follow the curriculum in Child Development. 

NURSERY SCHOOL 

The University Nursery School was established in 1929 as a unit within the 
Division of Home Economics to provide a laboratory in which students might 
observe the development and relationships of a group of normal, healthy young 
children and participate in directing the various nursery school activities. The 
school accommodates children between the ages of three and five years. It 
operates on a full schedule (nine o'clock in the morning to three o'clock in the 
afternoon) five days per week, throughout the year. 

The daily program is planned to create an environment rich in possibilities 

for developing the child's mental, physical, and social self as well as attaining 
a greater degree of emotional maturity. The enrollment is made up of an equal 
number of boys and girls in the various age groups from town, faculty, and 
student families. 

The Nursery School, which was the first to be established in Mississippi, 
is located on the first floor of the Home Economics Building. It has ample space 
indoors and a large porch and fenced-in play area outdoors. In both space and 
equipment it meets high standards. The climate permits outdoor play the year 
round. Requests for registration must be filed with the Director of the Nursery 
School well in advance of the time the child is to be enrolled. Any child who 
meets the age and development requirements may qualify. 



*37 



Division of Home Economics 



INFANT DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

The Infant Development Center is the newest child development labora- 
tory. It is providing learning experiences in observation and participation with 
children less than three years of age. Students are able to see and work with 
two-year-olds in a morning play group and help care for infants who are given 
all day care. This Center increases the opportunities for home economics ma- 
jors to observe, study, and participate with children from the ages of babyhood 
through preschool years. The child development program enriches the home 
economics major by providing learning experiences that develop competencies 
in understanding infants and young children. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 
Course Hours 

Basic College Core 72 

Major and Division Requirements 64 

Freshman and Sophomore Home Economics Core 18 

Junior and Senior Home Economics Core 14 

Health 333 

Other Requirements in Home Economics 32 

Housing and Home Management 482 4 

Housing and Home Management 484 6 

Clothing and Textiles 304 4 

Child Development 420 4 

Child Development 482 4 

Child Development 484 6 

Child Development 486 4 

Other Requirements 6 

Psychology 316 4 

Housing and Home Management 334 2 

Minor Requirements 28 28 

Electives 22 22 

Total 192 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT COURSES (CD) 

139 — The Individual and the Family. Four hours. 

Three one-hour recitations and four hours of laboratory per week. 

Not required of junior transfer students. 

A functional course dealing with the student's immediate concerns regarding 
his family life. Special attention will be given to the development of the in- 
dividual in seeing himself objectively. Experiences in the Nursery School will 
contribute to a greater awareness of behavioral differences among individuals. 

90 or 390 — Preschool Teachers' Workshop I, II, III. One and one-half hours. 

For day-care operators, nursery school teachers, and educational leaders in 
preschool centers dealing with: 

a. Administration of Preschool Centers. 

Good principles of administration in group programs of young children. 

b. Curriculum Planning. 

Improving programs through better administrative procedures. Good 
group experiences for the preschool child. 

c. Personality of the Preschool Child. 

Understanding children's behavior — or guiding personality development. 

d. Creative Activities. 

Emphasis on art for young children. 

e. Literature and Language. 

Appropriate literature for the preschool child and use of bulletin 
boards, flannel graphs, puppets, and other resources. 



, 3 8 



Clothing and Textiles 



338 — Child Development. Four hours. 

Three one-hour class periods and five hours of observation and participa- 
tion in the Nursery School per week. 

Designed to create interest in preschool children and to develop an under- 
standing of the development and behavior patterns of preschool children. Prob- 
lems involved in guiding children toward happy, successful adulthood. 

420-G420 — Advanced Child Development. Four hours. 

440 — Infant Development. Four hours. 

Three one -hour class periods and five hours of laboratory for observation 
and participation in the Infant Development Center per week. 

A course for students and parents concerned with the infant. Particular 
emphasis will be placed on acquiring understanding of infant development. 
Readings, class discussions, and field trips into home and group situations will 
apply theory to practice. 

482— The Child's Play Environment. Four hours. 

Two one -hour class periods per week, plus six hours of participation in the 
Nursery School. 

A course for students interested in further study of preschool children and 
in developing teaching techniques. Sharing responsibilities in the daily activities 

of the Nursery School will be assumed. 

A study of the role of play in the development of young children with 
emphasis upon selection, care, and use of equipment. Opportunities provided 
to evaluate materials in use, to plan play activities for children, and to con- 
struct toys. 

484 — Supervised Participation. Six hours. 

Prerequisite: CD 420. Hours arranged. 

Directed participation as an assistant in the Nursery School for one quarter. 

485 — Participation Experiences in the Infant Development Center. Four 
hours. Hours arranged. 

Prerequisite: CD 420. 

Directed participation and responsibility for the guidance of the infants 
and toddlers in the Infant Development Center. Administration and parent 
education experiences arranged. Opportunity for study of community agencies 
concerned with the development and care of infants and toddlers. 

486 — Creative Materials and Activities for the Preschool Child. Four hours. 
A study of creative activities for children of the preschool years, including 

literature, art, music, nature study, etc. Practical experiences with these in the 
Nursery School. 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES (C&T) 

This area offers opportunities to the future homemaker for the selection 
and care of clothing and household fabrics for the family and basic principles 
of clothing construction. Two curricula are offered: Clothing and Textiles and 
Clothing Merchandising. 

The curriculum for the major Clothing and Textiles is appropriate for a 
person wishing to begin preparation for a position as a designer of clothing 
or textiles or as an editorial writer for women's pages of newspapers or maga- 
zines. It may serve as a basis for graduate study in clothing and textiles which 
might lead to college teaching or research. Suggested minor areas appropriate 
for this major include art, chemistry, journalism, radio and television, and 
economics. 



*39 



Division of Home Economics 



The major in Clothing Merchandising makes advancement more readily 
available to those seeking positions as buyers for apparel specialty stores or 
apparel departments in department stores. Also, it leads to the management 
of one's own small store or to the management of ladies apparel chain stores. 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

Courses Hours 

Basic College Core 76 or 76 

Major and Division Requirements 66 or 68 

Freshman and Sophomore Home Economics Core . . 18 

Junior and Senior Home Economics Core 14 

Other Requirements in Home Economics 34 or 36 

Clothing and Textiles 304 4 

Clothing and Textiles 313 or 452 4 

Clothing and Textiles 350 3 

Clothing and Textiles 360 4 

Clothing and Textiles 420 3 

Clothing and Textiles 456 or 457 or 365 2 or 4 

Housing and Home Management 305 4 

Housing and Home Management 482 4 

*Housing and Home Management 484 6 

Minor Requirements 28 or 28 

Electives 22 or 20 

Total 192 or 192 

*Young men may substitute HHM 315 for this course. 

CLOTHING MERCHANDISING 

Basic College Core 72 

Major and Division Requirements 60 

Freshman and Sophomore Home Economics Core 18 

Junior and Senior Home Economics Core 14 

Other Requirements in Home Economics 28 

Clothing and Textiles 304 4 

Housing and Home Management 482 4 

♦Housing and Home Management 484 6 

Housing and Home Management 305 4 

Clothing and Textiles 365 4 

Clothing and Textiles 350 3 

Clothing and Textiles 312 '. 3 

Other Requirements 8 

Art 107 4 

Psychology 202 4 

Minor (to be approved by adviser) 32 

Electives 20 

Total 192 

*Young men may substitute HHM 315 for this course. 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES COURSES (C&T) 
126— Fundamentals of Clothing Selection and Construction. Four hours. 
Two 1-hour periods and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Application of art principles in individual wardrobe planning and buying; 
understanding and applying the fundamental principles of garments to a spe- 
cific garment; application of construction principles to selection of ready-made 
garments. 



140 



Clothing and Textiles 



304— Art Related to the Home and Dress. Four hours. 

Three 1-hour periods and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: ART 111. 

A course designed to develop an understanding of applied principles of 
design in clothing, clothing accessories, and exterior and interior of houses. Op- 
portunity furnished for practid^i solution of personal and home design problems. 

312 — Consumer Textiles. Three hours. 

A practical consumer study of textiles; the fibers, structure, design, finish, 
and quality of fabrics for clothing and house furnishings including selection, 
use, and care. 

313 — Garment Selection and Wardrobe Planning. Four hours. 

Designed as an elective for home economics, marketing, business, education, 
and other majors. 

Prerequisite: Junior status or special permission of instructor. 

Selection of ready-to-wear garments on basis of need, appropriateness, 
aesthetic value, cost, and serviceability. 

350— Family Clothing. Three hours. 

One 1-hour period and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisites: C&T 126 and 304, or equivalent. 

Interpreting the problems of clothing the family in terms of the family life 
cycle; understanding factors affecting clothing decisions; socio-economic aspects 
of clothing and textiles as they affect the family members; constructing new 
garments for family members and utilizing old garments of good fabric through 
re-designing and renovating. 

360— Textiles. Four hours. 

Three 1-hour periods and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry and junior status. 

A study of the fundamental aspects of textiles: physical and chemical 
properties of fibers, yarn structure, weaves and fabric design, and finishes as 
they relate to consumer selection, use, care, and over-all satisfaction; markets 
and legislative consumer aids. 

365 — Clothes and Cultures. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. 

A study of the wearing apparel of selected cultures from ancient times to 
the present: structured to evolve concepts of dress as it relates to and is in- 
fluenced by the climatic, social, economic, and political forces of any group of 
people at any given time, culminated in an evaluation of how the historic past 
affects the present-day fashion world and its dynamic impact on society. 

420— Tailoring. Three hours. 

One 1-hour period and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisites: C&T 126 and 304 or equivalent. 

Principles and techniques of tailoring applied to a suit or coat; attention 
given to suitability of pattern and fabric to individual, pattern and fabric to 
each other, cost, garment fitting, creative design details, and appropriate acces- 
sories; application of learnings to selection and evaluation of ready-made 
tailored garments. 

452 or G452— Textile Testing. Four hours. 

Two 1-hour and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: C&T 312 or approval of instructor. 

Testing apparel and household textile fabrics by standard ASTM and 
AATCC methods; interpreting and evaluating test results; application of data 
to better consumer understanding and practices. 

456 or G456 — Textile Economics. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: C&T 312, or C&T 360, or equivalent. 



141 



Division of Home Economics 



A study of problems which affect the consumer in the production, distribu- 
tion, and consumption of textiles and clothing. Survey of recent developments 
in the textile and clothing field. 

457 — Fashion Fundamentals. Four hours. 

Fashion as a social force and the factors that affect and influence it. A study 
of the workings of the fashion world, including designers, leading markets, and 
fashion cycles. 

FOOD AND NUTRITION (F&N) 

This area provides courses in foods, nutrition, and institution management 
for undergraduate and graduate students in the Division of Home Economics. 
Some of the basic courses may be elected by non-majors from other schools of 
the University or by those selecting minors in Food and Nutrition or Institution 
Management. 

Students selecting Food and Nutrition as a major can prepare for positions 
in public health, extension, research, journalism, and commercial organizations. 

Institution Management majors may elect the curriculum for dietetics or 
the one designated as commercial. A two-year certificate course is available 
for school lunch managers. 

Positions as dietitians in hospitals, government services, or clinics are open 
to those who receive the B.S. degree with a major in Institution Management- 
Dietetics. This curriculum meets the academic requirements for admission to 
hospitals or administrative internships approved by the American Dietetic 
Association. 

Students majoring in Institution Management- Commercial can prepare for 
positions as food service administrators in restaurants, hotels, colleges, industry, 
business, school food service, and related fields. 

Suggested minors are: for Food and Nutrition majors, chemistry or journal- 
ism; for Institution Management-Dietetics majors, chemistry, general science, 
or health; and for Institution Management-Commercial majors, chemistry, 
marketing, accounting, biology, economics, art, or business administration. 

CHARCOAL ROOM 

The Charcoal Room is a modern academic laboratory for Institution Man- 
agement majors operated by The Division of Home Economics. The Charcoal 
Room is in the University Commons which is centrally located on the campus. 

The facility provides good food of high quality in attractive surroundings 
for congenial association of faculty members, staff, and graduate students with 
their colleagues, guests, and families. It also offers an excellent stimulating ex- 
perience and training center for Institution Management majors under the 
guidance of the Institution Management faculty. 

INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT-DIETETICS 

Chemistry, Health, or General Science: Minor 

Basic College Core 76 

Major and Division Requirements 76 

Freshman and Sophomore Home Economics Core 18 

Junior and Senior Home Economics Core 10 

Other requirements in Home Economics 48 

Food and Nutrition 394 2 

Food and Nutrition 442 4 

Food and Nutrition 444 4 

Food and Nutrition 459 4 

Food and Nutrition 476 4 

Food and Nutrition 478 4 

Food and Nutrition 483 6 



141 



Food and Nutrition 



Food and Nutrition 485 6 

Clothing and Textiles 304 4 

Housing and Home Management 482 4 

Housing and Home Management 484 6 

Other requirements to meet American Dietetic Association 

Requirements and the Minor 32 

Psychology 319 4 

Chemistry 251 4 

Chemistry 252 4 

Chemistry 253 4 

Biology 229 4 

Accounting 201 4 

Biology 339 4 

Personnel Management 364 or Psychology 449 4 

Electives and Other Requirements for Minor 8 



Total 192 

INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT-COMMERCIAL 

Accounting, Arts, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Economics, 
Marketing: Minor 

Basic College Core 76 or 82 

For Women— 76 
For Men— 82 

Major and Division Requirements 63 

Freshman and Sophomore Home Economics Core 8 

Junior and Senior Home Economics Core 14 

Other Requirements in Home Economics 41 

Food and Nutrition 263 4 

Food and Nutrition 394 2 

Food and Nutrition 442 4 

Food and Nutrition 459 4 

Food and Nutrition 461 6 

Food and Nutrition 462 6 

Food and Nutrition 483 6 

Food and Nutrition 485 6 

Clothing and Textiles 312 3 

Other Requirements 28 

Biology 339 4 

Chemistry 251, 252 8 

Accounting 201 4 

Finance 100 4 

Marketing 330 4 

Psychology 319 4 

*S"Tnmer Practicum 

Minor and Electives 25 or 19 

Total 192 

•Students must meet the requirements of one summer (a minimum of eight weeks) or 
equivalent of nractical exDeripnce. This entails full-time employment on an approved job 
preferably in the summer between the junior and senior year. This experience must be 
completed before registering in F&N 461. 

FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Chemistry or Journalism: Minor 

Basic College 76 

Major and Division Requirements 60 

Freshman and Sophomore Home Economics Core 18 

Junior and Senior Home Economics Core 14 

Other Requirements in Home Economics 28 



M3 



Division of Home Economics 



Food and Nutrition 442 4 

Food and Nutrition 476 4 

Food and Nutrition 478 4 

Food and Nutrition 394 2 

Clothing and Textiles 304 4 

Housing and Home Management 482 4 

Housing and Home Management 484 6 

Other Requirements : 12 

Chemistry 251 4 

Chemistry 252 4 

Biology 339 4 

Minor Requirements 28 

Electives 16 

Total 192 

Two-Year Certificate Course 

A two-year schedule of courses which leads to a certificate is planned for 
school lunch managers. The program includes general education courses as well 
as those designed to add to the special preparation of the individual as a 

school lunch manager. 

Curriculum 

General Education Courses Hours 

English 101, 102, 103 12 

Mathematics 100 

History (any course) 

Psychology 201 

Biology 101 

Health 179 

Art (any course) 

Health 333, 334 

Economics 200 

Clothing and Textiles 312 

Child Development and the Family 139 

English (Literature) 

Food and Nutrition 137 

Food and Nutrition 285 

Food and Nutrition 178 

Food and Nutrition 262 

Food and Nutrition 263 

Food and Nutrition 264 

Electives 



Total 96 

FOOD AND NUTRITION COURSES (F&N) 

137— Food Study. Four hours. 

Two 1-hour theory and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Study of the body's need for food. Application of principles in planning, 

preparing, and serving simple meals. 

56-156— School Lunchroom Conference: Purchasing. One and one-half 
hours. 

Thirty-six hours of class and laboratory work. 

Involves study of available stocks; receiving and storing practices; em- 
phasis on inventories, storage room, and food purchasing. 



*44 



Food and Nutrition 



57-157 — School Lunchroom Conference: Planning Better School Lunches. 

One and one-half hours. 

Thirty-six hours of class and laboratory work. 

Emphasis on planning and serving nutritious quantity meals at minimum 
cost. 

58-158 — School Lunchroom Conference: Food Cost Control. One and one- 
half hours. 

Emphasis on budget break-down, records, inventories, and real cost for 
school lunch. 

59-159 — School Lunchroom Conference: Personnel Management. One and 
one-half hours. 

Thirty-six hours of class and laboratory work. 
Emphasis on problems of personnel for school lunch. 

65-165 — School Lunchroom Conference: Quantity Food Preparation. One 

and one-half hours. 

Preparation of appetizing, nutritious, and attractive meals for the school 
child. 

66-166 — School Lunchroom Conference: School Cafeteria Equipment. One 

and one-half hours. 

A course designed to teach managers how to conserve time and energy 
through efficient arrangement, use, and care of equipment. 

67-167 — School Lunchroom Conference: New Developments in the School 
Lunch Program. One and one-half hours. 

Recent research and findings in phases related to the school cafeteria; spe- 
cial problems of the manager. 

68-168 — School Lunchroom Conference: Nutrition and the School Child. 

One and one -half hours. 

69-169 — School Lunchroom Conference: Organization and Management of 
Food Services. One and one-half hours. 

Designed to give experiences in executive leadership, planning, organizing, 
and controlling the activities of the organization. 

70-170 — School Lunchroom Conference: Food Storage. One and one-half 
hours. 

Designed to give understanding of how to prevent the loss of food. Em- 
phasis placed on proper temperature, ventilation, and systematic food storage. 

71-171 — School Lunchroom Conference: Methods and Materials in School 
Lunch. One and one-half hours. 

A professional, specialized course in techniques and methods necessary for 
training school lunch personnel and developing leadership in supervisory per- 
sonnel. 

72-172— School Lunchroom Conference: Work Simplifications. One and one- 
half hours. 

Principle of motion economy as related to use of human body in work 
places; application of work simplification procedure to school cafeteria prob- 
lems. 

178 — Food and Nutrition. Four hours. 

Two one-hour theory and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Practical knowledge of nutrition and its relation to health. Application of 
principles in food preparation. 

262 — Problems in Managing a School Cafeteria. Four hours. 
Three theory periods and one laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite: F&N 137 or 178. 



M5 



Division of Home Economics 



Course in the organizational structure of the federal school lunch program. 
Emphasis placed on food cost control records and management procedures con- 
cerned with nutritional aspects of the school lunch operation at the local level. 
Experience in organization, equipment, and operation of food for large groups. 

263 — Menu Planning, Food Preparation and Serving for the School Cafe- 
teria. Four hours. 

Two theory and two laboratory periods per week. 

Planning balanced school lunches and banquets, actual experiences in 
preparation and service for large groups, including lunch program. 

264 — Sanitation for the School Cafeteria. Four hours. 
Three theory periods and one laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisites: Health 179 and 333, and F&N 137. 
Emphasis on all phases of sanitation in school lunchrooms. 

285 — Meal Planning and Table Service. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: F&N 137. 

Two one -hour theory periods and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Continuation of F&N 137. Emphasis on more advanced meal planning, 
preparation, and service; scientific principles of cookery stressed. 

323 — Elementary Course in Nutrition. Two hours. 

Planned for non-home economics majors. Nutritional needs of body and 
proper selection of foods emphasized. 

335 — Nutrition. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: F&N 285 or 178. 

Intensive study of the body's need for foods, including the chemistry of 
digestion, care of digestive system, nutritive requirements of body during dif- 
ferent stages of life. 

336— Child Nutrition. Four hours. 

A study of nutritive requirements of young children, with laboratory ex- 
periences in the Nursery School. 

346 — Teaching Food and Nutrition in the Elementary Grades. Four hours. 

Course planned to give those preparing to teach in the elementary grades 
some understanding of materials and methods for teaching nutrition. 

394 — Food Problems. Two hours. 

A study of individual problems in food preparation. Problems developed 
by students in conference with instructor. 

442 or G442 — Experimental Foods. Four hours. 

Two 1-hour theory periods and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: F&N 285 or 178. 

Elementary research to determine factors affecting standard products. Ex- 
perimentation in preparation, ingredients, methods of cooking, temperature, 
and utensils used. 

444 or G444— The School Lumen. Four hours. 

One one-hour theory period and three 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Designed to give experience in menu planning, records, food buying, and 
preparing and serving food on quantity level. 

459 or G459— Institution Food Purchasing. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior status. 

The purchase of food for institutional use, including investigation of mar- 
keting conditions, sources, standards of quality, grades, methods of purchase, 
care and storage of different classes of food. 

461 — Field Experiences with Commercial Establishments. Six hours. 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the Chairman of the Divi- 
sion of Home Economics. 



.46 



Home Economics Education 



Experiences in the operation and management of commercial food and hotel 
service with cooperating establishments. Reports will be made to the faculty- 
adviser. 

462 — Institution Management with Commercial Establishments. Six hours. 

Course correlated with F&N 461 and taken concurrently with it. Problems 
in operation and management of commercial food and hotel service based upon 
experiences of the student and professional literature. 

476-G476— Diet in Disease. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: F&N 335. 

Study of diseases influenced by diet and dietary treatment of diseases. 

478-G478 — Advanced Nutrition. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: F&N 335. 

Study of current literature for new findings in field of nutrition. 

483 — Quantity Food Production and Service. Six hours. 

Two one-hour theory periods and three 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: F&N 285. 

Emphasis on actual food preparation and serving on quantity level. 

485 — Organization and Management. Six hours. 

Two one-hour theory periods and three two-hour laboratory periods 
weekly. 

Prerequisite: F&N 483. 

Organization, financial control, and personnel management for institution 
food departments. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION (HEE) 

The curricula in Home Economics Education are planned for those who 
wish to be teachers of home economics education in the schools or who wish to 
work in the home economics extension service. Those preparing for teaching 
should major in Home Economics Education-Teaching, and those preparing for 
extension service in Home Economics Education-Extension Service. 

Students who complete the curriculum in Home Economics Education- 
Teaching will receive the vocational license to teach home economics education 
in the secondary schools of the State of Mississippi. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION-TEACHING 

Basic College Core 76 

Major and Division Requirements 63 

Freshman and Sophomore Home Economics Core 18 

Junior and Senior Home Economics Core 14 

Other Requirements in Home Economics 31 

Clothing and Textiles 304 4 

Clothing and Textiles 312 3 

Clothing and Textiles 350 3 

Clothing and Textiles 420 3 

Housing and Home Management 305 4 

Housing and Home Management 315 4 

Housing and Home Management 482 4 

Housing and Home Management 484 6 

Other Requirements 6 

♦Housing and Home Management 334 or Health 333 2 

Biology 339 4 

Requirements in Education and Psychology 37 

Psychology 319 4 

Psychology 332 4 

Education 313 4 

Home Economics Education 380 4 

Home Economics Education 481 6 



M7 



Division of Home Economics 



Home Economics Education 482 6 

Home Economics Education 489 5 

Education 469 4 

Electives 10 

Total 192 

*One of these courses is part of the Junior-Senior Core. Both must be taken. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION -EXTENSION SERVICE 

Hours 

Basic College Core 76 

Major and Division Requirements 63 

Freshman and Sophomore Home Economics Core 18 

Junior and Senior Home Economics Core 14 

Other Requirements in Home Economics 31 

Clothing and Textiles 304 4 

Clothing and Textiles 312 3 

Clothing and Textiles 350 3 

Clothing and Textiles 420 3 

Housing and Home Management 305 4 

Housing and Home Management 315 4 

Housing and Home Management 482 4 

Housing and Home Management 484 J» 

Other Requirements 6 

Biology 339 4 

♦Housing and Home Management 334 or Health 333 2 

Requirements in Home Economics Education 33 

Psychology 319 4 

Psychology 332 4 

Education 313 4 

Education 462 2 

Home Economics Education 380 4 

Home Economics Education 485 , 5 

Home Economics Education 486 5 

^ Home Economics Education 489 5 

Electives 14 

Journalism or Radio recommended 4 

Total 192 

*One of these courses is part of the Junior-Senior Core. Both must be taken. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION COURSES (HEE) 

122 — Introduction to Home Economics. Two hours. 

A course designed to show the value of home economics in personal and 
family living, as well as in vocational pursuits. 

380 — The Teaching of Home Economics Education. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in home economics. 

A study of the place of home economics education in the total school pro- 
gram. Emphasis on organization of teaching plans and materials; opportunity 
for class and home experiences, and evaluation for the school home economics 
education program. 

481-482 — Observation and Student Teaching (Participation in Teaching 
Home Economics Education). Twelve hours. 

Prerequisite: HEE 380. 

485 — Extensions Education. Five hours. 

Opportunities provided to work with state extension specialists and with 
the district extension leader to become acquainted with special methods in 
extension work. 



14S 



Housing and Home Management 



486 — Extension Teaching and Observation. Five hours. 

Prerequisite: HEE 380. 

Educational experiences in extension service program for a six-week 
period, or the equivalent, with a home agent. Supervision of work provided 
co-operatively with the University and Agricultural Extension Service. 

489 — Teaching Home Economics to Adults. Five hours. 

Prerequisite: HEE 380. 

A study of the adult home economics program, including emphasis on gain- 
ful employment as provided through the Vocational Education Act of 1963. 
Observation of, and participation in, existing programs will be provided so as 
to help the student in the teaching of home economics to adults. 

HOUSING AND HOME MANAGEMENT (HHM) 

The increasing opportunities for home economists in business with utility 
companies and manufacturers of equipment for the home have created many 
positions for those with the necessary educational background. The major, 
Home Economics in Equipment, is designed for those preparing for such careers. 

HOME ECONOMICS IN EQUIPMENT 

Basic College Core 72 

Major and Division Requirements 75 

Freshman and Sophomore Home Economics Core 18 

Junior and Senior Home Economics Core 14 

Other Requirements in Home Economics 43 

Clothing and Textiles 304 4 

Clothing and Textiles 312 3 

Clothing and Textiles 420 3 

Home Economics Education 489 5 

Housing and Home Management 305 4 

Housing and Home Management 315 4 

Housing and Home Management 480 5 

Housing and Home Management 482 4 

Housing and Home Management 484 6 

Housing and Home Management 485 5 

Minor 28 

Electives 17 

Marketing 330 or Journalism or Radio recommended 

Total 192 

HOUSING AND HOME MANAGEMENT COURSES (HHM) 

305 — Housing and House Furnishings. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: C&T 304. 

Three one-hour periods and one 2 -hour period per week. 

A study of the economic and sociological problems in housing and house 
furnishings; house plans in relation to their influence on family life; trends in 
heating, plumbing, and lighting houses; selection and arrangement of house 
furnishings. 

315 — Household Equipment. Four hours. 

Two one-hour theory and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: F&N 285. 

A study of the selection, operation, care, repair, and arrangement of appli- 
ances in the home. 

334 — Home Nursing. Two hours. 
The care of the sick in the home. 

480 — Field Work in Equipment. Five hours. 

Educational experiences with home economists in the co-operatives, or 
with other utility companies. 



M9 



Division of Home Economics 



485 — Home Economics in Equipment. Five hours. 
Courses taken with HEE 480. 

Planned experiences with home economists in power and utility companies, 
lecturers, and field visits. Introduction to the role of the home economist in 
business. 

Field work for those planning to become home economists in equipment. 

482 — Economics of the Home. Four hours. 

Problems of homemaking relating to wise use of resources. Consumer 
problems of the homemaker. 

484 — Home Management Residence. Six hours. 

Prerequisites: F&N 335 and HHM 482. 

Application of the principles of homemaking through actual participation 

in responsibilities of home. Care of home; the planning, preparation, and serv- 
ing of meals; responsibility for baby; and social responsibilities. 

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIFE (M&FL) 

Marriage today is becoming widely recognized as the most important voca- 
tion for which young people can prepare. 

The primary objective of the marriage and family life curriculum is to 
assist college students to grow into intelligent, effective, and satisfying family 
members in their own homes. The vast majority of youth today marry and 
establish homes of their own. There is grave evidence of the need for giving 
intelligent and functional guidance to these young people in order that their 
homes can be satisfying and lasting. Although the basic emphasis of the cur- 
riculum is learning to become a good marriage partner and parent, it also 
qualifies the student for some avenues of employment for additional income 
and/or as a means of self-expression. 

• There is one major, General Home Economics, which incorporates under- 
graduate Marriage and Family Life courses in the Home Economics core. 

GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

Basic College Core 72 

Major and Division Requirements 69 

Freshman and Sophomore Home Economics Core 18 

Junior and Senior Home Economics Core 14 

Other Requirements in Home Economics 37 

Clothing and Textiles 304 4 

Clothing and Textiles 312 3 

Clothing and Textiles 350 3 

Clothing and Textiles 420 3 

Housing and Home Management 305 4 

Housing and Home Management 315 4 

Housing and Home Management 334 2 

Housing and Home Management 482 4 

Housing and Home Management 484 6 

Child Development 420 4 

Other Requirements 4 

Psychology 319 4 

Minor Requirements 28 

Electives 19 

Total 192 



150 



Marriage and Family Life 



MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIFE COURSES (M&FL) 
100 — Social Competencies. Two hours. 
Open to all students. 

A course designed to help the student develop competencies in social inter- 
action. 

151 — Personal Development, Dating, and Courtship. Four hours. 

Identifying student interests and problems arising out of college life; estab- 
lishing satisfying relationships in intellectual, social, and emotional environ- 
ment of college living; study personal social policies influencing dating and 
courtship. 

351 — Marriage and Family Living. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 

A course designed to give better understanding of the factors that contri- 
bute to success and happiness in marriage. Preparation for marriage; marriage 
adjustment; family functions and situations; factors making for successful 
family living. 



%$i 



INDEX 



Absences 5 

Academic Advisement 84 

Academic Policies 84 

Academic Probation 64 

Academic Programs 60 

Academic Regulations 62 

Accreditation . . . Inside Front Cover 

Accounting 61, 70, 147 

Administrative Officers 12 

Admission Requirements 39 

Advertising 158 

Aid, Scholarships, Loans 52 

Alumni Association 56 

Alumni News 56 

American College Test 39,41 

Anatomy and Physiology 96 

Anthropology (sse Sociology) . . 140 

Applied Music 62, 209, 225 

Application for Degree 68 

Application Procedure for 

Admission 41 

Application for Student Aid 

and Scholarships 52 

Approval of Faculty, 

Degree Requirement 69 

Archeology (see Religion) 133 

Architectural Technology ...62,70 

Art 62, 71, 202, 205 

Art Education 71, 202 

Arts and Sciences, 

(College of 60, 69, 75,86 

Assistant Professors 24 

Associate Professors 20 

Astronomy 131 

Athletics 46 

Audiology 61, 62, 69, 71, 143 

Audio- Visual Center 166 

Automobiles on Campus 44 



Bacteriology 95 

Bands 46 

Basic College 66, 74 

Biology 61, 69, 70, 87, 90 

Board of Trustees 11 

"Bootstrap" Program 40 

Botany 61, 69, 88, 94 

Business Administration, 

School of 60, 69, 76, 145 

Business Education 62, 70, 168 

Business Teacher Education ... 169 



Calendar 5 

Campus Life and Activities 42 

Campus Security Department . . 44 
Campus Map 2 



Certificate Programs 178 

Certification for 

Teachers . .70, 72, 120, 163, 164, 204 
Change of College, School, or 

Division 68 

Change of Major 68 

Change of Registration 63 

Charcoal Room 242 

Chemistry 61, 69, 70, 88, 96 

Child Development 62, 71, 237 

Choice of Catalog 65 

Church Music 62, 71, 214 

Classification of Under- 
graduates 65 

Class Rankings 65 

Clinic 43 

Clothing and Textiles ..62, 71, 239 
Clothing Merchandising . .62, 71, 240 

College Scholarship Service 52 

Commercial Art 62, 71, 203 

Committees, Faculty 13 

Commons 43 

Communication 61, 69, 99 

Community Services 232 

Computer Science and 

Statistics 105 

Conferences 232 

Continuing Education, 

Division of 232 

Continuing Education Fees 51 

Coordinator of Armed 

Forces Education 40 

Core Curriculum, General 74 

Arte and Sciences 75 

Basic College 74 

Business Administration 76 

Education and Psychology ... 76 

Fine Arts 78 

Nursing 78 

Home Economics 78 

Corrective Therapy 62, 70, 177 

Correspondence Courses ... 41, 232 

Counseling Services 42 

Course Numbering 65 

Course Sequences 65 

Courses Numbered 

300 and Above 68 

Credits Hours 65 



Dean's List 63, 64 

Degrees 69 

Degree Requirements, 

General 65 

Degree Requirements, 

Specific 69 

Degrees with Honors 69 

Director of Admissions 41 

Division of Continuing 

Education 232 



X$1 



INDEX 



Division of Home 

Economics 235 

Drawing and Painting ..62, 71, 203 

E 

Economics . .61, 70, 107, 149 

Education & Psychology, 

School of 60, 70, 76, 161 

Educational Administration 196 

Educational Foundations 172 

Educational Opportunity 

Grants 53 

Educational Psychology 192 

Elementary 

Education 62, 70, 76, 163, 173 

Employment Opportunities 55 

English & Literature . .61, 69, 70, 109 
English Proficiency 

Examination 68 

Entrance Requirements 39 

Examinations (Also see 

Calendar) 51, 63 

Executive Secretarial 

Studies 62, 70, 176 

Exemptions from Core 

Requirements 67 

Expenses 47 

Extension Centers 41, 233 

Extension Service 233 



Faculty 

Emeriti 15 

Professors 15 

Assistant Professors 24 

Associate Professors 20 

Instructors 31 

Faculty Committees 13 

Fees 47, 50 

Finance ...61, 70, 152 

Fine Arts, 

School of 60, 71, 78, 202 

Food and Nutrition 62, 71, 242 

Foreign Languages Ill 

Foreign Students 40 

Foreign Trade 61, 69, 150 

Foundation, University of 

Southern Mississippi 53 

Fraternities 46, 145 

French 61, 69, 70, 111, 112 



General Business 61, 70 

General Core 74 

General Education Program 74 

General Home Economics 62, 71 

General Marketing 158 

General Science Education . . 62, 70 
General Speech Education ..62, 105 
Geography 61, 69, 70, 114 



Geology 61, 69, 88, 114, 116 

German 61, 69, 70, 111, 112 

Grade Point Average 64 

Grading System 63 

Graduation Exercises 8, 9 

Graduation Fees 51 

Greek 113 

Guidance, Department of .176 

Gulf Coast Research 
Laboratory 90, 96 

H 

Health 179 

Health, Physical Education, 

a^d Recreation 62, 71, 176 

Health and Safety Services 43 

Historical Sketch 37 

History 61, 69, 70, 119 

Home Economics, 

Division of 60, 71, 78, 235 

Home Economics 

Education 62, 70, 71, 247 

Home Economics in 

Equipment 62, 71 

Honors, Degrees with 69 

Honors Program 87 

Honor Societies 45 

Hour Requirements 65 

Housing and Home 

Management 249 

Housing, Student 42 

Human Relations 196 

I 

Incidental Fees 47 

Industrial Arts 62, 70, 183 

Industrial Management ......61,70 

Infant Development Center 238 

Information Center 47 

Institutes 232 

Institution Management 62, 242 

Instructors 31 

Instrumental Music Education . . 62 
Italian 113 



Journalism 61, 69, 102 



Language 

Disorders 61, 62, 69, 71, 143 

Latin 113 

Latin American Institute 41, 56 

Library 55 

Library Science 62, 70, 71, 188 

Limitation of Correspondence 

Courses 66 

Living Accommodations 42 

Load of Work 63 

Loans & Scholarships 52 



*53 



INDEX 



M 

Major 69 

Management 155 

Map of Campus 2 

Marine Biology 93, 96 

Marketing 61, 70, 157 

Marriage and Family 

Life 250 

Mathematics 61, 69, 70, 122 

Medical Examination 41 

Medical Technology 61, 69 

Membership ...Inside Front Cover 

Memorandum of Credits 65 

Microbiology 61, 69 

Military Credit 39 

Military Personnel 40, 232 

Military Science 39, 67, 85, 125 

Minor 71 

Music 71, 209, 217 

Music Education 62, 71, 220 

Music Fees 50 

Music History and 

Literature 62, 71, 215 

N 
National Teachers 
Examination .59, 163, 199, 202, 220 

Non-Resident Students 48 

Nursery School 237 

Nursing, Associate Degree 233 

Nursing, School of ..60, 71, 78, 231 

O 

Oceanography 89 

Office Management 62, 70, 169 

Office of Research and 

Projects 38 

Organ 62, 210 

Organization Chart 59 

Organization for Instruction . . 60 
Organizations, Campus .... 45, 145 
Orientation 42 



Parents' Confidential 

Statement 52 

Payment of Fees 48 

Penalties for Late Registration . . 62 

Personnel Management 61, 70 

Philosophy 61, 69, 133 

Physical Education 67, 85, 180 

Physics and 

Astronomy 61, 69, 70, 88, 128 

Physiology 96 

Piano 62, 71, 210 

Pine Haven Apartments 43 

Placement Bureau 57 

Political Science 61, 69, 70, 131 

Pre-Professional Curricula 79 

Hour and Quality Point 66, 79 

Requirements 79 



Medical Technology 80 

Pre-Dental 79 

Pre-Engineering 83 

Pre-Law 82 

Pre-Medical 79 

Pre-Optometry 81 

Pre-Pharmacy 81 

Secretarial Training 84 

Presidents, Former 38 

President's List 63, 64 

Probation, Academic 64 

Professors 15 

Provisional Admission 39 

Psychological and Special 

Education Clinic 167 

Psychology 62, 70, 191 

Public Address 61, 69, 100 

Publications 44 

Public Relations Minor 100 

Purposes of the University 38 

Q 

Quality Point Requirements . . 66, 68 

Quarter System 62 

Quarter Hours 62 

R 

Radio-Television 61, 69, 103 

Reading Center 167 

Real Estate and Insurance 61, 70 

Recreation 62, 70, 177, 182 

Regulations, General Academic . 62 

Refund Policy 49 

Registration 62, 63 

Religion and Philosophy .61, 69, 133 

Religious Life 44 

Religious Organizations 45 

Remedial Services 167 

Research 38 

Residence Hour Requirement . . 66 

Resident Centers 41, 233 

Retail Management 159 

Room and Board 43, 48 

Room Reservations 42 

ROTC 125 

ROTC Flight Training 127 

ROTC Scholarship Program 128 

Russian 113 



Sales Management 158 

Sam Woods Collection 55 

Schedule Changes 85 

Scheduling 85 

Scholarship Standards 64 

Scholarships and Loans 52, 53 

School Administration 196 

Science Education 136, 196 

Second Baccalaureate Degree ... 69 
Secondary 
Education ..62, 70, 74, 96, 164, 199 



*54 



INDEX 



Secretarial Training 84 

Security Department 44 

Societies, Honor 45 

Sociology 61, 69, 70, 139 

Sororities 46 

Southern News and Views 56 

Southern Players 45 

Southern Quarterly 37 

Southerner 44, 50 

Spanish 61, 69, 70, 111, 113 

Special Areas 71 

Special Education 62, 71, 193 

Special Fees 50 

Special Students 41 

Special School Services 166 

Speech, General 70 

Speech and Hearing Center . 142, 168 
Speech and Hearing 

Sciences 61, 69, 141 

Speech Education 62, 105 

Speech Pathology .61, 62, 69, 71, 143 

Staff Members 35 

Statistics 61, 69, 105 

String Instruments 62, 71, 212 

Student Activities 44 

Student Aid and Scholarships . . 52 

Student Counseling 42 

Student Government 44 

Student Printz 44 

Student Publications 44 

Student Teaching 165 

Student Teaching Seminar 165 



T 

Table of Contents 3 

Tables of Expenses 50 

Teacher-Education Programs . . . 162 

Textbooks 47 

Theater 62, 71, 227 

Theory-Composition 62, 71, 216 

Therapy 62, 70, 177, 183 

Three Dimensional 

Design 62, 71, 204 

Transcript of Credit 41 

Transfer from Basic College 

to Upper-Level 67 

Transfer Students 39 

Trustees, Board of 11 

U 

University Clinic 43 

University Commons 43 

University Union 43, 47 

University Activity Council 47 

V 

Veterans 47 

Veterans Administration 47 

Voice 61, 71, 213 

W 

Wind Instruments 62, 71, 210 

Work Scholarships 52 

Workshops 232 

Work -Study Program 53 

X-Y-Z 

Zoology .. . . .61, 69, 91 



*55 



I